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Miles Lassiter (circa 1777-1850): An Early African-American Quaker from Lassiter Mill, Randolph County, North Carolina: My Research Journey to Home Kindle Edition

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Length: 150 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Margo Lee. Williams was born in New York. She holds an MA in Sociology and an MA in Religious Education.. She developed an interest in genealogy early in life, but only after moving to Washington DC did she actively pursue family research. In the 30+ years since, she has researched and written extensively on her family. She is a well-known lecturer for the Family History Centers of the LDS Church in the Washington, DC area, a former editor of the Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and through her private research company, Personal Prologue, has developed expertise in identifying heirs for intestate probates. She is currently a National Service Officer with Vietnam Veterans of America. She lives in Silver Spring, Maryland with her daughter, Turquoise Williams.

Product Details

  • File Size: 6029 KB
  • Print Length: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Backintyme (November 7, 2011)
  • Publication Date: November 7, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0064FITWQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #957,810 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

I've researched and written extensively on my Lassiter family, including this recently published book, Miles Lassiter (circa 1777-1850), an Early African American Quaker from Lassiter Mill, Randolph County, North Carolina: My Research Journey to Home. I am a frequent lecturer for the Family History Centers in the Washington, DC area, a former editor of the Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and have my own private research company, Personal Prologue. I frequently research heirs for intestate probates.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I would urge anyone who has an interest in history and research to read this book. Margo Lee Williams has manage to take a journey of discovery via the oral history traditions of African Americans combined with research. Starting with stories her mother told her as a youth, she has managed to unearthed a treasure-trove of family history which also gave insight into one of a few African American Quakers in the South.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One thing that mortality teaches us is that we will not live forever. Usually it takes the searing process of life experiences to brand this truth upon our consciousness, a fact that usually comes like an awakening. It seems it takes some of us getting older, or the illness of an older relative, as a catalyst for us to want to know more about our family, to the point where we actually do research. I say all of this as personal introduction to Ms. Margo Lee Williams work on the Lassiter Family because I am not quite sure if this is how the process worked for her, though it does, for many.
Part of Ms. Williams motivation comes from the fact that her immediate family moved North, taking them away from, and separating them for a number of years from their roots. Ms. Williams begins her search trying to reconnect with her roots and flesh out her family history. This is a fascinating odyssey as she explains it, taking her into all kinds of family records. Ms. Williams balances this story with some emotion, in a clear and logical manner, leaving one ready to discover what she finds next. The book takes her back four generations to her descendent Miles Lassiter and the land that comes down from him. In the process, one learns some of what life was like for African-Americans in Randolph County in the state of North Carolina. Ms. Williams tells this story in a clear and cogent manner that not only makes her family proud, but anyone (such as myself), who has African-American roots within the county. I think it is quite humorous that Ms. Williams' mother attended First Congregational United Church of Christ in Asheboro as a little girl. I find that humorous because there is a picture of it in Ms Williams' book and because it is the church that I grew up in. See there, connections all around!
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