Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on April 26, 2014
I am at 34 year old business owner with a two year old struggling with how to find balance. It has been a great reminder that being home with my kids doesn't have to define my entire life. Also, I am lucky to have the flexibility of being self- employed, now it's time to take it to the next level. Sadly, I haven't seen much cultural or political change in the decade since this book was published, I sincerely hope things will be different for my daughter and I will do my best to instill realistic ideals about life, love and happiness.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 17, 2013
This book has done a good job of researching and analyzing what happens to women around 30. It was a very inspiring book and gave many testimonies of women who reached a point in there life where they were satisfied and decided to make drastic changes. I find the book a must read for anyone who has no one to talk/relate to about there "mid-life crisis". It made me feel better knowing other women have been in a similar situation around age 30 and went on to launch powerful businesses, started families, and balanced out every category in there life- while they created there own definition for themselves "I can have it all" and what does that look like as an individual
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 29, 2012
I was given this book as a gift on my 30th birthday. I could barely get through it before donating it to Goodwill. It takes a very singular look at turning 30 and being a women. I found the examples to be a bit unrealistic and unable to capture what real women face in their careers, marriage, and family life. It makes assumptions about "modern" women and the "what to do about it" in the title is quit misleading. Perhaps this book is appropriate for 5% of females.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on March 4, 2008
we need to be careful not to perpetuate or buy into the stereotypes or crises, particularly, about women approaching 30. some authors over-exaggerate the negative aspects in the attempt to stand out, make their research appear more meaningful and/or purposeful- to become a hero- at the subject's expense. there are TONS of 25-35 year old women who live in the moment, enjoy life, and are not filled with this "angst". this is how these self-fulfilling prophecies are fueled. 30-something women begin to believe they should worry because society expects them to.

it seems that there is some envy of this age group that is motivating this negative analysis as well. as a 29 year old woman i do not appreciate the larger society's expectation that somehow i should be fearful or apprehensive of the future in any of these ways. this book, released into the larger society, reinforces those expectations. it is not appreciated. i love my life, my age, and my positive outlook on life and most importantly, my gratitude for living, attracts positive things into my life.

i remain thankful for these blessings. i would encourage people who are having doubts to practice gratitude. it helps me immensely.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
My daughter, not yet 26, suggested that her Mom, not yet 55, should read the book to understand some of her concerns and issues. I laughed when she said the words "mid life crisis", although now that I think back nearly 3 decades and recall that at 26, I was seriously questioning my life's path also.

I raced through the book in one weekend as if it were a homework assignment. The authors struck a chord with their comments on the lessons that we Baby Boomer moms taught our daughters: "Anything is Possible", "You Can Have it All", "Waiting to Marry is the Divorce Insurance Policy", etc. We feminists burned our bras, rallied for change in the corporation, assaulted the glass ceiling, brought home the bacon and fried it up in the pan.

But not all of us had it all, and the unachievable goal of having a Perfect Life has created Alpha Moms, Martha Stewart-esque Domestic Goddesses, pervasive anxiety, and, according to the authors, melt-down among this striving generation. Achieving education, career, marriage, and children doesn't happen for everyone at the right time in a strictly linear fashion (or at all).

Part One of the book defines why this generation is so stressed, redefines the new glass ceiling, discusses how "happily ever after" needs to be revised, and describes how all of this change is affecting men. This section of the book was most useful and interesting to me, and can best be summed up by "each woman will have her own definition of having it all".

Part Two offered profiles of successful women at 30 and later in life, with the suggestion that their experiences could be used as a sort of virtual mentoring. The subjects of the profiles were many high-achieving women in medicine, publishing, entertainment, politics, law and business. While the stories of each woman's journey through career, marriage and children (or the decision to not have children) were interesting, laudable and inspirational, they didn't seem particularly applicable to the typical middle-class young woman. There just isn't enough room at the top for every striving young woman to find a place there.

The value of this book will be its contribution to the ongoing dialogue that young women need to have among themselves, with their spouses and bosses, (and even with their Baby boomer moms...), to help them chart a course to success and happiness through the years that are filled with challenges and choices.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 31, 2006
30 is the new benchmark of where are you in life. This places enormous pressure on people as young as 17 or 18 to get into gear before they even know who they are. With the average post-secondary graduating age around 22 ... that is less than a decade for women (more pressure than men) to begin having something to show for themselves. Life can be navigated but there are factors beyond one's control. No wonder the rat race is so compelling to teenagers.... you are behind before you even get started. Isn't life something to enjoy at least some of the time. Excellent analysis of why the world (at least in the West) has only gotten more unrealistic and disregarded the need for young people to just be happy some of the time that they are alive and well.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2006
This book is for women who have or want to have children. Period. I am 29 years old, and do not hear a biological clock ticking. In fact, the older I get, the less I want children. I knew the book would touch on motherhood, but I was hoping it wasn't the main drive of the book. Instead I read page after page of women whining about how to juggle a career and a family. If that is something you're struggling with, then by all means, get this book. If you're not thinking about motherhood, and especially if you are child-free by choice, don't waste your time.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on December 29, 2005
I loved this book, but the title is really misleading. Makes it sound like a self-help book and I really don't think it is. A friend recommended this otherwise I probably wouldn't have picked it up based on the title.

Provided a lot of interesting perspectives on the struggles both women AND men go through in our society when trying to maintain a work/life balance. Doesn't really provide any guidance, but does make you realize that this is a social problem, not just a personal problem. I've recommended it to many friends.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on September 7, 2005
Since I just turned 30, I enjoyed reading the book. It was well organized with majority of the focus on women executives and women with high end careers that would naturally put a lot of stress in personal decision making. I like the blurb on what that person was doing at 30 and what the person is currently doing (in her 40's-50's). It would have been nice for the wirters: Lia Macko & Kerry Rubin to provide details and exercises for the reader on really trying to transform your life at 30. However, they would probably need a PhD to dispense in depth ways to deal with a midlife crisis at 30.

Each midlife crisis is different, but at times, some of the reading was superfical. For me, a true midlife crisis is being diagnosed and undergoing chemotherapy at 30, or losing one of your children (if you have any) at 30.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on May 26, 2005
While this is an excellant book if you are a career woman, the authors make one huge mistake. They write that a woman's life phases follows this order 1.Work 2.Marriage 3.Kids. They never met me, because my life has followed this order. 1.Kid 2.Marriage 3.Work? I write work with a question mark because I am a 29 year old stay-at-home mother who realizes that I should have gone to college and had a career too. I didn't go to college because I got pregnant and married when I was 18 (and had three more children over the years) and have been a homemaker ever since. Now as I approach 30, I find myself yearning for a career, not a baby. I did find the story about Judy Blume inspiring because she was a stay-at-home mom at thirty and later became a writer. I am an aspiring writer as well. But the rest of the book just wasn't what I was looking for.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Midlife Crisis at 30
Midlife Crisis at 30 by Lia Macko (Paperback - February 22, 2005)


30 Things to Do When You Turn 30
30 Things to Do When You Turn 30 by Chris Taylor (Paperback - October 21, 2008)
$14.09
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations