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The Millionaire Next Door Paperback – October 1, 1998

1,912 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews


Forbes The implication of The Millionaire Next that nearly anybody with a steady job can amass a tidy fortune.

The Washington Post [A] REMARKABLE BOOK.

USA Today A nerve has been hit....[For] people who want to become wealthy.

Boston Globe A primer for amassing wealth through frugality.

San Francisco Business Times Offers a valuable message to today's spendthrift baby boomers.

Rush Limbaugh The kind of information that could lift the economic prospects of individuals more than any government policy...The Millionaire Next Door has a theme that I think rings very true..."Hey, I can do it. You can do it too!"

Business Week An interesting sociological work.

Lexington (NC) Dispatch A fascinating examination of the affluent in American society.

Cox News Service These, for the wise, are tips for all of us....A very readable book.

U.S. News & World Report Debunks the image of the rich as high-living spendthrifts.

About the Author

Dr. Thomas J. Stanley began studying the affluent in 1973. His coauthored best-selling book, The Millionaire Next Door, released in 1996, has sold 2,000,000 copies. Thomas followed his first book with Marketing to the Affluent, ranked among the ten outstanding business books by the editors of Best of Business Quarterly. In 1999, he published The Millionaire Mind, which explored America's financial elite and how they became so. The Millionaire Mind has sold 750,000 copies. The author lives in Atlanta, holds a doctorate of business administration from the University of Georgia in Athens and was formerly a professor of marketing at Georgia State University.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Gallery Books (October 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671015206
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671015206
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,912 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,724 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

183 of 191 people found the following review helpful By James L. Grubb on January 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
Most people have it all wrong about how you become wealthy, according to the author-researchers of The Millionaire Next Door. Their 20-year study of how people become wealthy involved focus groups and personal interviews and accompanying statistical tables on where they shop, cars they drive, and the daily work they do. I found the statistical tables of mild interest, but insights into their views and beliefs were surprising and revealing. The target group studied have net worths of one to ten-million dollars.
The majority acquired their wealth in one generation and followed these factors of wealth accumulation: *Live well below your means. *Spend your time, energy and money efficiently in ways that build wealth. *Believe that financial independence is more important than social status *Their parents didn't help. *Their adult children are economically seW-sufficient. *They know how to pick market opportunities. .They chose the right occupation.
As a group, they all have supreme confidence in their own ability. If you thought ancestry had much to do with it consider this: The highest concen-trations of millionaires by ancestry in order of rank are Russians; Scotts; Hungarians; Latvians; Australians; Egyptians. Self-employment is a major correlate of wealth.
They are frugal and their spouses even more so. Not only are they planners and budgeters, they don't shop where you might think; their two favorite stores are J. C. Penny and Sears. Most answer these questions the right way: -Does your household operate on an annual budget? -Do you know how much your family spends each year for food, clothing, shelter? -Do you have a clear, defined set of daily, weekly, monthly, annual and lifetime goals? -Do you spe'd a lot of time planning your financial future?
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772 of 833 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 4, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I used to be one of those people who spent all or at least most of my money and thought I was doing okay with the little savings I had in the bank earning 2% (wow).I always bought brand new cars, new clothes, went on vacations 6-8 times per year and partied. I had a great time! One day my company shut down and I was forced to live on 50% OF MY INCOME. My savings dwindled to nothing and I had a hard time making car and credit card payments. I came to the realization that I was "renting" my "lifestyle" all of which was encumbered with debts and false belief in "job security" A friend loaned me a copy of "The Millionaire Next Door" and I had to painfully admit that I had been a fool. I met a really nice old couple in their '70's who never made much over minimum wage in salary, but were debt free and had 100's of thousands to retire on and were living better than the flamboyant fools like me who spent through their incomes. This book turned me around. I would also recommend "9 Steps to Financial Freedom" and 'More Wealth without Risk" to add to your library, or at least borrow from a library. I am now living better, earning 20-25% in mutuals, contribute to my new companies 401 (k), have a IRA and am DEBT FREE with the exception of my mortgage which will be paid off in five years (or less).
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1,351 of 1,487 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 27, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Let us get one thing out of the way. This is NOT a bad book. In fact, it is a well-done, interesting, and much needed study that gives us all new insights about what millionaires are really like as opposed to people's misconceptions of them. If this was merely a study of what millionaires are like, I would give it five stars.
The problem begins when people see this book as a recommendation: "most millionaires are frugal, hard-working, well-educated, and diligent investors - so if I will act like that I will be a millionaire". This is simply not true - and for a very simple reason discussed below.
Indeed, most millionaires ARE like that. Indeed, it is good advice to be frugal, hard-working, and well-educated as opposed to the opposite. It is also gratifying to see that sometimes "doing the right thing", the protestant work ethic, and the "nose to the grindstone" attitude sometimes pay off not only in "being a better person", but in concrete monetary success. Apparently good guys DON'T finish last after all.
But the book suffers from a double survivorship bias. "Survivoship bias" is what happens when one only pays attention to those who survive a certain activity, peril, or risk, and makes ungounded conclusions about cause and effect from that. One famous example is Neitzsche's famous saying, "what doesn't kill me makes me stronger". It is based on the survivorship bias that those who survive terrible calamities tend to be stronger than other people. But it doesn't mean the calamity MADE them stronger - it might mean simply that only those who were strong to begin with survived the calamity.
What survivorship bias do we see here? First, it interviews ONLY millionaires.
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265 of 292 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Every now and thena very, very special book comes along with a "aha" and this is such a book. Many people are spending their way through high incomes---keeping up with the "JONE'S" high profile lifestyle's encumbered with high debt and zero savings. I worked for a millonaire one time who said"Money buys clothes, clothes don't buy anything!" He advised us to buy our "toys" clothes, cars, vacations etc. off profits of profits and never spend principal! This mans nt worth was well in excess of $350,000,000. I would also recommend three other books; "RICHEST MAN IN BABLYON" by George Clawson, "WEALTH WITHOUT RISK" and "FINANCIAL SELF-DEFENSE" by Charles Givens. Remember, it's not what you make, it's what's left over that counts. If you spend all of your money on your lifestyle, guess what? You'll always have to! Good reading, excellent book.
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