Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Midnight Hour Encores Paperback


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.94 $0.01 $2.95

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen; Reprint edition (April 15, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064470210
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064470216
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,096,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A symphony waiting to be heard by the right audience, this is Bruce Brooks's most challenging yet overlooked novel. Sibilance is a smart, well-adjusted musical prodigy with a father who adores her and gives her plenty of freedom. Sounds like a perfect life, doesn't it? However, even gifted teenagers need to break away to find their own independence. The marvel here is the way Brooks creates an authentic rite of passage for this complex, witty young woman. How do we move from the warm safety of love into deeper love? Brooks knows the way.

From School Library Journal

Grade 9-12 In The Moves Make the Man (Harper, 1984), Brooks used basketball as a metaphor to simplify his philosophical discussion and as a vehicle for unforgettably vivid writing; here he uses music for similar purposes. Although Sib, 16, has not seen her mother since the day she was born, she suddenly announces that she'd like to. She has an ulterior motive, but that's her style; a musical prodigy, she is ruthless, manipulative, indecently self-assured, impatient of others' flaws. Her father, Taxi, has his own style, and he takes her on a trip both actual and figurative, across the country, and back 15 years. He wants Sib to understand the spirit that captured her mother and him during the late 1960s; consequently, they travel in a 20-year-old VW bus, Taxi sings and speaks of that era at every opportunity, and he takes Sib to meet some of his old acquaintances on the way. Sib's mother turns out to be a wealthy real-estate agent with expensive tastes and no interest in music, quite comfortable in an upper-class milieu of money and power. Brooks plainly has points to make about the '60s and what happened to its survivors; by presenting Sib with such clear-cut alternatives, thoughbetween her mother, successful but hollow, and her father, an environmentalist whose idealism is battered but intacthe suggests that there is no middle ground. However simplistic his social theory, Brooks is a genuine storyteller, with fine dramatic sense and excellent comic timing. Like Moves , this is full of memorable scenes and magic moments, especially when music is being played or heard. Teenage readers may have trouble keeping up with Sib and Taxi as they skip from Haydn to Ellington to Shostakovich to Procol Harum, from new cadenzas to old riffs with the ease of long familiarity, but the author rewards the effort with a stimulating, thought-provoking tale. John Peters, New York Public Library
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
I had to read this book as an English assignment and to tell you the truth I thought it was going to suck. But, when I read the first paragraph, I had the sudden feeling that this book was going to be different. I took it home and read and read. I couldn't seem to put it down. I immediately fell in love with Sib and the way she looked at things in her life. She has alot of character and looks at the world the same way an intelligent 16 year old does (trust me I know this since I too am 16). She reminded me of myself in a way. I loved this book and would recommend it to anyone. I am even planning on reading it again. It was great!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
Midnight Hour Encores is one of those rare books that can keep the reader captivated for hours on end. I have read this book 4 times, and each time it holds a new excitment and discovery. Being a young female violinist that most people regard as a very unusual musician I really came to an understanding with the sarcastic Sibilance. I would recommend this book to anyone, not just young adults.
P.S. My mother read this book and instantly fell in love
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
I thought it was one of the greatest story I've ever read.Although I don't play cello myself, I play a string instrument and was delighted at sib's personality.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 1998
Format: Paperback
Sibilance T. Spooner is not your ordinary seventeen year old. She is known all over the world as being one of the best cellists of her time. Her father, Taxi, is a single parent trying to raise a teenage girl all by himself. In a quest to find herself as well as her mother, Taxi and Sib embark on a cross-country trip that leads to the past, and helps Sib find her way through the future. With the feeling of unsatisfaction in her life, Sib feels that she needs to be on her own to make her own decisions for once. And even though her mother may be a Porsche, she finds her way back to the Volkswagon bus that is her father.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 13, 1997
Format: Paperback
Midnight Hour Encores is an excellent story about a teenage cellist, Sibilance. Abandoned by her mother at a young age, she and her father, Taxi, have been doing just fine for many years. But when Sibilance decides that she wants to meet her mother, they embark on a journey across the country. Not knowing what they will find, Taxi spends the trip trying to explain things he doesn't know himself. This book has an excellent plot and fascinating characters, but is definitely more enjoyable to people who have an appreciation and understanding of music and musical terms.

-LJ
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa94874ec)