Millionaire Women Next Door: The Many Journeys of Success... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.95
  • Save: $8.09 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!! (there is a chance this book could contain a gift inscription)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Millionaire Women Next Door: The Many Journeys of Successful American Businesswomen Hardcover


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.86
$1.99 $0.01 $6.25

Frequently Bought Together

Millionaire Women Next Door: The Many Journeys of Successful American Businesswomen + The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy + Stop Acting Rich: ...And Start Living Like A Real Millionaire
Price for all three: $58.44

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing (May 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0740745328
  • ISBN-13: 978-0740745324
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #396,052 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Thomas J. Stanley began studying the affluent in 1973. His coauthored New York Times best-seller, The Millionaire Next Door, was released in 1996, and has sold over 2,500,000 copies worldwide. Thomas followed his first book with Marketing to the Affluent, ranked among the ten outstanding business books by the editors of Best of Business Quarterly. His second New York Times best-seller, The Millionaire Mind, explored America¿ s financial elite and how they became so when it came out in 1999. The author, who lives in Atlanta, holds a doctorate of business administration from the University of Georgia in Athens and was formerly a professor of marketing at Georgia State University.

More About the Author

Dr. Thomas J. Stanley is the author of six award winning books concentrating on America's wealthy population. His seventh book, Stop Acting Rich, was published in September 2009 by John Wiley and Sons. He began studying the affluent in 1973. Dr. Stanley wrote The Millionaire Next Door, in 1996. Over 2,000,000 copies of this New York Times bestseller have been sold. In 2000, he published The Millionaire Mind, which explored America's financial elite and how they became so. The Millionaire Mind debuted at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. Dr. Stanley's first book, Marketing to the Affluent, was selected as a top ten outstanding business book in America by the editors of Best of Business Quarterly. The author lives in Atlanta, holds a doctorate of business administration from the University of Georgia in Athens and was formerly a professor of marketing at Georgia State University. Visit Dr. Stanley at www.thomasjstanley.com for more information.

Customer Reviews

When I read The Millionaire Next Door, I was intrigued.
Tiffany
While I know Mothers day is over, guys, I highly recommend this book for your wives or significant other in your life.
Chuck Kimbriel
The writing is often dry and academic, but that's to be expected as it is a book reporting on research.
T. L. Cooper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Diane on June 30, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you're a woman who didn't quite see yourself in The Millionaire Next Door, there's hope. Women are different than male millionaires in several important ways. For example, the typical male millionaire has married once and remains married, but over half of female millionaires have been divorced. Women are also more generous than men.
The book mainly talks about business owners becoming wealthy, but it also talks about alternatives to business ownership. Stanley profiles a star saleswoman, educators (a wealthier group than you realize), and stay-at-home women who act as managers of their "family office". He also discusses parenting your children so they can develop a millionaire mindset. Many situations are presented in this book, so you can probably find something that will apply to you.

As for helpful advice, the author points out cautions women need to consider. Women need to watch out for the "Marginal Bob" worthless first husbands. Women also often provide continued financial support to their grown children and grandchildren. This "economic outpatient care" hurts both parents and children.
I enjoyed reading this book. It was well written and thoroughly researched. I will buy more copies for graduation gifts.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
74 of 81 people found the following review helpful By Sheryl Katz VINE VOICE on May 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
There are some interesting bits and pieces in this book, most of which are generally familiar to readers of Stanley's other books. However, on the whole the book doesn't amount to much, wavering between sociological analysis and how to while not actually being either.

What is clearly stated, but somewhat hidden is that this is not a book about women "millionaires" in general. It is based on responses to a questionaire by a group of women business owners with incomes over $100,000 and a net worth between $1 million and $25 million. Not included at all are women professionals, women who have amassed over $1 million by working in corporations, or women who might have made their money as partners in majority male owned businesses. It is not surprising that the women millionaires in this study have not departed much in their consumption or living habits from their middle class roots. It's impossible to say whether his conclusions are even mildly relevant to women who might have made just as much or more money in other ways, and who may account for a larger number of women millionaires.

There were a few observations in the book that I did find to be interesting enough that I didn't feel like I wasted my time. One observation was about how many of the millionaire women had married a type he called "Marginal Bob". (I call them losers). I have observed this phenomenon scores of times in high achieving women, and it's the first time I've seen it documented. Another was the chapter about women who came from dysfunctional families but who were still quite successful.

To me the book felt like fairly pedestrian (and not very well written) how-to advice cloaked in the pretense of scientific investigation.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Mccarthy on February 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I absolutely loved this book! When I originally read Stanley's Millionare Next Door, I was put off that all the data was regarding men (but that it is still a very good book). I was suprised to stumble on this book and am very glad that I did!

Recently, before reading the book, I made the assumption that for women, money correlates with charity. Look at Susan Sarandan w/ the Heffer program and Oprah w/ her various charity beliefs...Awesome women who know how to give back to the world.

I feel it in my bones that this book is one of the variables in my life to lead me to success. It has opened my eyes and confirmed my assumptions to obtain success. And has also provided me w/ many other aspects and details I found interesting.

This is a definite book to have in your collection if you are serious about obtaining success. Not just monetary success but happiness w/in yourself and the community/world you live in.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gregory McMahan VINE VOICE on May 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I just finished reading this book after picking it up at a bookstore about five days ago. I read from it every chance I got, and though on the one hand, I have to agree with those readers who pointed out that the book was tough going at times, on the other hand, I also have to agree with other readers who had very good things to say about the book, as the favorable reviews are well deserved. First I will cite the bad about the book, and then I will cite the good.

First the bad. The book appears to rely heavily upon convenience sampling and voluntary response. The author seems to have shared mostly only those stories sent to him, or more plainly, that just fell into his lap. Second, like his two other millionaire books, the author uses the book as a platform to share with us the things he values, and appears only to look for that information or evidence which supports his values, never once addressing information that contradicts his position. Third, in keeping with the standard paradigm of women = victim and male = (opportunistic) victimizer, (which always plays well to the target demographic of the book), the author's attempt to make out this group of women as selfless, do-gooding heroines was a bit overdone. The millionaire women are seen as generous and charitable as a group, and the millionaire men are portrayed as heartless misers who penny-pinch at every turn. I felt especially incensed when Stanley went out of his way to make excuses for some millionaire womens' poor choices in mates- the so-called 'Marginal Bobs' (the book titled, Smart Women, Stupid Choices, comes readily to mind for some peculiar reason).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa17a09cc)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?