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Microsoft .NET - Architecting Applications for the Enterprise (Developer Reference) Paperback – October 25, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0735626096 ISBN-10: 073562609X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Developer Reference
  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press; 1 edition (October 25, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 073562609X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735626096
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #510,346 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dino Esposito is a well-known ASP.NET and AJAX expert. He speaks at industry events, including DevConnections and Microsoft TechEd, contributes to MSDN Magazine and other publications, and has written several popular Microsoft Press books, including Microsoft ASP.NET and AJAX: Architecting Web Applications.


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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This book is required reading and highly recommended.
Garren
This book concentrates on how to communicate with the development team through solid design and well known patterns and principles.
T. Anderson
After reading this book I feel it is all coming into place.
Me

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book seemed really promising from the title and mainly its author (Dino Esposito), who is one of the best .NET writers out there. It took me a while to buy it though, because for weeks I tried in vain to find its table of contents, to know exactly what I was buying. Having failed at finding one, I decided to just take a chance and buy it anyway, and I don't regret, it is a good book.

I would say the target audience is intermediate to senior developers who are getting into software architecture, or architects who work on a database-centric way and want to get an update to the current buzzwords, such as domain model pattern, repositories, services, AOP, POCO, OR/M, DDD etc. This book does not try to be a definitive source on any of those topics, but more like an introduction and a reference; the authors make a good job at pointing for resources for those who want to get more dense information.

Books like Martin Fowler's "Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture", the GoF classic Design Patterns book and Eric Evan's "Domain-Driven Design" are mentioned dozens of times, so people who have already read those books may not have lots of new stuff to see here, unless they are looking for a lighter reference or want to see how some of those ideas can be applied on .NET.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By T. Anderson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 4, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book does a great job of putting architecture into a view that .NET developers and architects can relate to.

The book covers design principles and patterns, and then relates them to each layer of a traditional layered system. It includes business, services, data access, and presentation layers. The authors include several different patterns for each layer and discuss the pros and cons of each.

The book focuses on the technical aspects of .NET architecture. It does not cover the soft skills need to be an architect, or cover the customer facing skills need to communicate with the business stakeholders. You won't find much on process either, just an overview. These missing topics have not taken away from the book, they have made it a stronger book. There are plenty of resources on how to execute the soft skills and architecture process. This book concentrates on how to communicate with the development team through solid design and well known patterns and principles.

This is a must read for all architects, no matter what your skill set is.

A .NET developer looking to move into architecture should make this book their first stop on a long journey. This will definitely get you off to a very strong start.

This book will not leave my side... until the 2nd edition...
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By James Ashley on January 1, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is a misconception that architecture is a fully understood field. Like the rest of us in the relatively young discipline of software development, architects are making their way along with rules of thumb, buzzwords and trends, too, and doing their best to tie them all together.

Microsoft has always been a bit lacking when it comes to providing guidance for developing complex software. The alt.net crowd promised to fill in this lacuna, and even promoted itself in terms of filling in the blanks that Microsoft leaves in its technology offerings. However the results have been, I think, that the contemporary architect simply has more pieces to try to put together, and even more things to try to figure out.

Dino Esposito, in "Architecting Applications for the Enterprise", tries to make sense of this technical jigsaw puzzle by building on top of the core architectural concepts of layering and decoupling applications. He then takes these principles forward by seeing how the newest technologies and techniques -- WPF, WCF, Windsor, NHibernate, Entity Framework, MVP, MVC, etc. -- can fit together to form a mature enterprise application.

In many ways he cuts through much of the hype and provides insights into why you might want to use these technologies. He is comprehensive in treating each of the various Microsoft and non-Microsoft tools soberly, explaining the pros and cons of each.

Best of all, he tries to consolidate in his appendix all of his insights into a core set of architectural principles, one of which he reiterates throughout the book: the job of the architect is to reduce complexity, not increase it. It sounds simple, but many architects tend to forget this.

Mr.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S. Thompson on April 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is divided into two halves - Principles and System Design. The first half of this book is like a computer science course in system analysis and design. In my opinion fairly boring really, unless you are completely new to the subject. It does create a context for the rest of the book and though and even though it was a bit of a chore, I did find some interesting tidbits of information in part 1. The second half of the book moves from the theory of architecting software into the implementation with comprehensive coverage of all the different logical tiers of a system - presentation, service, business and data. It also discusses the different architectures that can be applied depending on the technologies used (forms, web, ria ect). This is where this book really shines. For me the further I got into the book the more I liked it. The writing style is conversational which make this book an easy read, although occasionally the author loses the plot a little, taking half a page to cover a point that could be covered succinctly in one line or two line.

By the end of this book I kind of liked it, although having said that it doesn't really offer anything new that hasn't been covered in other books, apart from the fact that the focus is on .Net technologies. For me I don't think this book offers too much to experienced developers, especially those with a lot of experience using .Net. Also for general software architectural principals there are better books around. Being fairly new to the .Net framework I brought this book primarily for an overview of .Net technologies that could be used in architecting applications and the best practices in applying them. In that sense this book is pretty good.

So if you're new to architecting software, or want an overview of .
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