Miller's Crossing 1990 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(333) IMDb 7.9/10
Available in HD

When gangsters begin to feud over a bookie during Prohibition, one man tries to keep the peace and finds himself caught in the middle of a war of shifting allegiances.

Starring:
Albert Finney, Gabriel Byrne
Runtime:
1 hour 55 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Introducing Amazon Fire TV

Watch Amazon Instant Video and more on your HDTV with Amazon Fire TV. Use voice search to instantly find TV shows, movies, actors, directors, and genres. Learn more

Miller's Crossing

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller
Director Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring Albert Finney, Gabriel Byrne
Supporting actors John Turturro, Jon Polito, J.E. Freeman, Albert Finney, Mike Starr, Al Mancini, Richard Woods, Thomas Toner, Steve Buscemi, Mario Todisco, Olek Krupa, Michael Jeter, Lanny Flaherty, Jeanette Kontomitras, Louis Charles Mounicou III, John McConnell, Danny Aiello III, Helen Jolly
Studio Fox
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

This film has to be one of the best that has ever been made.
Weltsprache
If you're looking for a great crime film with a story, interesting characters, and an overwhelming plot, this is the one to see.
Michael Crane
It has great shots, great plot, great dialogue, great acting, and a great score.
M. M. Davis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

189 of 203 people found the following review helpful By "captlauro" on January 4, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Yes, FARGO won lots of awards, and sure, RAISING ARIZONA isuproariously funny, but make no mistake: MILLER'S CROSSING is thequintessential Coen brothers film. In point of fact, it's flawless, a jewel you can turn over and around in your hands again and again, seeing a new facet every time, each one striking and smooth and perfect.
The script is awash with Prohibition-era jargon both historically grounded and whimsically invented, a symphony of phrases and exchanges that linger and echo long after being heard. (It isn't unusual after a viewing to walk around asking friends, "What's the rumpus?", or to complain about being given "the high hat" upon being snubbed.)
The performances, as well, are individually and collectively irresistable. I defy you, in fact, to find a single film in which _any_ of the major players has ever been better. There's not a false or miscast note in the whole of the dramatis personae. There's Gabriel Byrne as the inscrutable, Machiavellian Tom Reagan, a trusted advisor to the city's Irish mob lord who falls out of favor and "defects" to the Italian camp to save his own skin...or does he? Albert Finney plays Leo, the aforementioned Irish power broker whose fists of iron, vicious survival instinct, and all-too-vulnerable heart congeal into a simply remarkable, unforgettable character. John Turturro is equal parts pathetic outcast and conniving opportunist as Bernie Birnbaum, the unscrupulous, vampirically pale bookmaker whose shady maneuvers set the whole plot into motion. Marcia Gay Harden exudes fierce intelligence and buckets of carefully-aimed sex appeal as Bernie's sister Verna, whose unflagging drive to protect her brother -- even from himself -- almost excuse her twisted machinations. J.E.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
58 of 63 people found the following review helpful By JOEL D. GERSHBEIN on April 11, 2000
Most people will let the titles "GOODFELLAS", "THE GODFATHER (I & II)", "ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA" and "THE UNTOUCHABLES" roll off their tongues when asked what their favorite movie is in the "mob" genre. Although seldom mentioned, "MILLER'S CROSSING" must take its rightful place alongside the above as one of the definitive treatments of gangster dynamics in American Cinema. I like to call it "The Thinking Man's Mob Movie" because it's a film that requires one to really focus on the action and dialog and not merely sit back in a lounger without attention span and wait for kill. These characters are multi-faceted, the plot is complex and the payoff for the viewer is delivered through outstanding cinematography (perhaps the Coen's best!) and skillful pacing. Coupling their usual stable of actors (Turturro, Buscemi, Polito) with veteran thespo Albert Finney, the exquisitely laconic Gabriel Byrne, and femme-semi-fatale Marcia Gay Harden, the Coen Brothers have assembled a truly great ensemble cast that transcends the brutality and authenticity of the era. Sure, there's great kill! In the good gangster pictures, violence is actually a character unto itself, always lurking in the background until called upon to make a point. In "MILLER'S CROSSING", the Coen Brothers seem to downplay the actual mechanical violence by isolating the factors and sequences that are responsible for it. Betrayal and revenge are important themes in this film. The crisp writing makes the conversation between characters appear effortless and uncontrived. There's a certain casuality in the dialog that belies the Coen's alarmingly accurate renderings of gangland execution.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Dan Thron on January 23, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
As it's chilly performances and aloof style put the audience at a distance, it's hard to see the first time through what a brilliant film this picture is; but repeated veiwings have only cemented my opinion--Miller's Crossing is the finest American film since Raging Bull.
I think the key to my love for Miller's, though, is realizing what what I believe the dream-hat meant (I'm sure this will be obvious to some, especially those that have watched a number of times, but I just want to throw this out there for folks that have seen it, but don't know what all the hubbub is about--because certainly, that's how I felt when I first saw it).
Whether people wear hats or not in the film seems to represent whether they are acting out of passion-from the heart, that is, or out of mind--thinking logically, or unemotionally.
Tom's conflict in the film is entirely between his head and his heart(Verna). He loses his hat to Verna in a poker game, and he goes back to her apartment to get it--and it is left on the sill while they fool around. And Tom says about his dream: "There's nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat." Ultimately, Tom chooses mind over heart in the end--or does he? The final shot shows him methodically putting his hat on so low that we can't even see his eyes, so he seems to make the cold choice of pure logic--but then, as he looks after Leo leaving (Leo, who has been hatless throughout, pure emotion, has now learned something--and he is wearing a yarmulke), the camera sneaks in under the brim of Tom's hat to see his eyes. It is rare for a movie to understand its character's so well. Wonderful filmmaking
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0x9e6f6f9c)