Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Integration Services and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $64.99
  • Save: $16.42 (25%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Some visible wear, and minimal interior marks. Fast shipping from Amazon, and unbeatable customer service. Amazon Prime customers get free 2-day shipping. Millions of satisfied customers!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Integration Services Paperback – July 31, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0672327810 ISBN-10: 0672327813 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $48.57
23 New from $1.99 36 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $9.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$48.57
$1.99 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Integration Services + Professional SQL Server 2005 Integration Services
Price for both: $83.65

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 888 pages
  • Publisher: Sams Publishing; 1 edition (July 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0672327813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0672327810
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 6.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,680,077 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kirk Haselden is the Group Program Manager for the Microsoft Master Data Management product forthcoming in the next wave of Office SharePoint Services and owns the long term strategy, vision, planning and development of that product. Kirk has been with Microsoft for 12 years in various groups including Hardware, eHome, Connected Home, SQL Server and Office Business Platform. He was the development manager for Integration Services and the primary designer for the runtime and many of the tasks. Prior to Microsoft, Kirk worked for several small startup companies building educational, dental and online software. Kirk has a BA in Accounting and Information Systems from the University of Utah. He has written a number of articles for SQL Server Magazine, speaks regularly at industry events, writes profusely on his personal and MSDN blog, and holds 35 patents or patents pending. Kirk is married and the father of five wonderful children. He enjoys family time, photography, snow skiing, wake boarding, racquetball, motorcycle riding, hiking, breathing, drinking, and eating. He’s always wearing hideous Hawaiian shirts, shorts, and sandals, except in the winter, when he also wears socks. He once lived in Wichita, Kansas and thinks it’s funny when people talk about themselves in third person.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Foreword

Foreword

Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 and SQL Server 2000 both contained a component called Data Transformation Services (DTS). DTS was an ETL tool. If you don't already know that ETL means Extract, Transform and Load, this might not be the book for you. But if you do care about ETL, have challenging ETL problems, and have SQL Server 2005, this most likely is the book for you! This book is about SQL Server 2005 Integration Services, the successor to DTS.

It took a unique team to build SQL Server 2005 Integration Services. If I had told you in 2000 when we started the Integration Services project that we would assemble a team of almost 30 people at Microsoft who were utterly passionate about ETL, you would have been skeptical. Through the leadership of Kamal Hathi, Donald Farmer, Eduardo Alvarez-Godinez, and your author Kirk Haselden, we did just that.

When we began planning "Yukon" (which became SQL Server 2005), we knew that our customers were facing ever larger and more challenging ETL problems. Years ago, data warehousing and business intelligence were "local" problems; or perhaps better said as "solutions to local problems."—the sales warehouse sourced answers to questions in the sales department, and marketing had its own warehouse. True performance management, the evolution of business intelligence, however, requires a complete company view. Customers want to load far more data than in the past, and they want to do so far more frequently.

We knew it was time to reinvent our ETL tool. We wanted to increase performance by at least an order of magnitude. We wanted to incorporate best-of-class ease of use, unparalleled programmability, and a very high level of out-of-the-box functionality. We truly sought to reinvent our ETL offering. Thinking about who in our industry really knew how to push a lot of processing against a lot of data, I sought out programmers and architects from the compiler team. We were lucky to find Mike Blaszczak, who had made key contributions to MFC, and who is one of the best programmers in the world. Mike in turn knew Kirk, and brought him into the team early on. In just a few years, Kirk became the Development Manager for Integration Services, and with his team, brought it to market.

This makes Kirk an ever-so appropriate guide for you in your exploration and use of Integration Services. He of course has a deep understanding of SSIS at every level—we expect that from a Development Manager. Beyond that, he has a love for users and customers that translates into a clear writing style and an enjoyable read. In each chapter, Kirk motivates you, teaches you, and delivers insight only a "Dev Manager" would possess. Pay attention to the notes in various chapters: This is where you get to see into the mind of the developer. Also, pay attention to the quotes that open each chapter—I can verify many of these, I was there to hear them, and they are often entertaining.

One of the ways in which SSIS improves on DTS is in manageability. The "configuration" is a new concept in SSIS. Configurations allow ETL developers to put some of the metadata of their package on the outside of the package, so that administrators can tweak them at deployment time. Chapter 14, "Configuring and Deploying Solutions," covers this in detail. Chapter 23, "Data Flow Task Internals and Tuning," covers optimization and tuning. SSIS can handle enterprise ETL needs, and this chapter gives you the insight and details you need to run your SSIS packages at their fullest performance.

Another area of difference between DTS and SSIS is extensibility. Chapter 24, "Building Custom Tasks," covers the development of custom tasks. Chapter 25, "Building Custom Data Flow Components," covers the development of custom components. The companion website at http://www.samspublishing.com includes all of the source code that Kirk develops in these chapters. I'm personally looking forward to using his source component to pull EXIF information out of JPEG files: Kirk is an avid photographer and has used real-world examples throughout the book.

It's been a privilege to work with Kirk for several years. I hope to work with him for years to come. He worked hard on this book because he loves SSIS and its customers. I hope you enjoy his work and profit from this book.

Bill Baker
May 2006, Redmond, WA


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.


More About the Author

I'm currently an Architect in Office in the Business Applications group working on an unannounced project.
I've been working at Microsoft in various capacities for over 10 years and enjoy building teams and developing new products. Every project I've ever worked on has been a technical version 1.0 release.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Loftus on April 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I spent several days trying to get the very first exercise to work, but failed. (Screen prints in the book are different than the printed instructions.) I then downloaded the examples from Sam's Publishing only to find that some of the coding is different than what the book shows. But the examples do work properly and are very helpful. I have to say that the book does seem to cover lots of material in detail and I am reading it cover-to-cover. There are lots of tid-bits which will save a lot of hair-pulling.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Steven Rosen on September 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
Having used DTS for many years, the transition to serious use of SSIS has

proven to be quite "challenging"...yea, that's the word. In fact, SSIS,

is a quantum leap in complexity and mindset above using DTS. It has

been many quirks, subtleties and rituals required to use it effectively.

While not 100% mature, it is very sophisticated and a powerful tool

for ETL tasks.

This book has proven to be very detailed for my needs and covers

almost all aspects of SSIS in extensive detail. It adequately explans all tasks

and how to use most every aspect and feature in creating and deploying SSIS solutions. It also

gives solid insight on best practices and guidelines on how specific

features are intended to work and not work.

The only way to really get going with SSIS is to have a comprehensive

reference so that you can understand using the tool to the greatest

degree possible. Highly recommended, very readable and useful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. Sacchetti on October 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
If you are looking for an Step-by-Step type book (which apparently quite a few reviewers are) this is not it. What it does is provide you with a very detailed understanding of SSIS. That said, I still was able to go from never using SSIS to having a fairly good working knowledge using nothing but this book in about a week and a half, so I'm not exactly sure what the issue others had is. If you're willing to learn the concepts and apply them on your own, I think you'll find this to be an invaluable resource. A year and a half later I still use it to look something or other up about once a week and it never disappoints.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Anhnhat Tran on August 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
I am a developer and it is the first time I learn about this topic. I would like to jump in and start coding right away. Most of the time, the author explains the topic by using screenshots without working samples. This book may be used as a reference book if you already has experiences with Integration Services. It is definitely not a tutorial book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. Davis on September 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
Being an old DTS saw I was pretty thrown by the division of labor between Control Flow and Data Flow. I mean I understood it conceptually but didn't "get it" practically during design time - and to be honest I was a bit intimidated by all the new features too. This book was just what I needed to get comfortable with SSIS. It walked me through the features at the right level of detail and will be a key resource for me going forward.

Note that there are a couple of 'publisher errors' in the book such as missing Appendicies but the quality of information is still great.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michelle Poolet on November 5, 2009
Format: Paperback
I have experience building simple DTS packages in SQL Server 2000, so when 2005/2008 hit the market, I was really confused. I'm not a VB programmer; I vastly prefer the Management Studio/Query Analyzer interface over other GUIs in the SQL Server environment, and where the heck did my Import/Export Wizard go? Thank you, Kirk, for explaining that first! I would advise reading Chapter 2, Setting up Integration Services.
I finally had to bite the bullet and get with the program; for me Books Online was hopeless, 'way too fragmented, if I could even find the topic that I was looking for. I disagree with a previous reviewer, this is not just a reference book, this is reference + tutorial. If you need to build an FTP task, for instance, pop over to page 151 and start following the directions. As Kirk works through the description of how to set it up, he explains why he's doing what he's doing. I'm finding this book to be one of the most valuable in my SQL 2005 collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bulldog on January 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
I'm new to SSIS. I cannot put this book down! The flow is great (probably because it is written by a single author). Chapter 4 Quickstart was a fantastic way of learning the basics of SSIS very quickly. I only started reading it this week and I'm already half way through it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Cho on October 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
I bought this book in late 2006 as migrating from DTS to SSIS. It was the best rated SSIS book back in late 2006, guess those reviewers had different expectations from mine. Although this book gave me overview of each feature of SSIS, it did not help me much for doing actual projects past year. I learned more about specifics of using SSIS from internet (googling about functions or properties) than this book.

I totally agree with some reviewers saying that this is a paper version of BOL. If you are looking for some simple overview of SSIS, this may be the one for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search