Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $0.06
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Millionaire by Thirty: Th... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Millionaire by Thirty: The Quickest Path to Early Financial Independence Paperback – March 15, 2010

2.3 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.94
$7.38 $0.01

$16.94 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Millionaire by Thirty: The Quickest Path to Early Financial Independence
  • +
  • Missed Fortune 101: A Starter Kit to Becoming a Millionaire
  • +
  • The Last Chance Millionaire: It's Not Too Late to Become Wealthy
Total price: $49.90
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Douglas R. Andrew is the owner and president of Paramount Financial Services, Inc., a comprehensive personal and business financial planning firm. His sons, Emron and Aaron Andrew, have clients nationwide whom they advise for asset optimization, equity management, and wealth empowerment. Starting with annual incomes of $30,000 at the age of 22, they have used the strategies outlined in Millionaire by Thirty to each accumulate assets totaling over $1.5 million at the ages of 26 and 27.

From AudioFile

Measured writing and occasionally stiff narration don't reduce the homespun appeal of this helpful investment guide by a financial advisor and his two 20-something sons. With a humanitarian spirit and many helpful strategies, they show how young people with ordinary jobs can focus on the long-term and invest wisely enough to become millionaires at an early age. Their three pillars of wise investing (compound interest, tax minimization, and leveraged investing) and three investment criteria (liquidity, safety, rate of return) are only a few of the lists and categories used to keep listeners focused on big-picture principles. These and memorable recommendations that are easy to understand make this an outstanding resource for any 20-something you know and love. T.W. © AudioFile 2008, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Business Plus; 1 edition (March 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446556017
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446556019
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #810,339 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I shelled $[...]+ bucks on this book and now I regret. This book basically talks about 2 things:

1. Buy a house early, and separate the equity from the house by taking a big mortgage or refinancing often. Now invest the equity in some "side fund" which earns a bigger return than mortgage interest.

The priciple works, but it largely depends on the appreciation rate of the house. In boom time earlier this century, it was very feasible. That's probably why Doug's 2 sons (co-authors of this book) made a million. This advice is not universally applicable because real estate appreciation is very much location and time sensitive.

2. One investment vehicle exceeds all the others because contribution/accumulation/districution are all tax-free. Sounds attractive? Definitely! The first 7 chapters talk so much about this myterious "side fund" which is low risk and high return. I held my curiosity and discovered in the end that it's MFTA (max-funded, tax-advantaged) life insurance contract. "If it's properly structured", the authors say, you can be tax-free in all 3 phases mentioned above. I've found the description of this cash value universal life insurance (indexed or fixed) very confusing. Looks like it's not very straighforward to implement, and, we never know how future legislation will affect this strategy. For a common investor like me, I wouldn't try this strategy without a complete understanding of it.

Also, the book is not very well structured. Lots of repetition of the same stuff (guess there are 3 authors writing it). Sometimes it over simplifies financial matters by summarizing everything into 3 rules.

One plus is, you can access on-line resources for free: [...]. However, lots of links are still unavailable.
Read more ›
7 Comments 107 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
First off let me start by making a statement about the author. When I was searching for a website for his "financial services" firm, other than the "missed fortune" website that was set up specifically for his books, what I came across was the website "Bay Area Family Wealth Institute" which I assume is the business site for Mr. Andrews' firm. I wasn't able to find anything concrete on it that really said what services he actually offers, nor was I able to find anything that indicated what his credentials in personal financial advice are (save for a cryptic statement that he has "experience in business management, economics, accounting, financial and estate planning, and advanced business and tax planning"). The site says he's the president of "Paramount Financial Services" but the only Paramount Financial Services website I found, which is out of Arizona, claims to specialize in "a wide range of commercial equipment financing & leasing programs to meet the changing needs of our valued clients. Our competitive programs help established and start-up companies to acquire new and used equipment for their operations". If this is Mr. Andrews' company, which I doubt, it seems to be in a business that is of little relevance to the individual personal investor.
VERDICT: Unable to verify Mr. Andrews' actual credentials or experience, or in fact what services he actually provides or how he makes a living other than through the sale of his books. While this in and of itself doesn't necessarily mean that the advice in his books is wrong, it should be the first red flag that one should use extreme caution when considering his strategies.

Now for the actual content.
Read more ›
5 Comments 80 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The main idea is to own multiple real estate properties all of which are financed at 100% at low interest rates while the excess value of the homes is invested in higher yielding (after tax) investments.

The assumptions about home appreciation rates, interest rates (borrowed and invested) and income tax rates are not realistic in today's environment in my opinion. I don't see how 18-29 year old individuals could apply these principles.

There are a few interesting ideas here and if you can get them to work, please let us know your methods.
2 Comments 63 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I bought this book recently. Thankfully it was at a now bankrupt bookstore and so I got it at a discount. This book is terrible.

Basically, you read through about 7 or 8 chapters of fluff and buildup. The authors trash financial wisdom - you know, crazy stuff like don't run up big debt on homes and pay off student loans quickly. They keep telling you about this mysteriously awesome investment strategy. And about 10 chapters in they finally tell you that you need to buy life insurance with the equity you pulled out of your home.

It's important to note that I believe this book was written in 2006. So, viewing it on the other side of the housing bubble shows you truly how much this book is completely "snake oil."

The only thing I got from this book was that it may be more important in some instances to have liquid cash than to pay certain debts off quickly. Other than that, this was totally worthless.

I wish I could give this book zero stars. It was a complete waste of a Sunday afternoon. You're much better off with a a book by Dave Ramsey, David Bach, or Gail Vaz-Oxlade.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Millionaire by Thirty: The Quickest Path to Early Financial Independence
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Millionaire by Thirty: The Quickest Path to Early Financial Independence