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Mindfulness and Murder: A Father Ananda Mystery Paperback – December 5, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Crime Wave Press (December 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9881655668
  • ISBN-13: 978-9881655660
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 4.9 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,050,630 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nick Wilgus lived and worked in Asia for many years. Titles in his Father Ananda murder-mystery series, which include Mindfulness and Murder, Garden of Hell and Killer Karma, have been translated into French, German, Spanish and Italian. An award-winning movie based on Mindfulness and Murder was released in 2011 by DeWarenne Pictures in Bangkok and nominated for Best Screenplay by the Thailand National Films Awards 2012. Wilgus, who is also the author of The Man Who Got Lost, was recently named best general columnist by the Mississippi Press Association. He lives in Seattle’s Chinatown district..

More About the Author

Nick Wilgus sold his first short story to The Horror Show Magazine at the age of seventeen, and has been writing ever since. His latest novel, SHAKING THE SUGAR TREE, marks his debut as a Southern humorist.

Wilgus is the author of the Father Ananda murder-mystery series: MINDFULNESS AND MURDER, SISTER SUICIDE and KILLER KARMA. He also wrote the script for the award-winning film SOP MAI NGEAP, based on MINDFULNESS AND MURDER, nominated for Best Screenplay by the Thai Film Association.

Writing as Sulayman X, Wilgus penned TEARS OF A DRAGON and KING OF STORMS, fantasy titles that feature positive portrayals of gay characters. He also wrote the Lambda-nominee BILAL'S BREAD, the coming of age story of a Kurdish boy and his family fleeing the violence of Iraq to make a new life in Kansas City.

After spending many years in Bangkok as a journalist working for the Bangkok Post, he now lives in Tupelo, Mississippi and works as a graphic designer.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Barrett on March 15, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The highest compliment one can pay a book is to plan to read more by the author. That's my plan.

The concept of setting a murder in a Bangkok monastery was so original that I had to read Mindfulness and Murder. The author fully delivered in terms of characters and setting and more than delivered with the story.

Besides being a compulsive read, the book presented Buddhist principles in a totally nonintrusive and engaging way that was totally integrated with the story line and character development. This first book in a unique and engaging series will have readers, like me, wanting more.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kathryn A. Morse on November 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Finally an author combines Buddhism with the murder mystery genre. To me, Mindfulness and Murder follows the tradition of the Brother Cadfael or Sister Frevisse mysteries. And since Buddhism is a growing practice in the West, the Father Ananda mysteries set in a Buddhist monastery in Thailand meet a need for "recreational" Buddhist themed reading.

In Mindfulness and Murder, Nick Wilgus presents us with believable characters possessing the typical human frailties and typical human capacities for strength and wisdom. Murder mysteries in religious settings always offer the juxtaposition of horrible human behavior against the ideal human behavior and show how people deal with the tension between the two extremes. Wilgus introduces us to not just the monastery, but the neighborhood with both its likable everyday characters and unlikable criminal element. We can relate because the neighborhood is like so many of our own neighborhoods, but we can experience the unfamiliar, too, because the book is set in Thailand.

Mindfulness and Murder is an easy read and not too long - long enough to enjoy, but not to tax your time. I found it fun to read a novel set in Thailand as I am one of many Americans who has considered moving there because the cost of living is cheaper. I look forward to reading the other Father Ananda mysteries.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gloria Jaguden on November 3, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very well written book with all of the elements present which readers of "mysteries" want: an interesting protagonist, interesting atmosphere, satisfactory plot.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Janet Brown on November 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
What! A mystery set in Bangkok without a bargirl to be seen, in which the detective is completely Thai and a Buddhist monk to boot? Yes, that's right--Father Ananda is a man who observes all of the 227 precepts that are asked of Theravada monks, which means no alcohol, no nicotine, no sins of the flesh--not even coffee passes his lips. He's a far cry from most of the crime-solvers in Bangkok--but then authors write about what they know and author Nick Wilgus clearly knows more about Bangkok than what can be seen from a bar stool.

When a body is found inside a large water jar in one of the temple's bathrooms, eyes gouged out, skin embellished with cigarette burns, and a large yellow candle jammed into its mouth, Father Ananda is one of the first to know. Before taking his vows, he was a police officer, a man all too familiar with the smell of death, and his abbot charges him with the task of finding who the murderer might be, working with the police from the privileged position of a monastic insider.

The dead body is that of Noi, one of the temple boys, street kids who find food and shelter on sacred ground. Like many of them, this boy has a past filled with drugs, violence, and sexual abuse. Father Ananda soon discovers that Noi had been part of a drug-trafficking ring within the temple--one that may involve the monks themselves. When one of the monks disappears, leaving a hidden cache of drugs behind, Father Ananda is certain that some of his monastic brothers are not who they pretend to be.

Mindfulness and Murder introduces one of the most intriguing detectives since Hercules Poirot and "his little grey cells." Father Ananda is a complex character who became a monk after his wife and son were slaughtered in an act of underworld retaliation.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chance on September 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
After reading the Rules of Ten series, this was a suggested book and I thought it would hold me over until the next Ten book was published. The story is ok - seems to drag a bit, and be overly wordy - but what really bugs me is that there are a LOT of errors and very poor editing. I expect a story to flow when I read it, and I find myself stumbling over the errors. Just ok. Read the Ten Series (First Rule of Ten, Second Rule of Ten, Broken Rules of Ten) if you like this kind of book. The Trilogy of Lhasa is also a very good one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bookaddict on July 31, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Like other readers, I was intrigued by the idea of a murder mystery set in a Bangkok Buddhist monastery. I found Father Ananda to be an interesting character and the plot engaging with reasonable hypotheses and twists. I learned a bit about monasteries and Buddhism in Thailand and especially about mindfulness. However, this novel does not hold a candle to the strikingly beautiful and meaningful Inspector Shan series set in Tibet; those books by Eliot Pattison teach more about Buddhism and the country's political situation and have the power to change the way the reader looks at the world. Nor does the writing of Mindfulness and Murder measure up. Like other reviewers, I found the typos to be very annoying, and there is some poor writing as well (comma splices, mixing of present and past tense in the same sentence). Nevertheless, I liked the novel overall and intend to read Book 2.

Addendum: The award-winning Thai film of this book is now available with English subtitles for rental through Distrify. Some of the photography is beautiful, but the dialogue is sparse. The movie will be easier to follow for those who have read the book. https://widgets.distrify.com/widget.html#5823-now_options-language:en-impression:36712229
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