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Mind the Gap


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Product Details

  • Actors: Mina Badie, Stan Berger, Pamela Dunlap, Michael Gatson, John Heard
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Showtime Ent.
  • DVD Release Date: July 12, 2005
  • Run Time: 134 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0009ETCR4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #88,327 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Mind the Gap" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Five seemingly unreleated adults decide to take huge risks with their lives, searching for the happiness constantly eluding them. The characters include Sam Blue, a single father and his son Rocky; Jody Butler, a street performer; retiree Herb Schweitzer

Customer Reviews

Sharp, raw, and real!
Philosopath
People will embrace this film, it'll make them feel good--but rarely have I witnessed a movie so false and so manipulative at every turn.
K. Harris
Great acting, and music too.
Michael A. Maday

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Alejandra Vernon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 25, 2005
Format: DVD
Filmed on a stringent budget and time schedule, "Mind the Gap" is a brilliant ensemble piece that follows 5 life stories in a heart-warming, life-affirming web of coincidence. Director Eric Shaeffer, who also plays the part of Sam, has woven this magical tale into a film I will never forget. It is a love song to life, and it is also about courage. The courage to do the things that result in a life lived without regrets.

The cast is superb. Alan King plays a cantankerous old man on a mission, and this was sadly to be his last film. Elizabeth Reaser plays Melissa, a young woman born of a rape, who has a heart full of strength and love. Reaser is luminous, a beauty that will no doubt be a superstar in the near future. Christopher Kovaleski is Rocky, Sam's gangling, bright and shining son, who is a delight to watch. Singer Jill Sobule is Jody, a petite dynamo with an extraordinary talent as a songwriter and as an actress, and the film features many of her songs. Charles Parnell is incredibly moving as John, a man despondent over his divorce. There are many other great performances too numerous to name individually, all of them memorable characters, played to perfection, and the thread around them is Julio Diaz, the Times Square salsa dancing man.

Watch this film several times, and you will see its many layered quality, revealing more with each viewing. It is a quirky, beautiful, warm, and lovable film, and deserves one's time and attention. Filmed on location in New York City and Vermont by Marc Blandori, the music is by Veigar Margeisson, with some mystical, lovely selections by Krishna Das. The DVD extra is the commentary for the film, which is chatty and informative, and total running time is 130 minutes.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Sammy on July 19, 2005
Format: DVD
This is a terrific film by Eric Schaeffer, who also stars in this ensemble piece in the tradition/spirit of the better Robert Altman films. Every scene makes sense. The performances are all excellent, including a wonderful job by the late great Alan King, one of the best American talents of the past half century. This is a movie well worth seeing. See it yourself and be surprised as I was.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Binder on November 12, 2006
Format: DVD
Stay with this movie. It moves slowly, as you move into the lives of the participants. In an era of one hundred million dollar movies, special effects, sex, and endless violence, it is a touchstone of humanity. It will make you smile.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Larry VanDeSande VINE VOICE on October 20, 2006
Format: DVD
Here's the second-most common genre of film being produced -- the New York movie, second only to the L.A. movie. In this one, five disparate people end up in New York for somewhat related reasons. Only one of these actors, Alan King, has any star power and is a name you may recall from your past if you are of a certain age or if you watch "GoodFellas" every time it's on.

Eric Schaeffer's portrait of troubled people coming from different compass points to New York is a largely sympathetic portrayal of people from all kinds of backgrounds and ethnicity. In other words, it was made to show there was something for everyone in the movie.

One of these people is a 70-year-old meandering around the city in dangerous places on his way to a destination; another is a quirky woman that spent her life caring for her bitter and dying mother; still another is, again, a quirky woman, a street singer with a bad heart looking to make good; a fourth is a black man seeking absolution for wrecking his marriage; the fifth is a man and his son seeking resolution of the father's past life. They all end up in New York in the end on their way to someone or something.

This movie tries to care for all these people and tries to show the goodness that exists in everyone, even among the midst of depression, death and defeat. The optimism of the ending follows a lot of heartbreak and grief throughout, creating an old school, old world film that harkens back to a time when emotion was what moviemaking was all about.

You'll probably like a lot of what's going on in this movie and, if you are a New Yorker, you may be able to identify with some of the action or locales.
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Format: DVD
Here we go again (send me your hate mail). "Mind The Gap" is another (of many) films that people discover and love. With a large colorful cast, many life lessons to be learned, and a rollicking feel good ending--oh, this must be a crowd pleaser! People will embrace this film, it'll make them feel good--but rarely have I witnessed a movie so false and so manipulative at every turn. I recently said in another review that "quirky" is the new curse of the indie film scene. There are nice quirky pictures--but most films of this genre tend to give you character types instead of real people. We're supposed to find oddball mannerisms irresistible and relatable. Now a straight comedy can sometimes pull this off, but it is far more difficult for a film trying to have a serious side. It's a house of cards--because you have "types" and not "people," real emotional payoff is hard to come by. In "Mind the Gap," this house is also built on overstylized and unbelievable dialogue.

The impossibly quirky characters in this ensemble include an old Jewish man in New York who berates everyone he meets, a terribly despondent father in the Southwest, and a street performer in Astoria with a bad heart and 10 jars of peanut butter in her refrigerator (isn't that wacky?) There are two other main characters, each more precious than the others. There's a man in Vermont with his son. They shave their heads on a whim to look like Michael Jordan, isn't that cute? And they patter on in a most unrealistic way--imagine a grade school child who draws crayon pictures in class. Now imagine the same kid involved in pithy banter and uttering lines like this--"Do you really think that subliminal mind control is the way to bring up a healthy, free-thinking child?" Priceless.
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Music creditsin Mind the Gap
Jill Sobule did most of the songs - she's the one who plays the singer. She has 4 albums - on amazon.com, or on itunes. I "gogled" her as sson as I saw the movie.
Sep 18, 2006 by KAT |  See all 2 posts
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