Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Mindblindness: An Essay on Autism and Theory of Mind Revised ed. Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0262522250
ISBN-10: 026252225X
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$9.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$19.76 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
35 New from $8.99 44 Used from $5.72 1 Collectible from $15.95
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Discover what to read next through the Amazon Book Review. Learn more.
$19.76 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Mindblindness: An Essay on Autism and Theory of Mind
  • +
  • The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language (P.S.)
Total price: $30.07
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

Wow! in this lucid, compelling book Simon Baron-Cohen guides us deep into the realm of the mind.... This fascinating book captures the excitment of an emerging field, and advances that field.

(Henry M. Wellman, University of Michigan)

From the Back Cover

In Mindblindness, Simon Baron-Cohen presents a model of the evolution and development of 'mindreading.' He argues that we mindread all the time, effortlessly, automatically, and mostly un- consciously. It is the natural way in which we interpret, predict, and participate in social behavior and communication. Building on many years of research, Baron-Cohen concludes that children with autism suffer from 'mindblindness' as a result of a selective impairment in mind reading.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Series: Learning, Development, and Conceptual Change
  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: A Bradford Book; Revised ed. edition (February 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 026252225X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262522250
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #510,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There are many books about autism and Asperger's syndrome, but they are all superficial. This is the only one that goes to the source of the problem itself: The brain at the hardware level.
What our consciousness 'sees' is not reality itself, but the output of battalions of highly specialized neurone co-processors that interpret reality in a distorted way engineered by Natural Selection to maximize our chances of surviving and reproducing.
We are blind to the existence of these unconscious perception mechanisms, and we confuse their perception of reality with reality itself. This is the reason why autism has been a mystery for so long, because it is not possible to understand autism without even knowing that these perception instincts exist.
Everything about this book is superlative. Autism is *very* *difficult* to understand even for us autistics, let alone Neurologically Typicals. This guy has the ability to explain autism with concepts that make things rather easy to visualize. Concepts so befitting that leave me wondering how he manages to invent them.
Let me give one example: As a kid, I didn't see people like objects, but I didn't quite see them as people either. They were there, but they were not very important. That is as far as I can go explaining how it was for me. The only thing I can add is that I am not giving you anything more than a faint idea of how it really was.
What does Simon Baron-Cohen do? He introduces the concept of "skinbags." Bags of skin that move and talk like people but that are not quite people.
"Skinbags" is precisely what people were for me. They moved and talked, but they had no feelings.
Read more ›
1 Comment 170 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Baron-Cohen presents a well thought out theory of autism firmly based on his own experimental evidence, as well as that of others. In brief, Baron Cohen postulates that autistic children lack the ability to interpret the mental states of others, and consequently cannot assign mental causes to the actions of others. He explains this in terms of autictics lacking certain postulated mental structures involved in what he calls "mind reading"; for instance, most autistic children do not seem to be able to follow the gaze of another person, a skill that Baron-Cohen believes is central to understanding another's intentions.
While I find his arguments well supported by the data, I do have some differences with him as to the primacy of causation in his model. I would suggest that the reason the analytic mechanisms are absent is that the underlying mental state are absent. For instance, in the writings of one noted high-funtioning autistic, Temple Grandin, she notes that certain mental states having to do with interpersonal relationships are simply unknown to her; she cannot really understand deep friendships and love. To me this suggests not merely the absence of an an analytic and conceptual mechanism, but also the absence of certain physiological correlates that underly the emotions that are a large componant of social attachements.
Regardless, "Mindblindness" is an excellent addition to the theoretical literature of autism and serves as a superb summary of much of the experimental data as well.
Comment 43 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book takes recent cognitive research findings and aligns it with the problems that autistics and other people with non-verbal learning disabilities have in correctly interpreting and responding to social situations. It was a fast read for me and very helpful in assisting me to understand that there is a physical cause for inability to respond appropriately to social situations by learning disabled people. The book actually gave me the intellectual key to forming an appropriate emotional response to LD individuals and in assisting them in learning how to respond appropriately to social situations.
Excellent discussion on eye contact and interpreting actions. Author also provides some interesting observations on intra species communication and how it relates to the evolution of human response in social situations.
Well worth the read if you work with people who have non-verbal learning disabilities or have a child with learning disabilities that encompass the spectrum of autistic disorders. Good tie in to language disabilities and discussion of temporal and frontal region of the brain.
Aimed at both professionals and the lay person, the author has managed to do a good job of straddling both worlds.
Recommended for those people who have managed to finally catch their breath and are over grieving from discovering the consequences of living with an LD individual, and who have managed to proceed to formulating a program of education, personal and familial response to non-verbal disabilities.
While the author made good points about eye contact and subsequent social knowledge, he did fail to discuss those social situations where eye contact would be considered to be aggressive rather than a bonding or friendly situation.
Read more ›
Comment 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Mindblindness: An Essay on Autism and Theory of Mind
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Mindblindness: An Essay on Autism and Theory of Mind

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: cognition