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Miles in Love (Miles Vorkosigan Series) Paperback – February 5, 2008


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Product Details

  • Series: Miles Vorkosigan Series
  • Paperback: 880 pages
  • Publisher: Baen (February 5, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416555471
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416555476
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #295,531 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

Author's Note:
 
The Vorkosigan Saga Reading Order Debate: The Chef Recommends
 
 
Many pixels have been expended debating the 'best' order in which to read what have come to be known as the Vorkosigan Books, the Vorkosiverse, the Miles books, and other names, since I neglected to supply the series with a label myself.  The debate now wrestles with some fourteen or so volumes and counting, and mainly revolves around publication order versus internal-chronological order.  I favor internal chronological, with a few caveats.
 
I have always resisted numbering my volumes; partly because, in the early days, I thought the books were distinct enough; latterly because if I ever decided to drop in a prequel somewhere (which in fact I did most lately with Captain Vorpatril's Alliance) it would upwhack the numbering system.  Nevertheless, the books and stories do have a chronological order, if not a strict one.
 
It was always my intention to write each book as a stand-alone so that the reader could theoretically jump in anywhere, yes, with that book that's in your hand right now, don't put it back on the shelf!  While still somewhat true, as the series developed it acquired a number of sub-arcs, closely related tales that were richer for each other.  I will list the sub-arcs, and then the books, and then the caveats.
 
Shards of Honor and Barrayar.  The first two books in the series proper, they detail the adventures of Cordelia Naismith of Beta Colony and Aral Vorkosigan of Barrayar.  Shards was my very first novel ever; Barrayar was actually my eighth, but continues the tale the next day after the end of Shards.  For readers who want to be sure of beginning at the beginning, or who are very spoiler-sensitive, start with these two.
 
The Warrior's Apprentice and The Vor Game (with, perhaps, the novella "The Mountains of Mourning" tucked in between.)  The Warrior's Apprentice introduces the character who became the series' linchpin, Miles Vorkosigan; the first book tells how he created a space mercenary fleet by accident; the second how he fixed his mistakes from the first round. Space opera and military-esque adventure (and a number of other things one can best discover for oneself), The Warrior's Apprentice makes another good place to jump into the series for readers who prefer a young male protagonist.
 
After that: Brothers in Arms should be read before Mirror Dance, and both, ideally, before Memory.
 
Komarr makes another good alternate entry point for the series, picking up Miles's second career at its start.  It should be read before A Civil Campaign.
 
Borders of Infinity, a collection of three of the five currently extant novellas, makes a good Miles Vorkosigan early-adventure sampler platter, I always thought, for readers who don't want to commit themselves to length.  (But it may make more sense if read after The Warrior's Apprentice.)  Take care not to confuse the collection-as-a-whole with its title story, "The Borders of Infinity".
 
Falling Free takes place 200 years earlier in the timeline and does not share settings or characters with the main body of the series.  Most readers recommend picking up this story later. It should likely be read before Diplomatic Immunity, however, which revisits the "quaddies", a bioengineered race of free fall dwellers, in Miles's time.
 
The novels in the internal-chronological list below appear in italics; the novellas (officially defined as a story between 17,500 words and 40,000 words, though mine usually run 20k - 30k words) in quote marks.
 
 
Falling Free
Shards of Honor
Barrayar
The Warrior's Apprentice
"The Mountains of Mourning"
"Weatherman"
The Vor Game
Cetaganda
Ethan of Athos
Borders of Infinity
"Labyrinth"
"The Borders of Infinity"
Brothers in Arms
Mirror Dance
Memory
Komarr
A Civil Campaign
"Winterfair Gifts"
Diplomatic Immunity
Captain Vorpatril's Alliance  (upcoming in late 2012)
CryoBurn
                  
 
Caveats:
 
The novella "Weatherman" is an out-take from the beginning of the novel The Vor Game.  If you already have The Vor Game, you likely don't need this.
 
The original 'novel' Borders of Infinity was a fix-up collection containing the three novellas "The Mountains of Mourning", "Labyrinth", and "The Borders of Infinity", together with a frame story to tie the pieces together. Again, beware duplication.  The frame story does not stand alone, and generally is of interest only to completists.
 
 
The Fantasy Novels
 
My fantasy novels are a bit easier to order.  Easiest of all is The Spirit Ring, which is a stand-alone, or aquel, as some wag once dubbed books that for some obscure reason failed to spawn a subsequent series.  Next easiest are the four volumes of The Sharing Knife--in order, Beguilement, Legacy, Passage, and Horizon--which I broke down and actually numbered, as this was one continuous tale divided into non-wrist-breaking chunks.
 
What have come to be called the Chalion books, after the setting of its first two volumes, were also written, like the Vorkosigan books, to be stand-alones as part of a larger whole, and can in theory be read in any order.  (The third book actually takes place a few hundred years prior to the more closely connected first two.)  Some readers think the world-building is easier to assimilate when the books are read in publication order, and the second volume certainly contains spoilers for the first (but not the third.)  In any case, the publication order is:
 
The Curse of Chalion
Paladin of Souls
The Hallowed Hunt
 
Happy reading!
 
-- Lois McMaster Bujold.

About the Author

Lois McMaster Bujold is one of the most honored writers in the fields of science fiction and fantasy and has won six Hugo Awards and two Nebula Awards, including a Nebula Award for Falling Free, included in Miles and Metallurgy. She immediately attracted attention with her first novel, Shards of Honor, which began her popular Vorkosigan series, and quickly followed it up with The Warrior’s Apprentice, which introduced young Miles Vorkosigan, one of the most popular characters ever in science fiction. Her recent fantasy series for Harper-Collins has been a top seller, and its second entry, Paladin of Souls, took home her latest Hugo Award. The mother of two, Ms. Bujold lives in Minneapolis, MN.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By McQ on April 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Be warned, this is yet another compilation. I already own both novels and the short story separately, BUT I wanted to say that these are my favorite stories in the entire series. If you haven't already read these particular novels, I'd recommend this compilation.

I've been hooked on this series for years, but Komarr is my favorite novel in the entire set. (Followed closely by Shards of Honor and Barrayar which I have in the compilation Cordelia's Honor) I've read it several times. The way Miles falls in love with Ekaterin was breathtaking. I loved their scenes together. Ekaterin proves herself as a hero in both small ways and big ones. She truly is Vor and a suitable match for Miles.

A Civil Campaign has a different feel to it, but parts of it were so funny they made me laugh out loud. Bug butter. Bugs with Vorkosigan insignia on them. It also has Koudelka girls galore.

I haven't seen this printing of the short story Winterfair Gifts so I can't comment on the editing, but I highly enjoyed this story when I found it in the anthology of her short stories called Irresistible Forces. I thought the story was wonderful, even if Miles and Ekaterin weren't the main focus. I had felt cheated when the novels jumped from A Civil Campaign (before the wedding) to Diplomatic Immunity (where they're already married). I wanted to see their wedding, so was very happy when this allowed me to. I always liked Taura, so seeing her get a makeover by Aunt Alys was hysterical. It was also interesting to see behind the scenes how things worked in the manor through the eyes of one of the guards.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Joy V. Smith VINE VOICE on July 11, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This collection shows us Miles and Ekaterin meeting (Komarr), getting to know each other as Miles tries to court her (A Civil Campaign), and the wedding (Winterfair Gifts), and, of course, dealing with assorted family relationships in all the stories. I enjoyed that, plus meeting Taura again in Winterfair Gifts.

A lot more goes on in these stories than romance, of course, Miles having to deal with political problems along the way, but look at how Bujold handles Miles recounting the loves of his life to Ekaterin. None of them would marry him; they all went on to lead successful lives--so unlike her life on Komarr. The last on his list was Rian: "And what does she do now?" "Now? She's an empress." ... "Can I take a number and get in line?" ... "The next number up," he breathed, "is one."
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mom with a Kindle on June 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book contains two novels and one short story. Komaar is pretty good, and A Civil Campaign is quite possibly my favorite book ever. I own a paper copy of the books, but I got a kindle-format version via the publisher's web site. The webscriptions e-book comes in multiple formats, so it can be read on devices other than a kindle, including your computer without special software.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Seven Kitties on January 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
I save up my Vorkosigan books for when I really need a boost, because I have reasonable expectations of a great ride (Elizabeth Moon, the same thing). I was a bit hesitant to approach this one, first, because, as another reviewer said, why'd they skip _Memory_ in these omnibus reprints? And second, love and romance: not exactly this reader's cup of tea. I feared, in short, sap.

Ekaterin does seem a bit thin in _Komarr_ and she keeps falling back on that rather old misogynist trope of women completely subsuming their identities into caregivers of men, which is annoying. All that means is *I* couldn't fall in love with her. Her husband, also a thinly characterized loser/jerk, but one that's at least recognizable and consistent. This omnibus allows us to see her grow out of that, thank heavens.

As for the rest, you know what you're going to get. Plenty of political intrigue, witty dialogue, good good guys and sinister but worthy-adversary bad guy, and rabbit-punches of mayhem. The romance I'd so dreaded in _Civil Campaign_ was recognizable through both sides' complete misinterpretation of the other; a bucket of patently unsuitable suitors (I felt kinda bad for a few); and the requisite cast of staff and cupid's helpers. But there's also the insane clone, an icky bug infestation, a woman who got a full body sex change to inherit her family's property (and who flirts wildly with those who 'knew' her as a woman), Ivan being, well, Ivan, and Bujold's amazing sense of timing--she knows just when to unleash the wackiness. There's a bit less swashbuckling in this collection than I like: I still mourn the 'demise' of Admiral Naismith. But it makes up for it in intrigue and comedy. The romance is well integrated, and the sap factor not too sticky.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Miznettie on March 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I knew I was getting two previously published Miles stories when I bought this book. But I decided to buy it anyway because a. It had been a few years since I had read the stories. b. I have no idea where my copies are. and c.'Joy oh joy!' there was a short story about Miles' wedding included with the two novels.

My joy quickly turned to dismay as I began reading the wedding story. I can only surmise that the author had a deadline to meet and neither she nor an editor had time to run it through a spell or grammar checker. The typos were horrible and very distracting. Perhaps if the story had actually been more about Miles and his bride to be and less about one of the family guards I might have enjoyed it despite the grammatical errors. Or the fact that Miles' soon to be stepson had such a very tiny role in this story. Very tiny. Very, very tiny. So tiny I can't actually remember him being at the wedding.

I can recommend this book for the original Miles novels but not for the short story.
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