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It's the Middle Class, Stupid!
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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on July 11, 2012
Carvell and Greenberg to a good job of covering the continuing destruction of the middle class in America, and they make a strong argument that this should be the key focus of the Obama campaign in 2012.

The book includes lots of facts that demonstrate the plight of the majority of working Americans. Incomes have stagnated even though people are working harder (and longer hours), and fewer and fewer average people have health care through their employer. For example, in 1980, 2/3 of high school graduates had a job that included health care; today the figure is only 25%. Income inequality is out of control; the top 1% now owns more that the entire bottom 90% of the population.

The authors believe that while the elite (including Democrats) shy away from "class warfare" most average people understand that the rich started the war long ago, and that it is time to engage the battle. Therefore, they suggest that Obama should embrace this issue and make it central to the campaign.

One disturbing thing is that Carvell and Greenberg seem to be looking for a near landslide Democratic victory, something that would "repudiate the Tea Party" and somehow cause Republicans to be more reasonable in the future. Based on current polling and Republican behavior, I don't see much chance of this...so it's very difficult to be optimistic about the kind of change the authors are hoping for.

Nonetheless, the issues they raise are critical for America, not just for this election but over the next few decades. Technology and globalization continue to advance, and it's a good bet that as a result the problems will get worse and worse. Going forward, robots, artificial intelligence and offshoring are going to make it easier and easier for CEOs and bankers to profit while average workers continue to lose out, and it's hard to see what will turn things around.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on July 11, 2012
I've read and reviewed a lot of political books over the past 3 months, but "It's the Middle Class, Stupid!" is by far the most unashamedly political one of all. The set-up is that Carville & Greenberg are working through arguments and pitches that will appeal to voters to reverse the 2010 trends and get the Democrats back in control of the House, Senate, the presidency, and eventually even the Supreme Court. They make this whole scenario very personal--starting by telling their respective life stories and why they are both the bluest-of-true-blue Democrats.

The book then goes back and forth between them, almost like they're having a conversation and taking advantage of Carville's well-known say-what-you-think style and Greenberg's analytical way of looking at the political landscape. It's pretty compelling. One could envision this conversation happening over a period of months or even in a single particularly insightful day. It's so partisan that Democrats will love it, while Republicans might actually read it--just to see what the other side is thinking. What works about this is that Carville keeps responding emotionally -- watch out Paul Ryan! -- but Greenberg keeps reining him back in ... like "no, that's what politicians might think but the voters are ahead of us and they're smarter than you think." I read a review of another book where the reviewer wondered how two authors collaborated on a book. Kudos here to Carville in his role as bad cop and to Greenberg as good cop (or actually in his case good cop-ywriter).

The result is that over the first half of the book ... with plenty of actual quotes from focus group participants from the middle and working classes, from different races, with and without college degrees (mostly without) ... they work through a number of approaches that will give the Democrats a winning message in 2012. If you saw any episodes of "The Pitch" on AMC this season, it's like that. It takes a lot of experimenting with different messages, with different focus groups, with different Democratic decision makers to finally get to the point that they think they've got the winning tagline. You guessed it ... It's the Middle Class, Stupid!

Through the rest of the book they then explore why all campaign messaging, ads, policy proposals, speeches, debate positions, etc. have to be about how the middle class can be rebuilt because that's the only way we can turn things around. Continuing in their back-and-forth conversation, Carville & Greenberg discuss the impacts of this strategy on everything: getting the money out of politics, health care, Social Security, Medicare, everything. They make the comment that books like this are typically big on identifying problems but small on solutions. That's not the case here.

What's interesting in all this is their read on how the Republicans have ended up in this position -- one that seems so opposite to what the polls say (Congress isn't representing the people, the wealthy should be taxed, etc.) Why don't they relent when it appears to more and more people that the wealthy have gotten most of the advantages because the system seems rigged? In "It's Even Worse Than It Looks" Mann & Ornstein claim that for 40 years the Republicans have had a minority mindset and they always try to blame the Democrats when things go wrong. Carville & Greenberg have a different thesis: Since Reagan in 1981, the Republicans have aligned themselves with the wealthy and powerful. With the exception of the Clinton administrations, they have stuck with their ideology that if the rich do better, everyone else does too. This is a 30-year brand that has almost killed the middle class.

This feels like a behind-the-scenes book, from which you can already start to see their message taking hold in the campaign. Obama has started to talk more about the importance of the middle class and less about how Bush and the Republicans are to blame for where we are now. As they point out, blaming the Republicans will make the election close and maybe win it for Obama. But making this about the middle class is the only way that the past 30 years of a downward slide for many of the 75% of our citizens who are in or aspire to be in the middle class can be turned around to make this feel like America again.

7/11/2012 - Wanted to add a reference since posting this review yesterday. "It's the Middle Class, Stupid" lines up very well with E.J. Dionne's book "Our Divided Political Heart." Dionne describes how over our history America has gone through a cycle of individualism where powerful interests moved out in front to establish businesses with few regulations ... only to be followed by reform movements (think 1890-1910 or 1933-1945) that caught up with regulations, benefits and new policies that spread the wealth and benefits to communities which had become oppressed. He hopes in his book that America will repeat that cycle to protect the people who have not enjoyed the benefits that today's powerful interests have claimed for themselves. Dionne leaves it at that point with no set political or campaign strategy to implement such a vision -- something that Carville & Greenberg have offered here. You may want to consider reading "Our Divided Political Heart" after reading this book.
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76 of 96 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2012
I'm generally a Republican voter, but I've always thought well of James Carville. His heart is clearly in the right place. He wants an America where education and job opportunities are abundant such that everyone can advance to the limit of their ability as he did --- starting out as a poor kid in Louisiana and then achieving success commensurate with talent and ability. He's ferociously partisan, but in a good humored and good natured way. He's married to Republican strategist Mary Matalin, so he hears plenty of Republican input and is a popular guest on Conservative shows. He's thus the kind of political strategist who should be taken seriously by both parties.

I don't know anything about Carville's coauthor Stan Greenberg other than to say that he expresses his own ideas, which are pretty much in synch with Carville's, with clarity. Their conversational give-and-take succeeds in getting their points across in an interesting way.

The first third of this book, like so many others of its genre, is a spot-on description of the anxieties of the middle class:

=======
The middle class is struggling today because of declining wages, reduced benefits, and crushing costs for the essentials of life. It is the three decades of income squeeze that now drives middle-class identity. They are being screwed because the country's losing ground, not because they think some other group is screwing them-- unless it's the 1 percent. But we'll get to that.
========

Carville and Greenberg nail that down point by point: Employment security is a thing of the past. People have become insecure in retirement because defined-benefit pensions are largely extinct. Young people, after racking up mountains of college debt, find employment scarce and low paying. Many other recent authors have said these things, but Carville and Greenberg communicate them from the soul: much of the Middle Class is hanging on by its fingernails, fearful that they and their children might never again see real prosperity. Carville also points out that the Great Recession was the coup-de-grace of an economic illness that had been debilitating the Middle Class for many years prior:

===========
When the financial crisis struck in 2008, it had the effect of hitting somebody suffering from pneumonia with a pickup truck.
===========

Having described the debilitation of the middle class so eloquently, Carville and Greenberg then get down to the business of how to restore its fortunes. Like most mainstream Democrats, their ideas boil down to stimulating the economy by spending more public money on infrastructure and education.

==========
Third, let's talk about the word "spending." When we hear that word, we see images of bridges and roads, high-speed rail, a smart grid of green energy, eager pupils in new school buildings and a teacher still teaching there. We see fast and universal broadband reaching into rural areas, a woman gaining access to new health benefits or a senior not having to pay more for health care bills. It is exhilarating just thinking about it, and we wonder why these voters don't have the same epiphany. Their minds must be polluted by Fox News and manipulative politicians.
===========

Voters see this not as an "epiphany" but a pipe-dream. Environmental red-tape, mainly created by Democrat constituencies, has consistently blocked new infrastructure. New highways to relieve traffic congestion at Interstate chokepoints like Atlanta have been blocked in court for more than forty years. High speed rail doesn't fare much better. At current rates of environmental approval, funding, and construction it would take 500 years to build a high-speed rail link from New York to L.A. and the cost per passenger ticket to fund the project would be $25,000 a seat. Carville talks about "building airports" but we have 3,000 counties in the USA, and is there any one of them that doesn't already have an airport? Likewise, it's hard to believe that spending public money to run "broadband" into the 3% of the people who live in rural areas is going to provide any substantive economic benefit. As to Green Energy, it may already be past its peak as governments around the world have begun to stop subsidizing it with public money.

I think Democrats keep harping back to "infrastructure" because they remember that spending public money to build roads, dams, bridges, airports, and rural electrification and rural schoolhouses were key parts of FDR's New Deal public works. That made sense in 1933 when we were short of all those things, but today is not 1933. We aren't going to build a new Interstate highway system and a new Hoover Dam when we already have them, even if the environmentalists allowed for it. Moreover, modern infrastructure projects don't soak up massive amounts of unemployed labor like they did 80 years ago. In 1933 a road construction crew was 5,000 laborers spreading gravel with shovels. Today it's 50 laborers and a bulldozer.

These projects also don't put back to work the millions of accountants, computer programmers, and industrial engineers who are unemployed because their jobs were outsourced to China. Likewise, building a bullet train isn't going to do anything to help the unemployed who can't afford to buy the ticket to ride it. Most voters don't favor these budget-busting programs because they perceive them to be boondoggles that won't help THEIR unemployment situation, not because "their minds must be polluted by Fox News and manipulative politicians." These voters may sense that Democrats have their minds focused on the programs they implemented during the last Great Depression 80 years ago, and not on what we need to do to pull out of the current one.

Carville and Greenberg also make the usual Democrat spin that vastly increasing spending on education will prove to be an economic panacea. They wrap this idea in political propaganda by alleging that the Republicans are intentionally dumbing-down the public by waging an "attack on education." This is just plain silly for all kinds of reasons, not least because education spending has soared exponentially for decades in both Republican and Democratic administrations. There have been some cutbacks recently, but only because of the crippling loss of tax revenues that have afflicted states and cities during these recessionary times.

Carville and Greenberg acknowledge that the public isn't buying their nostrums. They explain the 2010 shellacking thusly:

==========
Democrats got a lot wrong. First, voters were frustrated by the lack of progress on unemployment and the seeming ineffectiveness of the president's policies....But what really angered them was the perplexing and sustained lack of focus on economic issues as people themselves struggled to survive the "Great Recession." While voters were looking for FDR-like passion for moving the economy forward, the Democrats and the president focused on it only sporadically. People were desperately listening but heard no economic vision or story showing where the president and the Democrats wanted to take the country. And despite the great hope for change after 2008, people could not see that anybody was battling for the middle class and American jobs; yet for Wall Street and the lobbyists, it was business as usual.
===========

This is an indirect way of saying, "Most people perceive Obama to be every bit as much in bed with the corporate and banking interests as any Republican would have been. What, really, is the difference between a Republican Hank Paulson and a Democrat Tim Geithner? They are both equally tools of the big banking interests that have wrecked the economy."

My advice (for whatever it may be worth coming from a Republican) is: Quit crying in your beer about how the Republicans are out-spending and out-Foxing you. IMO the only way you're going to beat the Republicans at the polls is to defeat their ideology:

* You've got to get over the idea that free trade is beneficial to the national economy in all circumstances. It is insane to allow an American company to put its American workers out of their jobs in order to open up an overseas subsidiary to make products with peon labor for export back into the United States. Products made in this manner should be denied entry into our market. It is also crazy for us to be buying items from overseas that we can easily make here. It is economically harmful to allow American companies to put their tech workers out of jobs because someone in the third world will do the work for peon wages. We need to compile a list of goods and services strategic to our economy and forbid their importation.

* You've got to defeat the Republican argument that raising the minimum wage "destroys jobs." You must point out that raising the minimum wage CREATES jobs by putting more money in worker's pockets, thereby allowing them to buy more goods and services. Raising the minimum wage increases DEMAND, which is the key to creating jobs.

* You've got to be willing to draft laws requiring companies pay the full costs of the unemployment they create. When companies engage in mass layoffs to inflate their profits by shifting work overseas, they undermine the entire economy. Not only is wage income lost, but federal, state, and local tax revenue is eliminated with it. Perhaps companies should be fined 10 years of lost tax revenue for every American job they send overseas. You've also got to forbid American companies from pretending that their employees are "contractors" who can be cheated out of their promised pensions and benefits.

* You've got to defeat the Republican argument that raising the income tax on high-earners harms the economy by choking off investment. The problem now is that we have too much investment and too little demand. How many more factories do we need to build when there's not enough consumer demand to keep the ones we already have in business? You've got to make the point that increasing taxes on the high-rollers is entirely appropriate. Why does a corporate raider or bank executive who thinks it's his or her business to lay people off or squander customers' money on reckless speculations need a pay raise from $50 million a year to $100 million? Impose a 70% income tax on all income over five million to discourage these 1% from looting the assets that the 99% built.

* You must restore sanity to the financial markets by intensively regulating the financial industry. The stock market is supposed to be a vehicle whereby the middle class can accumulate wealth by gradual increases in stock value over the decades. It shouldn't be the playground for investment banks and hedge funds that scam all the profits out the market with insider trading, "dark pools," and high frequency trading. Until the speculative frenzy is purged from the capital markets by force of law, they will continue to be vehicles for the DESTRUCTION of middle class wealth instead of its creation.

These are the kinds of BOLD actions that the angry middle class expects from Democrats. Forget the talking points about grandiose government-owned infrastructure that is never going to be built due to environmental red tape and lack of funding. Just get down to the business of putting money back in the middle class's pockets directly by restoring the value of their labor with a reasonable minimum wage. Get to work passing the laws that will force corporate employers to respect their workers' jobs. Give the middle class a solid footing to stand on, and they'll gladly do the work of restoring their fortunes. If you continue with the tired old "run up the public debt on education and infrastructure" talking points you might as well roll out the red carpet for President Mitt Romney and a Republican supermajority in the next Congress.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
****
"Democratic strategists and pollsters have called on the Obama campaign to change the tune of its reelection pitch, worried that the president is spending too much time rehashing the last four years and not enough time drawing a vision for the future." -- Pema Levy*
*

In a series of memos and media appearances last month, several Democrats grew weary as the campaign handled ineptly its economic message by trying to persuade people that the economy is actually improving, rather than sympathizing with their troubles. Carville and Greenberg claim that Washington and Wall Street have caused economic recovery to be slow, haunting the average American, in the middle class majority. They make the case that America's polarizing political parties, failed to show any progress to the voters, who have demonstrated their dissatisfaction.

In the heated season of presidential election, Democratic strategists James Carville and pollster Stan Greenberg's book, "It's the Middle Class, St-p-d!" presents both a harsh critique of Tea party's extreme fiscal 'austerity' policies, forced on the Republicans, and a groundwork for Democratic economic proposals. The politically motivated alternative campaign has a lot to say about a willfully determined political and media activist who rebuke and otherwise belittles America's most broad yet neglected majority.

The political duet intended to use sharp language to describe the blow Democrats received in 2010, two years after President Obama took office. They discovered, interviewing middle-class Americans, that Democrats must reframe their message, if they are eager to win the 2012 election, by direct appeal to the demographic majority. The question should be, how do we protect the 'American middle class filter, through which everything must pass? The main issue is, 'the predicament of the middle class is the only thing we're going to talk about'.

Greenberg called for further reform of the Affordable Care Act, even before the Supreme Court's decision, "We cannot afford to wait for the day when the country is so fed up... The stakes for people are too high and too immediate, not to double down on the new health care reform law" In Carville's view; it is "an area of human endeavor that is slickly superficial, obsessed with short-term gain, and pig-headedly focused on the wrong problems... for real difficulties hurting ordinary people in the flyovers."

Carville who was a vocal backer of Hillary Clinton in the 2008 primary race, is now endorsing Obama. Carville exclaims, "My biggest complaint with this president is that there's a narrative in front of him and he refuses to drive it." Is the president willing to take Carville's advice on the economy? Co-author Greenberg, writes on the 2000 election, "In the campaign's polls, we led from Labor Day to the first debate, the period that the Gore campaign waged so-called class warfare...'." He concludes, class-warfare politics can attract independent voters!
_______________________________________________________________________________________ (End)

The size of the American middle class depends on how it is defined. Various factors are often ascribed in modern usage to a middle class, whether by education, wealth, environment of upbringing, social network, manners or values, etc. These are all related, though far from deterministically dependent. The modern usage of the term middle class, however, became common during the twentieth century, in which the statistically identified middle class as that median one falling between the upper and the working class.

Included within the middle class, are most professionals, managers, and senior civil servants, but started to distinguish itself in American society after WWII. The chief defining characteristic of belonging in the middle class is some possession of significant human capital. Within capitalism, middle class initially referred to the bourgeois and lower bourgeois. However, with the growth of finance capitalism, middle class came to refer to the combination of labor aristocracy, professionals and white collar workers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 14, 2012
James Carville and Stan Greenberg get a two thumbs up! I have always loved the ol' country boy common sense that Carville uses to dissect the political BS. Our illustrious politicians and wanna be politicians obfuscate historical facts to get elected and they are hoping we are dumb enough to believe them. Jim is a U.S. treasure and is one of the few people working in the political arena that I listen to when it's time to make voting decisions in national elections. Perhaps if more people listened to these guys, our country wouldn't have borrowed gazillions from China and be required to import their cheesy products (keeping THEIR people employed)!! Thanks Jim and Stan for always telling it like it is!! I loved this book and would love to seem more from this dynamic duo.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 26, 2012
The realities of politics have shifted with the explosion of communication at every level. What I found especially interesting about the book was the reporting on a large amount of grass roots middle class polling results. Apparently the vast middle class knows a whole lot more about what is really going on than they did in the not too distant past. This alters the impact of mad dog media ads full of half sentence misleading quotes, unsupported "promises", and blatant lies. I suspect that these old tactics actually damage a candidate now.

The obvious conclusion is that if the middle class wakes up, a Republican platform espousing tax breaks for the rich and penalizing the vast middle class is doomed to failure.

If Democrats focus on issues that affect the middle class and offer plausible solutions to those issues the Republican attack ads and lack of specific plans to resolve middle class issues will work against them at the polls.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2012
Do not consider myself very political but this was an interesting book with many graphs to support the arguments raised and it made me definately want to vote Democrat. The Democrats support the middle class more than the Republicans. The middle class is the backbone of the country we need to support the middle class.
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on August 30, 2012
This is a thought-provoking discussion of how the Middle Class has been in long-term decline for three decades. The key idea is that recovery from the 2008 Financial Collapse is insufficient as the goal. When President Obama talks about getting jobs back from that Collapse, the Middle Class doesn't applaud. Instead it asks, "What kind of jobs?" This is the question because many in the Middle Class were suffering before the Collapse. They were suffering because their jobs were no longer making Middle Class life possible. The wages were too low to support the house, the two cars (which two working parents need), healthcare, and college for the kids.

So, the Middle Class borrowed to pay the mortgage, a big contributor to the 2008 Collapse.

This book really hammers home that re-building the Middle Class should be the goal. It presents the polling evidence that this is how the Middle Class looks at the situation. 75% of Americans consider themselves part of the Middle Class. So, this is a view to take note of.

However, this book doesn't present the whole picture. Middle Class income hasn't declined in the last 30 years; it's increased slightly. If that's the case, what is really causing the decline of the Middle Class? The dissatisfaction with income growth relative to that of the 1% ? (The disparity is outrageous.) Soaring medical and college costs relative to minor increases in Middle Class incomes? Unmet Middle Class desires for bigger houses, bigger cars, more electronics, more bling? Cultural changes, rather than economic ones, such as lower marriage rates?

This book is a lot like one of the two authors, James Carville. Insightfully brilliant and effective, loud-mouthed, and brash. The editing job fits James Carville well, too, somewhat rough around the edges. However, it changed how I see the world, explained a lot of today's unfathomable political landscape, and raised even more questions about what is happening in the Middle Class.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon August 5, 2012
It's the Middle Class, Stupid! by James Carville and Stan Greenberg

"It's the Middle Class, Stupid!" is the timely book that provides the Democratic Party blueprint for this election year 2012. It's an accessible book that emphasizes that this campaign should be mainly about the future of the forgotten middle-class. High-energy political guru James Carville and well known pollster Stan Greenberg join forces in a back and forth discussion about the middle class and this upcoming elections. The book starts off a little slowly but picks up to eventually become an entertaining read. This 336-page book is composed of nineteen chapters and a notes sections that links well in the Kindle version.

Positives:
1. Topical book, just in time before the elections.
2. Engaging, well-written, well-researched book that is accessible to the masses.
3. Many election topics of interest discussed.
4. Good use of charts and references to back arguments. One of my favorites: The Sane World vs. the Fog Machine.
5. The impact of politics on the middle class. The main focus of this book.
6. The contrast between Clinton's and Bush's presidency as it relates to the middle class.
7. The importance of education and the factors undermining it.
8. A look at the "fog machine" and how it works to deny. Great examples: Climate-change.
9. What voters feel strongly about according to surveys and how politicians must take such findings into account. Interesting.
10. The reality of inequality. The policies that have worked. "We want a government that works for the 80 percent, not the 1 percent".
11. Laying out the best strategy for America. The right approach to telling the middle class story.
12. A look at what's wrong with the Ryan budget. The impact to Medicare.
13. The ways to reduce the impact of big money.
14. A great discussion on health care. The importance of reducing health care costs. Solid points.
15. Developments that marginalized the middle class. What can be done about it.
16. A look at the authors' tax code proposal.
17. How to rebuild and strengthen our own economy and society so that the middle class gains. The government's role.
18. A new approach on energy. The future of energy.
19. The impact of China.
20. Links worked great!

Negatives:
1. The book focuses on general discussions about the middle class but doesn't go into much depth. So if you are looking for an in-depth discussion this is not the book for you.
2. Of course there is liberal bias. I think the authors were fairly reasonable but then again, I am in agreement with a lot of their philosophy.
3. There are many books that cover this topic at least as well.
4. The authors' are in general agreement so the book lacks that friction or controversy that helps generate buzz.
5. The book rarely goes over controversial topics in any depth: gay rights, abortion, separation of church and state, immigration, etc...

In summary, this is a 3.5 star book. It starts off a little slow going over the authors' backgrounds and the reason for writing this book, eventually the book takes off and covers all matters relating to the middle class and the importance of this upcoming election. Carville and Greenberg provide many sound reasons for their arguments but are usually on the same page. A book of this nature would probably have more public appeal if say they were on opposing sides of the issues. Be that as it may, I enjoyed the informal conversation and would recommend this to anyone interested in the suggested blueprint for the 2012 elections.

Further suggestions: "Screwed: The Undeclared War Against the Middle Class" by Thom Hartmann,"War on the Middle Class: How the Government, Big Business, and Special Interest Groups Are Waging War on the American Dream and How to Fight Back" by Lou Dobbs,"The Post-American World" by Fareed Zakaria, "Energy for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines" by Richard Muller, "End This Depression Now!" by Paul Krugman, "That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back" by Thomas Friedman, "Beyond Outrage: What Has Gone Wrong with Our Economy and Our Democracy, and How to Fix Them" by Robert B. Reich, "Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer--and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class" by Jacob S. Hacker, "The Monster: How a Gang of Predatory Lenders and Wall Street Bankers Fleeced America--and Spawned a Global Crisis" by Michael W. Hudson, "Perfectly Legal: The Covert Campaign to Rig Our Tax System to Benefit the Super Rich--and Cheat Everybody Else" by David Cay Johnston, "The Republican Brain: The Science of Why They Deny Science- and Reality" by Chris Mooney and "The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street" by Robert Scheer.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 13, 2012
If you're tired of hearing the right-wing amnesiacs and revisionists ranting on and on about "how President Obama's policies are wrecking the country," pick up Carville and Greenberg's It's The Middle Class Stupid! as soon as possible. It's an easy read with specific recommendations for what we, as a nation, need to do to reclaim the American Dream for most if not all Americans -- not just the rich and powerful. Those on the right confound the rest of us -- the authors included -- with their obliviousness to reality. They vote against their own interests when sending right-wing "reformers" to Washington. They ignore the simple fact that unless the middle class -- the vast majority of Americans -- can afford to buy "things," we'll never dig out of the hole Dubya and Company put us in. Carville and Greenberg deliver the hard facts with little if any embellishment. Their vision of the future should resonate with everyone who believes our best years are still ahead and that our children and grandchildren will be able to do better than we have. It IS about the middle class, not the big corporations and certainly not the multi-millionaires and billionaires who probably never have to worry about getting their heat shut off in the winter! Common sense, well delivered!
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