Millions 2005 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(174) IMDb 7/10
Available in HD
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Two pre-teen siblings find a million pounds in stolen cash and must use it before the adoption of the Euro makes the cash redundant.

Starring:
Alex Etel, Lewis McGibbon
Runtime:
1 hour 39 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Millions

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Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Drama, Comedy, Kids & Family
Director Danny Boyle
Starring Alex Etel, Lewis McGibbon
Supporting actors James Nesbitt, Daisy Donovan, Christopher Fulford, Pearce Quigley, Jane Hogarth, Alun Armstrong, Enzo Cilenti, Nasser Memarzia, Kathryn Pogson, Harry Kirkham, Cornelius Macarthy, Kolade Agboke, Leslie Phillips, James Quinn, Mark Chatterton, Toby Walton, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Christy Cullen
Studio 20th Century Fox
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Great story, and the acting by the boys is very good!
Philip St Romain
The story shows his passion for saints and martyrs, and how his faith in God helps him cope with the many changes taking place in his life.
Dr. Irene Blinston, Ph.D.
This is such a great movie.....kids and adults will love it.
G. Torre

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 73 people found the following review helpful By K. Cooley on March 19, 2005
This was a great film that really shows what money can do to people. It is also fascinating that it is the youngest person who actually has philanthropic ideas on how to spend it.

Spurred on by the urgency that England is switching over to the Euro in a few days (not gonna happen,) freckle-faced Damien and his brother, Anthony, have to think fast. Damien feels the money came from God and therefore should be used to help the less fortunate. Anthony feels like they *are* the less fortunate and should use it to help themselves. Damien is also helped by odd visions of saints who counsel him. Meanwhile, Anthony is out pricing real estate.

Of course, tossing money on unsuspecting children is not really God's style, as the boys' father states. The money was actually tossed by a bank robber who wants it back at any cost.

This is a fun yet profound film that accurately shows greed, kindness, faith, and selfishness all resulting from the same event. The viewer is left with a satisfied feeling and even a few introspective questions like, "What would I do if the same thing happened to me?"

Highly recommended--
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 7, 2005
Format: DVD
Danny Boyle ('28 Days Later', 'Trainspotting', 'A Life Less Ordinary') has a way with stories that transports a good script (in this case one by Frank Cottrell Boyce) into a cinematic range that creates magic. MILLIONS may seem like a little family tale on the surface, but in Boyle's hands this story about the struggle between Janus ethics vaults off into magical realism, happily taking the audience along for a journey of wonder and joy and the importance of charity.

Damian (Alexander Nathan Etel) and his older brother Anthony (Lewis Owen McGibbon) are moved by their father Ronnie (James Nesbitt) to a new housing project after the untimely death of the boys' mother. The brothers are devoted to each other yet Anthony is the pragmatist while Damian is the dreamer, a lad who regularly has visions and poignant converations with dead saints, always asking if they know anything about St. Maureen (his recently deceased mother). Damian believes in miracles and when suddenly a Nike bag containing a quarter of a million British pounds falls on his playhouse he believes it is from God and that it is his responsibility to distribute the money to the poor. When he shares the secret with Anthony, the latter's psyche begins to organize ways to spend and invest the money - because the British sterling will soon convert to the Euro making the bag's stash useless.

The journey of how the two brothers cope with their instant fortune and how they cope with their family minus one forms the line of the film. There are good guys, bad guys, various saints, hilarious encounters with mundane ethically bifurcated folks like a Mormon team - all of whom make the visual and emotional aspects of this film thoroughly entertaining. The actors, especially young Atel, are superb and Boyle's use of the magical ignites the story into an unforgettable fable and tale of humanity. Highly recommended for everyone to see. Grady Harp, November 05.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rich Stoehr on August 11, 2005
Format: DVD
This is one of those movies that you sometimes run across purely by accident, and once you've seen it you're so glad you did. At least, that's what happened to me.

The story is a smart "what-if" sort of premise, starting with the idea that Great Britain is in a rush to convert their legal tender from Pounds Sterling to the Euro. As the movie begins, the final date for this changeover is a little over a week away, after which the Pound will no longer be usable anywhere in Britain. That's the story behind the story -- the real story begins when Damian, a young boy whose mother died recently, and who is prone to visions of saints, discovers a bag full of money (British pounds, of course) that has literally seemed to fall right out of the sky. Damian tells his brother Anthony about the find, and they both agree that the only answer is that they should keep it a secret from their father, and spend it themselves.

So, how can two boys spend hundreds of thousands of pounds in just over a week? This is itself causes problems, as they both have different ideas of how to spend it. Kind-hearted Damian wants to find people who need it and give it away to them, while Anthony, a little older and more cynical, is more concerned with using it to buy status and influence among their friends.

The story that unfolds from this premise is clever and sharp -- never overly serious but always staying honest, keeping the eye on the ball and conveying a message about money and what it can do to people. The real story of "Millions" is the story of family, of the brotherhood between Damian and Anthony, of their relationship with their father, and of the missing place where their mother once stood.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bitcetc on March 31, 2005
Hagiography:: the study of the lives of the saints.

I've always wanted to use that word "hagiography", and this may be my only opportunity in a movie review. If I knew more about the study of the lives of saints or Catholic conventions, perhaps I would know whether "Damian" has a religious connotation beyond some familiar religiously-themed movie characters, and whether "Damian", a saintly little boy who is the hero of this piece, is symbolic. But while I muse and research, please go see this movie.

Remember when you see this movie that it is a parable, a fable, a teaching tale. If one takes it as the literal story of two young motherless English brothers who are deciding what to do with a bag of money which fell from the sky into Damian's playhouse, one might become impatient with the actions of one or the other brother or of some thin spots in the plot. But after the initial ten minutes of camera tricks and time-lapse photography, and general show-casing of the director's (Danny Boyle's) camera skills already recognized from "Trainspotting", the story itself begins to shine through. The charm of a youngster enamoured of the lives of the saints, and who may be able to communicate with the saints, begins to assert itself.

While Damian believes the money is from God and must be distributed to the poor, his too-street-smart older brother believes they should invest in real estate. This dilemma has a time limit, however, as the British pounds in the bag must be converted into Euros, or become worthless, within days. Also spurred by the clock's ticking down on the value of this cache is the very ungodly thief who stole the money in the first place and who wants it back.
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