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Million Dollar Baby (Two-Disc Widescreen Edition)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Hilary Swank, Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Joe D'Angerio, Morgan Eastwood
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: July 12, 2005
  • Run Time: 132 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (660 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005JNP1
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #88,629 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Million Dollar Baby (Two-Disc Widescreen Edition)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • James Lipton Takes on Three: 25-minute roundtable with Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank, Morgan Freeman, and moderator James Lipton
  • Born to Fight: examines the parallels of the movie to real-life boxer Lucia Rijker
  • Producers Round 15: behind the scenes

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

"I DON'T TRAIN GIRLS", trainer Frankie Dunn growls. But something's different about the spirited boxing hopeful who shows up daily at Dunn's gym. All she wants is a fighting chance. Clint Eastwood plays Dunn and directs, produces and composes music for this acclaimed, multi-award-winning tale of heart, hope and family. Hilary Swank plays resilient Maggie, determined not to abandon her one dream. And Morgan Freeman is Scrap, gym caretaker and counterpoint to Dunn's crustiness. Grab your dreams and come out swinging.

DVD Features:
Documentaries
Featurette
Interviews

Additional Features

The second DVD of Million Dollar Baby offers just under an hour of bonus material. In the 19-minute "Born to Fight," the cast discusses women boxers. It's fairly routine, except that cast member Lucia Rijker, who played Billie the Blue Bear, is a real-life boxer some of whose experiences mirrored those of Maggie Fitzgerald in the film. There's also 13 minutes of interviews with the film's producers, and a 24-minute roundtable in which James Lipton interviews Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank, and Morgan Freeman. All displaying their Oscar statuettes, they discuss Eastwood's directorial style, the craft of acting, and Freeman's dance background. For whatever reason, throughout the bonus features the central issue of the film's final act is briefly acknowledged, but not discussed. --David Horiuchi

Customer Reviews

It was a good movie with a really sad ending.
DKW
It won best picture, best actress for Hilary Swank, best supporting actor for Morgan Freeman and best director for Clint Eastwood and absolutely deservedly so.
Chet Fakir
As a director, Eastwood has proven with films like Unforgiven and Mystic River that he has a strong, disciplined vision.
C. Tsao

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

338 of 393 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Appleseed VINE VOICE on December 25, 2004
Hillary Swank (Margaret Fitzgerald), who proved her athleticism in her first major role, The Next Karate Kid, demonstrated it again, pummeling a heavy bag with a power left on which I wouldn't want to be on the receiving end. She's very convincing in this movie - both as a young woman from humble beginnings who wants to make a better life for herself, and as a boxer. In Million Dollar Baby, she returns to the visceral emotional range that left us so deeply moved in Boy's Don't Cry.

Clint Eastwood (Frankie Dunn), who has proved himself repeatedly, has perhaps turned in the best performance of his career. At times irascible, intellectual, mournful, instructive, reflective, passionate - in every manifestation, he reaches you. He was brilliant.

And Morgan Freeman is, well, Morgan Freeman. As the narrator of the story, and an actor within it, he lends a soft-spoken touch that ameliorates some of the film's darker elements. He also lent the film a certain amount of boxing sagacity, as he spoke in non-technical and sometimes quasi-technical terms of the basics of boxing.

This film ain't no Rocky. It has an intelligence and compassion that Rocky (and virtually every boxing film ever made, save perhaps Raging Bull) couldn't think to have. Beyond that, it actually has better fight sequences. More often than in most boxing films - certainly the very poor choreography of the Rocky fight sequences - the punches looked and felt real, or as real as "fake" can make them.

Margaret introduces herself to Frankie after a fight and asks him to train her. He turns her down flat, saying that he doesn't train girls. Given her pluckiness, she appears at his gym the next day, punching a heavy bag with all of the skill, style and fluidity of Pinocchio.
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144 of 184 people found the following review helpful By MICHAEL ACUNA on January 9, 2005
Frankie Dunn (Clint Eastwood) is "the best cut man in the business' intones the narrator, Morgan Freeman in "Million Dollar Baby." Frankie can clean up a cut in seconds so that a fighter can get back in the ring and at the very least finish the fight and at best, win.

Yet Frankie can't heal the emotional wounds of his life even though he spends 365 days a year at Mass and writes letters to his estranged daughter every day asking for, I assume forgiveness. But the letters come back marked "Return to Sender" and Frankie files them away in a box and his life returns to the needs and wants of his Gym for Boxers and to his best friend, confidant and former fighter, Eddie Dupris (Morgan Freeman).

And then Maggie Fitzgerald walks into Frankie's Gym, pays her Gym dues for six months and asks Frankie every day to train her. And everyday he turns her down: "you're too old, too skinny...and you're a girl," he says.

Until one day she wears him down, he concedes to her wishes and there begins a Cinderella story of fights won, money earned and glory attained. And then it's all taken away.

Eastwood has made some great, even unforgettable films: "The Unforgiven, "Bird" to name a couple. But he has done nothing to match the guts, emotional power and poignancy of "Million Dollar Baby." And Hillary Swank, pretty much floundering after "Boys Don't Cry," is as sunny, thoughtful and real as she's ever been.

There is a scene towards the end of "MDB" between Frankie and Maggie in which Frankie explains the meaning of a Gaelic nickname that he has given Maggie that grabs at your heart and is so beautifully realized that you are galvanized with emotion. It's so real and so true to the tone of the film that you can't help but gasp.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Miles D. Moore TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 30, 2005
Despite the insistence of some critics that "Million Dollar Baby" is a notably fresh, surprising and original movie, don't believe it. It's an old-fashioned, five-hanky, melodramatic weeper, basically notable for the way that screenwriter Paul Haggis and director-star Clint Eastwood graft one familiar plot onto another to change the movie's direction, abruptly and completely, about two-thirds of the way through. (It's no fair to say precisely what they do, or how they do it; but if you know what people generally do in boxing rings, it isn't a particularly surprising plot twist.) But if you've seen both stories before, seldom have you seen either story done with such conviction, polish, and restrained yet powerful emotion. Eastwood, one of Hollywood's smoothest old pros, milks every scene for maximum impact, and gets marvelous chiaroscuro effects out of cinematographer Tom Stern as well as believably grungy, gritty sets from production designer Henry Bumstead. Eastwood's also at the top of his game as an actor here; his scenes with another great old pro, Morgan Freeman, are wonderful to watch, like Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus matching each other shot for shot on the back nine. Haggis gives Eastwood and Freeman sharp, incisive dialogue that is fully worthy of their artistry. But the standout here is Hilary Swank, who proves beyond doubt that her mesmerizing, Oscar-winning performance in "Boys Don't Cry" was no fluke. In a role that makes both extreme physical and emotional demands, Swank creates one of the most heartrending, lovably three-dimensional heroines in recent movie history.
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