Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Beach House Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services gotS5 gotS5 gotS5  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Gear Up for Football Learn more

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on November 4, 2012
I read comics. A lot of comics. Even some of the best of them I would never recommend to anyone who does not like the graphic novel already.

This is not Superheroes. This is not Bloody and Empty. This is a contemporary New York crime mystery with a special spice blend of lucid comas and dark hidden family secrets. This isn't a story about magic... but there is some rotten science a foot I can tell you that. Ever wanted to hang out with coma patients inside their head? Do it in this comic. Ever want to see what happens to their loved ones? Do it in this comic! Ever want to follow the detectives and doctors that try and solve the case? Follow them OR BEAT THEM TO IT. If you do not like science fiction elements do not let them keep you from this comic... let your love of a good mystery and layered contemporary characters win out.

This comic is for people who LOVE mysteries. Do you watch any tv show and try and figure out the killer before the show does? Are you ultimately depressed when you are always right? THIS COMIC IS FOR YOU. Beautifully drawn with clarity and written with layers of meaning, the team behind Mind the Gap give you all the clues you need to try and figure out this one before any of the cast do. So either go along for the ride in a wonderfully written tale of betrayal and loyalty or pick over the tiny clocks giving you actual times to help you make your own timeline and eliminate suspects. This is a who-done-it that leaves me dying to read what is coming next because the twists are that unexpected and oh so fun.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 23, 2012
Mind The Gap by Jim McCann and Rodin Esquejo is the story of a young wealthy New Yorker (Elle) who has been put in a coma after being attacked. She is transported into a sort of coma world with other coma victims. The mystery deepens the more we find out more about Elle's friends and family. McCann gives you just enough to stay intrigued and guessing on who is behind the attack but can't quite prove it. All the characters are well thought out, real and unique in their own way. Esquejo's are is nothing short of spectacular. His detail and realness is second to none. Sonia Oback's colors add the tone for each scene.

If you're a mystery fan who is willing to dive into the spiritual this is the book for you. But be warned after reading this you'll just watch and wait for the calendar go by until the next volume comes out.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
I'd heard excellent things about Mind the Gap and saw that the reviews were quite favorable, so imagine my surprise when I found myself disappointed by this first volume.

I can sum up my dissatisfaction with one simple reason: I did not care about a single character.

Ellis, the main character, is attacked in the subway and taken to the hospital. There she has physically entered a coma but her psyche has traveled to the astral plane where she interacts with other coma sufferers. Elle must work out her own attack as she struggles to remember even the most basic of facts about herself.

The list of potential attackers is quite large: her mother, her father, her brother, her boyfriend, a few doctors, as well as what is implied to be a clandestine organization of some sort. But here's the thing - Elle is not especially likable. Frankly, nothing about her character makes me sympathize with her nor do I really care who attacked her. This is, of course, a problem when the entire series appears to be hanging on that core plot point.

The dialogue jarred me a bit as well. The problem with trying to write trendy, cool dialogue is that it becomes dated rather quickly and if a reader happens to be neither trendy nor cool (such as me), the dialogue reads incredibly hokey.

Finally, the art is beautiful, but I did not find it particularly dynamic. Each panel, for the most part, depicts a person or people talking. There isn't much that I would consider visually striking or fluid. Yes, the artist is very good at drawing people and backgrounds, but I didn't feel it moved the story along well. Granted, it would be difficult to draw page after page of people talking and doing not much else.

A protagonist who is not all that charismatic, a mystery that isn't especially important to me, cheesy dialogue, and largely uninteresting artwork - Mind the Gap did not impress.

~Scott William Foley, author of Andropia
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2015
Intimate Strangers collects the first 5 issues of Mind the Gap. A girl named Ellis Peterssen makes a freaky phone call causing her family and a bunch of other people to go ballistic. She ends up in a hospital after being found unconscious in a subway station, the victim of head trauma. Strange things are going on in Ellis' head, starting with her inability to remember that she's Ellis. This is represented by some pretty cool art that starts out blurry and slowly comes into focus.

While Ellis is having an out-of-body experience in a netherworld where coma victims go to gossip, a doctor named Gina Gellar is having Cagney and Lacey experiences with the female cop to whom she is married. When Gellar isn't kissing the cop, she's trying to figure out what Ellis' attending physician is hiding about Ellis' condition.

Things get even stranger for Ellis when she starts having an in-body experience ... in the wrong body. And then she's visited in limbo-land by a therapist who makes out-of-body house calls. So how is coma boy related to coma girl? That's one of many unanswered questions in volume 1.

Back in the real world, people are still trying to kill Ellis, possibly even her family members. There's some wealth in this family but, like many wealthy families, you wouldn't want to be part of it. Clearly, sorting out the good guys from the bad is going to take awhile.

In fact, the entire story may take some time to tell. It isn't plodding, but it moves more like a print novel than a graphic novel, taking time to establish characters and backgrounds while the plot advances at a deliberate pace. That isn't necessarily bad, but it does make it difficult to review a single volume. It may be necessary to read the entire thing before forming a judgment. That may be difficult since the series is now on hiatus (which is often a euphemism for dead, but I guess we'll see).

Will the story eventually develop a strong plot? There are hints of that in volume 1, but no clear answers. As it stands, I like the character development and the story is sufficiently intriguing to encourage my interest in volumes 2 and 3.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2013
I initially purchased the first issue of this book for the art, simply put its fantastic. That said lots of comics have great art, not all of them have an enthralling story to draw you in. Mind the Gap does, its been on my monthly pull list ever since. When the trade came out I picked it up as well and I couldn't be happier. This is a great psychological/paranormal mystery, I highly recommend everyone pick up a copy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 8, 2015
After reading this graphic novel, I was really surprised to see it was published a few years ago. NetGalley usually offers new books, mostly advance reader copies. While I definitely enjoyed it, I can't help being worried since the latest issue came out a year and a half ago and the story doesn't end there. Will it be continued? I want to find out what happens next, but I am not willing to risk reading the following volumes and end up with a cliffhanger that will never be solved if the comic book series doesn't continue.

Mind the Gap tells the story of a young, wealthy, beautiful woman - Elle - who is in a coma after someone whose identity we don't know tried to kill her. She "lives" in a place as a sort of ghost, being able to see what is happening in the hospital and can also visit other places. Elle can also see other comatose patients and has long conversations with them. She suffers from memory loss and it is not clear if the ghosts she is speaking to are real or they are just manifestations of her consciousness.

The story is very confusing, but the artwork is absolutely beautiful and it is very clear this first volume is meant to just introduce you to the story.

As I have mentioned before, I am very curious about what happened, but the story is progressing slowly and the first 16 issues came out in the years of 2012 and 2013, with only issue 17 released in 2014 - which introduces the second act of the story.

I am more than willing to dive into the story more but I just fear it won't be continued anymore by the author. Hopefully, NetGalley promoting this after 3 years from its original publication date is a sign the publishers want to test if readers are interested and also re-promote the series. *Fingers crossed*
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon January 17, 2015
Elle is a beautiful young woman from a wealthy family who is suddenly struck down on the subway and is now in a coma – whodunit and why?

For some reason the mystery genre and comics don’t seem to gel. Take Nick Spencer’s Morning Glories for example. Spencer believes piling on one puzzling scene after another is enough for a mystery story. So in the first Morning Glories book you get deathtraps, patrolling murderous death squads, ghosts, cults, doppelgangers and more supernatural ephemera, the idea being you’re interested in finding out what it all means to keep reading. We’ll call it “the Lost phenomenon”, but really it’s just bad mystery. There’s no plot and the reader has no clue what’s going on so there’s nothing to make the reader invested in anything that’s happening. In fact the only real mystery behind the series is why it’s popular at all!

Contrast this with a great (non-comics) mystery story: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie. What makes it great? Simplicity. It isn’t one non-sequitur after another ad nauseam, it’s a handful of people trapped in an isolated location being killed off one by one – and one of the group is the murderer. You understand the situation and the story, you know the parameters of the mystery and it’s fun seeing the puzzle work itself out.

And so we come to Mind the Gap, Volume 1 which isn’t as bad as Morning Glories – Jim McCann is more restrained than Spencer and a story does begin to emerge by the end - but is definitely a good example of a bad mystery. Why? The mystery itself is boring, static and, besides not really knowing what’s happening, I also didn’t care to find out.

Elle is knocked unconscious and put into a coma. Is there a threat to anyone else in the cast for the same thing to happen to another character? There doesn’t seem to be. There goes the tension! More importantly, what is the story – find out how Elle was put in a coma, right? So who are we following – who’s actively trying to figure this out? No one!

What are the characters doing and why should we care? There’s Dr Geller who’s got a rivalry with Dr Hammond. Ok. Dead end there! What about Dane, Elle’s artist boyfriend? He’s not doing anything besides fighting with Elle’s bestie who’s sleeping a lot. She wakes up one time when Elle is able to talk to her from the spirit world but that’s it.

Is Elle our main character? She’s in Purgatory talking to ghosts trying to figure out a way back to her body. For some reason she can inhabit other peoples’ bodies but not her own – not quite sure why. Because if she could then that’d be the end of the series?

So here’s the situation: Elle’s spirit is bumbling around in Purgatory while the rest of the cast stand around pointing fingers. The paper-thin plot barely advances and, besides some shadowy guy in a hoodie calling people on a cell phone, nothing much happens. This is such a frustratingly boring comic! Then the story emerges towards the end and it’s a cliché. Brilliant.

The saving grace is Rodin Esquejo’s artwork which is far too good for Jim McCann’s crap script. This pairing is the comic book equivalent of Simon and Garfunkel. Esquejo’s artwork isn’t just gorgeous – the Breakfast Club tribute cover and the image of Elle as Bee Girl from that Blind Melon album are just two memorable pages – but is also incredibly evocative. I could actually feel the characters’ emotions through the imagery, it’s so convincing and real, and you see the script through the art. That’s how good the artwork is and it’s so rare to come across in comics!

The magnificent Adrian Alphona (current artist on Ms Marvel) draws most of the final chapter which explores Dane’s troubled past with his deadbeat dad and his relationship with Elle. Fantastic artwork again but also outstanding layouts. Alphona packs in so much story into his pages that sit so perfectly alongside each other, especially the pages without panels. Mind the Gap would’ve been a total loss if not for Alphona and Esquejo’s art keeping me engaged.

I get the title – “Mind the Gap” – could be a reference to the warning you see in subways, tying in to where Elle was found, as well as an instruction to the reader to “mind the gaps” in the storytelling because it’s a mystery. But there’s really nothing here story-wise that I liked enough to want to pursue or recommend to others to pick up. I think I’ll steer clear of anything else by Jim McCann. The only positive I got out of this was another artist’s name to look out for: Rodin Esquejo.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
TOP 100 REVIEWERon January 14, 2015
The stunning cover image really drew me in, promising what I hoped would be an intriguing story. Unfortunately, a very slow and tangential pace combined with flat/unrealistic/uninteresting characters ensured I never really engaged with Mind The Gap. Half way through, I stopped reading and started skimming; the plot remained too vague and so twists lacked impact or impetus, failing to push a nearly non-existent central mystery forward.

Story: Elle is in a coma; yet she still thinks and reasons within her trapped brain. She's not sure what is real or what isn't - only that she needs to figure out what happened to her: how she ended up abandoned with a serious head injury at a metro station. Along with a cast of characters in her brain, a mysterious killer on the prowl, and the ability to enter certain comatose bodies, she'll have to figure out a way to get back to consciousness in her own body. Meanwhile, a doctor and her friends are suspicious about the circumstances of her injury and the hospital caring for her - and they will start to uncover anomalies and mysteries that could endanger their lives as well.

This really should have worked - a nuanced plot with a lot of mysteries and puzzles to be slowly unveiled as Elle and her friends work their way through the situation. But right off the bat, I didn't like Elle and so had a hard time understanding why her friends were so dedicated to her. In all honesty, her friends were far more interesting but had little to do in this first volume except flail around and provide context for Elle's unusual family.

Where this book really gets it right, however, is diversity of characters. Elle herself is part Asian and the suspicious doctor in a same-sex relationship. That made the story feel modern and realistic (even if the mother is too 'tiger mom'). But other nuances, such as random cultural references in Elle's mind from Pink Floyd's Money to the Bee Girl, distract rather than add to the story.

The Illustration work inside is clean but also fairly simplistic. There is a lack of background detail that definitely prevents clutter but also takes away depth and interest. The clinical green motif wears after awhile when a background consists only of a blank wall or a window shade. The art feels very digital and clinical itself.

So although not a terrible title by any means, the lack of impetus, focus on tangents in Elle's mindscape rather than plot or character, and simplistic illustration meant I never really had a chance to become engaged. To be honest, I was bored by the story rather than intrigued.

Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2013
If you really like a mystery and storytelling that has a lot of twists, this book is for you. The art work in the book is very solid. McCann really shines in his creator-own book when complex characters. I love the monthly.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 10, 2015
Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Elle Peterssen is left in a coma after an attempt is made on her life. Her spirit form is caught between the land of the living and the dead and she must figure out who attacked her and what the motive was and try and come back to her life. Elle also finds that she can communicate with the living for a short time by taking over the body of person who is about to enter the afterlife and is soon being asked to help other comatose souls before they die.

I liked the supernatural themes in this read, not only has Elle to solve the mystery in spirit form but I would presume the series will also see her trying to use her abilities to help solve other mysteries until she finds her would be killer. I also liked the story of Dane, especially what will happen between him and his father and how he is potentially involved with Elle's accident. As the story progresses it becomes even more difficult to figure out who is responsible for Elle's comatose state with both friends and family under suspicion, it ends on a maddening cliffhanger that has you itching to get the next volume.

The artwork is beautiful with highly detailed panels that pop with colour and use light and dark to amazing effect. The drawing is crisp and clear and there is the added bonus of different covers and sketches at the end of the volume which are all pretty stunning.

Recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Mind The Gap Volume 2: Wish You Were Here TP
Mind The Gap Volume 2: Wish You Were Here TP by Jim McCann (Paperback - July 4, 2013)
$10.09

Mind the Gap Volume 3: Out of Bodies TP
Mind the Gap Volume 3: Out of Bodies TP by Jim McCann (Paperback - October 31, 2013)
$10.09

The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 1: Science Bad
The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 1: Science Bad by Jonathan Hickman (Paperback - September 20, 2012)
$12.33
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.