Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.99
  • Save: $3.85 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze Hardcover – September 14, 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$12.14
$2.56 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze + Free Thaddeus! + The Girl Who Threw Butterflies
Price for all three: $24.69

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

More to Explore
Check out this exclusive cartoon based on Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze [PDF].

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 13 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 8
  • Lexile Measure: 1180L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Aladdin (September 14, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416994300
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416994305
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #735,178 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5-8–By page 14, readers will know that this is more than just another funny story about a middle school misfit who is the new kid in the neighborhood. While Milo does struggle with all the normal tween anxieties and self-consciousness about his family, there is more. Silberberg details the daily events with Wimpy Kid-like drawings and quick-witted humor that will keep the pages turning. Milo's new friendships with classmates Marshall and Hillary and elderly neighbor Sylvia Poole allow readers to glimpse at the deeper truth–Milo's mother's death–as it emerges between laugh lines. Silberberg takes on a tough topic and always stays true to the age of the character through dialogue and artwork while maintaining that wisecracking, 12-year-old humor. Added to this, he manages to convey Milo's pain and fears without ever becoming maudlin or depressing. Those familiar with Silberberg's Pond Scum (Hyperion, 2005) will recognize the similar style of writing. Yet with Milo, the author embraces a core childhood fear, molding the humor with poignancy to create a profound slice of one boy's life.Tina Hudak, St. Albans School, Washington, DC
© Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review

"Alan Silberberg has written an astounding illustrated novel that deals with the loss of a parent. Milo’s feelings are real and raw, and he’s busy coping with trying to be in 7th grade, while sorting out needing a parent who is no longer there. Alternately hilarious and heartbreaking, readers will effortlessly be drawn to Milo and his friends and family. This is not simply a book about losing a parent…it is a pitch perfect story of being in middle school, the push/pull of need and independence, and the story of a boy."
--Welcome to my Tweendom blog

More About the Author

As a kid I always knew I was going to be a writer. It was that or being the guy who hands out samples at the supermarket (I liked the easy access to the snack foods).

Every day I get to sit down and make stuff up. Let me tell you, that's a pretty great way to spend your time. Especially if you have a dog named Zeus perched on the chair behind you and an iced coffee by your side. Give me those things and then I'm all set to do my best putting words together to tell a story I hope you'll like.

MILO: STICKY NOTES & BRAIN FREEZE is my latest book and I am so proud that it exists. Winner of the SCBWI Sid Fleischman Humor Award, MILO is a funny story about a 13 year-old boy trying to figure out how to fit in and make sense of all the changes swirling around him. Filled with my cartoons and illustrations, it is also a heartwarming book that tells the story of a boy learning how to say the goodbye he never had the chance to say.

Milo is a weird and funny kid learning how to live without his mom. The book is so important to me because I was Milo. I lost my mom when I was nine and that was the moment my own life went from being normal - to being something that didn't make sense any more.

I wrote the book because it was a story that needed to come out of me. That's why it is a funny book. A sad book. A hopeful book and a helpful book.

MILO: STICKY NOTES & BRAIN FREEZE is the book I hope you enjoy as well!

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
This was one of the sad books I have read.
Miyuki
Not a cartoon, Milo is a real kid, a quirky, funny kid you like, a kid that you want to see succeed.
B. Karney
The cartooning adds humor and depth to the story.
Darcy Pattison

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on September 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"It's Diary of a Wimpy Kid if the mom died." BAM! Now that's grabby, ain't it? If I were a Hollywood executive I suppose that might be how I'd sell Alan Silberberg's newest novel about a boy and his issues. It's not how I'd sell it to an actual kid, though. Alan Silberberg has managed something that I would have deemed near impossible. He's penned a funny novel that deals with the very real issue of how a family copes when one of its family members passes on and he's do ...more "It's Diary of a Wimpy Kid if the mom died." BAM! Now that's grabby, ain't it? If I were a Hollywood executive I suppose that might be how I'd sell Alan Silberberg's newest novel about a boy and his issues. It's not how I'd sell it to an actual kid, though. Alan Silberberg has managed something that I would have deemed near impossible. He's penned a funny novel that deals with the very real issue of how a family copes when one of its family members passes on and he's done it with a combo of art and prose. Milo: Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze combines interstitial comics with a fun text and a gripping story to come up with a book that manages to be all things for all readers. Humor fans will like it, but so too will those kids who need a little extra meat in their fiction. This is a book that isn't afraid to get a little sad and serious once in a while. A dead mom book that kids will really gravitate towards.

Once again, Milo has become the new kid at school. Ever since his mom died his dad has been moving both him and his older sister into different homes. Everything from the "Apartment of Endless Stairs" to the appropriately dubbed "Stink Hole (The mystery smell was never found!)".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Widow Mom on October 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I lost my husband to cancer 2-years ago. I have read countless grief books regarding children and grieving. They are all so clinical, and often only mirror what I am living, not a lot of insight into the world of my children.

I have been reading Milo:Sticky Notes- Brain Freeze with my two sons 7 & 9. It is a great story to read with your children. When I first bought the book, I thought; 'Oh this will be good to help my son open up and talk'. As it turns out, it's been a great book for all of us. It has given me a glimpse into their side of grieving. I have always been able to look at my son's and tell they hurt, but it's impossible to get into their heads and know how they are feeling. My son's can't always put their feelings into words, and Milo does a great job of telling what it's like losing a parent.

This book has brought me to tears and made us all laugh. When I start to cry, my 9-year old will take the book out of my hands and continue reading. After the passage is read, we talk. I tell him why it made me cry and ask if he has felt the same way...a huge eye opener.

By all means, this book should not be limited to children who have lost, but it's a great story about a boy learning to deal with his problems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Donovan TOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book has a sad premise (that kept my 12 year old daughter from wanting to read it, until after I told her that I think she'd like it). A couple of years ago, Milo's mom died. Since then, it's just been his older sister and his dad and him trying to navigate life through "the fog." They've moved several times and each time more and more things that remind Milo of his mom disappear. He and his dad never talk about anything real, and since he's moved around so much, he doesn't have close friends with whom he can share his thoughts.

Everything changes at this move, landing him at a new school for his 7th grade year. He meets a neighbor who lost her husband, he has two great friends, and a crush on the popular girl at school. This book reads like a typical middle-school misfit story, complete with the little line drawings that are so popular these days. Milo's sort of an odd duck, but one of the morals of the story is that all a person needs is one good friend. I loved that he got to be who he was, and with the help of his new friends, he got to wade through the fog and embrace the memories of his mom. It wasn't sad per se, but it definitely will help those who read it get an understanding of what it's like to lose a loved one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. Karney on September 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was a fan of this author after reading and loving his previous book - Pond Scum - so I had high hopes for his latest book. I had heard that it was illustrated throughout with cartoons, so I figured that it was going to be like the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books, which was fine by me.

In fact, I was quite unprepared for how wonderful, emotional, and yes, timeless, Milo turns out to be. The book starts out as if it will indeed be a Wimpy Kid-type school comedy: Milo is a slightly awkward, self-conscious kid entering middle school and drawing cartoons about his experiences. Sounds pretty familiar, but soon small details begin to suggest we are in deeper waters here. Milo's father is emotionally absent. His older sister is never home. His math teacher's shaved head bothers him for reasons he cannot fully explain. And then, gently, Milo lets us know that he lost his mother to a brain tumor two years before the book began.

And the book, although laugh-out-loud funny throughout, reveals itself to be a powerfully moving, emotional story of how Milo learns to deal with his mother's death by embracing her memory rather than rejecting it.

Sounds like a downer? It's not, at all, although I cried (not just choked up but sobs and everything) at least three times. In fact this is an uplifting book, and again -- it's funny a lot. And I have not even lost a parent - I can only imagine that a young person facing a loss similar to Milo's might find real comfort here.

But this is not a "message" book. It is not about the lessons that Milo learns. It's a story, and what makes it work is how perfectly Silberberg captures Milo's voice. Not a cartoon, Milo is a real kid, a quirky, funny kid you like, a kid that you want to see succeed.

This is a terrific book. Strongest possible recommendation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?