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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
There has been a lot of water over the dam since the introduction of MIDI as a protocol for recording and controlling electronic (and some not-so-electronic) instruments. The average musician has gone from completely computer illiterate to technically adept at living in a specialized world where the gut strings are cables and the voices come from chips. All of this has greatly empowered the players and composers who can work with these building blocks.
But truth is that, for many musicians MIDI is still a mystery. Something that just 'happens' when they follow the instructions in a manual, and when something doesn't happen they are lost. Despite being nearly 20 years old, MIDI for musicians is still one of the best guides for the naïve who are looking to become cognoscenti.
Anderton has written a short, to-the-point book that delves into the mysteries of the architecture of electronic instruments and their control without racing ahead of the readers ability to cope. He treats his reader as someone who is both motivated and intelligent, fearlessly broaching some complicated topics and dicing them up into digestible components.
He moves steadily from what is happening in the wires to presenting a strong overview of the potential resources available to the musician. Recommended for both novices and journeymen alike.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 11, 2008
It helped me understand the history of MIDI and how and why it works the way it does.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 9, 2013
Anderton's book give us in 2013 what should be important to know for a brand new standard at the 1980s, i.e. MIDI. Although usb connections do most of the job today regarding the linkage of devices, most part of the controller numbers, notes and other sensitive parts of digital music is managed through midi without problem. The most outdated section refers to computers and sequencers from the 1980s, but even that can show us how the technology has evolved since then.
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on March 26, 2015
Didn't care for the layout of this book at all. To do what I wanted to do I didn't need a history (bad be it) lesson on Midi. The information is probably in this book but took too much effort to root it out. I am not convinced the author is a subject matter expect, and if he is, he is absolutely Einstein. For musicians wanting to add midi in their studio environment who play real instruments, this book is a struggle and perhaps dated. Overall, not worth the time to read nor understand. I would not buy this book again if the one I have burned in a fire.
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3 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on October 1, 2007
Although I appreciated the one review given here, when I checked the copyright date (1986) I decided not to buy it. 21 years ago in computer (and MIDI) time is ancient history. Am looking for a more up-to-date book.
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