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Milk-Based Soaps: Making Natural, Skin-Nourishing Soap Paperback – January 9, 1997


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Milk-Based Soaps: Making Natural, Skin-Nourishing Soap + The Natural Soap Book: Making Herbal and Vegetable-Based Soaps + Milk Soapmaking: The Smart and Simple Guide to Making Lovely Milk Soap from Scratch with Cow Milk, Goat Milk, Buttermilk, Cream, Coconut Milk, or Any Other Animal or Plant Milk
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC (January 9, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0882669842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0882669847
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #671,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Learn the time-honored secrets of making moisturizing, skin-nourishing soaps with milk!

 

Create this sought-after soap at home using the specialized yet simple techniques Casey Makela has developed in more than 15 years of soapmaking. With her in-depth instructions you'll learn to:

 

* Make both vegetable- and tallow-based soaps using common ingredients and equipment

* Create classic beauty soaps, like Milk-based Oatmeal and Peaches and Cream

* Experiment with specialty soaps from the practical to the lush -- Nitty-Gritty to Romantic Rose

* Name, package, and market your soaps to turn your hobby into a money-maker!

About the Author

The experience and expertise Casey Makela has acquired through 15 years of making soaps is readily apparent in her book, Milk-Based Soaps. She is the owner of Killmaster Soap & Woolen Works, a gift shop and direct mail business. Besides raising dairy goats, Casey has written articles for various animal husbandry periodicals. She resides in Harrisville, Michigan, with her husband and seven children.

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Customer Reviews

The best soapmaking book I have ever bought is "The Everything Soapmaking Book" by Alicia Grosso.
Skye
It, along with several others, were great resources for expanding my knowledge and technique with soapmaking.
Living it up
It was very informative and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in learning how to make soap.
Mary J. Rendon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

119 of 119 people found the following review helpful By S. McKinney on July 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you are an inexperienced soapmaker and you read this book, I think it is probably going to scare you to death. You'll drop the book and run away screaming and never give another instant of thought to making milk soaps. MILK-BASED SOAPS was an informative book and I feel that it taught me some useful things (I have my own soapmaking business), but I was making goats' milk soaps long before I read this book and it just isn't as hard as she makes it sound, I promise.

I was really, really puzzled by Makela's instruction to cool the milk/lye mixture down to 80 degrees F while having the fats/oils at 120 degrees F and THEN mixing the two together. She says in the book that the milk/lye mixture will want to keep separating and falling to the bottom of the pot while you stir -- there's a reason for that, you know. It's because there is not enough 'synergy' between these two substances that are being combined at such wildly disparate temperatures. You know what? I bring my milk/lye mixture and my fats/oils mixture both to 110 degrees F for a 6 pound batch of soap and I have NEVER had any trouble. And I do NOT use all the multiple pots and blenders to scoop the raw soap back and forth, etc. I use one heavy stainless steel pot, one sturdy plastic Rubbermaid pitcher for the lye/milk and one stick blender. This does not have to be a group effort. Makela tends to make this sound as if you need a tag team of willing friends dressed in Haz-Mat suits standing at the ready to assist you in your time of need.

Truly. I make this soap all by myself. I do it all the time. It only has to be a big hairy deal if you intentionally make it that way.
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
It seems that there was some extremely important information missing! She says that you can change the kinds of oils you use, but failed to provide any kind of lye calculation chart which is critical to making safe soap. She also doesn't explain why she uses some of the ingredients she uses. She says to add Borax to water if you don't have soft water, but why does she want you to add it to the milk? Sugar and glycerin. Are they mandatory??? And why the sugar? What does it do? I appreciated the information as far as keeping the milk cool, and the best way to work with it so it doesn't get scorched, but her recipies are too big to use, and she doesn't include either palm or coconut oil which is a basic staple of all soap. Is either oil not recommended for milk based soaps? There are just too many gaps!!!
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By B. Tackitt on January 18, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the better books I've read so far. The recipes are large, but the first few batches you make will probably be given away, so these are big enough for you to keep some as well as give away.
The history given is helpful, it was a pleasure to read. As for the methods she uses with the blender, it is alot of work, but it is faster than stirring by hand. Personally, I use my stick blender, less work all around.
It is not nessasary to use palm or coconut oils in soap, and they aren't even the base for all soaps as another reviewer wrote. My best soaps have olive oil as the base and no coconut or palm at all.

Milk soaps aren't for someone completely new to soapmaking.. try making basic soaps first. The recipes are all over the internet, but this book is easy enough to follow that someone who has been making soaps for a month or two will have no problems following it. Actually someone who has never made soap would be able to follow it, but a little experience before trying something that is tricky like milk soaps, wouldn't hurt.
Overall, for the money spent this book is worth it. Much more detailed and well thought out than another soapmaking book I read recently.
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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Denise Lambert Skeen on April 13, 2000
Format: Paperback
The recipes are good, but too many of my questions remain unanswered (and I have been making soap for 10 years). Like why put so little honey in the honey and milk soap? And why is sugar an ingredient in the basic recipe? What purpose does it serve? What is the purpose of encouraging experimentation and then not giving enough information to experiment wisely? She says to do something or not do something without giving specific reasons all too often.
I learned to make soap from Carla Emory's book, _Encylopedea of Country Living_ and the information there was much more sketchy than this. Still, I like it better in that it is at least sharing all it knows, while I feel the author of this little book is holding back what might well be the most vital information.
I like some of her ideas but I'm not sure it was worth the money. I suppose the method of handling the milk was worth it though as to make milk soap was why I bought it.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Skye on September 30, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked Caseys recipes but..it was almost tiring just reading her instructions,like...start with this pan,then put the mixture in that pan...then stir both pans at the same time.I make and mix my soap in one pan,it's really not that difficult.I agree with another reviewer who said it does'nt have to be a team effort.The best soapmaking book I have ever bought is "The Everything Soapmaking Book" by Alicia Grosso. This book has all the information you will ever need to make really beautiful handmade soap.
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