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Mingus at Antibes CD


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Audio CD, CD, October 27, 2009
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 27, 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Atlantic
  • Run Time: 60 minutes
  • ASIN: B000008BRQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,647 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting
2. Prayer For Passive Resistance
3. What Love?
4. I'll Remember April
5. Folk Forms
6. Better Git Hit In Your Soul

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Mingus at Antibes by Charles Mingus

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Amazon.com

The fleet group that Charles Mingus brought to the Antibes jazz festival in 1960 was likely the most powerful group, pound-for-pound, that the bassist ever led. The front line was comprised of trumpeter Ted Curson, alto saxophonist Eric Dolphy, and, for this stint, tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin. Without a piano for most of this Antibes concert, the band relied on a combustion that Mingus created with his antiphonal compositions and a gospel bent. Dolphy, Curson, and Ervin sound jubilant on "Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting" and then full of longing on "Prayer for Passive Resistance." But it's on "Folk Forms I" that you hear how much leap the group has without a formal harmonic anchor. Mingus chugs along, using his lowest-end bustle as a backbone for rhythmic variations across the top. As usual, drummer Dannie Richmond cracks the percussion with speed-shifting exactness. As if that all weren't enough, one of bebop's quirkier architects, Bud Powell, joins the band for a touching read of "I'll Remember April." --Andrew Bartlett

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
5
3 star
1
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0
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See all 20 customer reviews
You will be moved.
MusicFreak
There is a spirituality to most Mingus live albums that is very evident here , especially in the playing of saxmen Eric Dolphy and Booker Ervin.
Ahmed Chronwell
This is without a doubt one of the truly `essential' recordings of our time - jazz or otherwise.
Larry L. Looney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By M. Allen Greenbaum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 3, 2001
Format: Audio CD
from California
Recorded live at the Antibes Jazz Festival in 1960, this CD presents some of Mingus' best live output, as well as superlative solo playing. At over 70 minutes long, with excellent, detailed liner notes by Robert Palmer, this is a must have for any jazz fan of the period. Perhaps not as wholly satisfying as "Ah Um" or "Oh Yeah," it is still a brilliant achievement.
"Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting" (11:54) is in the Mingus tradition of jazz/gospel/folk forms and features Ted Curson on trumpet and Eric Dolphy on alto sax. These horns produce torrents of sound against Mingus' turbulent bass and Dannie Richmond's cascades of percussion. Booker Ervin blows an extended Texas/avant-garde sax solo, wailing and zigzagging with Curson's trumpet. Amid some hand clapping and a minimal background, Dolphy overlays some outstanding and exciting work. Mingus' varied bass riffs are superbly imaginative (and well recorded)--this piece cooks! A nice messy gumbo of texture, sound, and jazz history.
"Prayer for Passive Resistance" (8:06) opens with a slap bass blues figure, while Booker Ervin blows some simple, soulful blues and squawks. Ervin's full tones sound very "present," while Mingus and the rhythm section get increasingly rapid and abstract. Overall, this song evolves rapidly between simplicity and complexity, perhaps reflecting the many implications of its title. The ending, returns to the opening prayer/blues format, perhaps a simple call to resolute action.
Mingus varied the song "What Is This Thing Called Love" many times; his "What Love" (13:34) on the 'Antibes' CD is a thoughtful, balletic composition.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 19, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Very progressive music for its time -- even for what Mingus was doing in the studio during this "Golden Age." From a music historian's perspective, it does rate five stars for that reason, and also because this is probably the best live recording that we have of Mingus. The music itself is also wonderful, except that Bud Powell's never-ending, never-interesting piano solo on I'll Remember April is, indeed, truly lame. If you are on a tight budget, I would opt first for Mingus Ah Um, Picanthropus Erectus, and (Mingus' masterpiece, in my opinion) The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady. On the other hand, those are not live recordings so my advice would be to splurge and get this one, too. Hey, it's Mingus, and that is a beautiful thing.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By MusicFreak on December 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Where to start? Listening to this album, I wonder if I would have been able to prevent myself from fainting had I been present at Juan les Pins seeing Mingus live. You see, the urgency, the virtuosity, the volatile elements that Mingus so effortlessly combines here make for some intense and challenging listening. And, when I say virtuosity, I mean it in both ways - individually and collectively. Every musician here is a master of his instrument, yet the almost telepathic communication between them is nothing short of miraculous. On "Better Git Hit in your soul", the band shifts tempos, meters and feels, and sections where the clapping of the band members is the only accompaniment, while the soloists soar in the stratosphere. The effect on me is incredible, even physical - I have stopped breathing sometimes! I wonder if Dolphy is even human. His playing here is pure fire, an incessant barrage of sound that never sounds repetitive and ignites the band to indescribable heights. Yet, he can also be pensive without losing his edge, as he does in "What Love?" - his trialogue with Mingus and Danny must be heard to be believed. Bass and bass clarinet dancing together like a choreographed couple, yet it is improvised. I don't want to ramble on. Just get this if you like Jazz or just creative music by creative musicians. You will be challenged. You will be moved. You will be swept off your feet. You will be different.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S. Finefrock VINE VOICE on July 29, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Picking the best recording by Charles Mingus is next to impossible for me, he has numerous works that are nothing short of essential for any music(not just jazz) fan. As far as live albums however, it is hard to find any in jazz, or in other genre's that match this set for pure intensity. The band at Antibes included Mingus(bass), Booker Ervin(sax), Eric Dolphy(sax, clarinet, Dannie Richmond(drums)and Ted Curson(trumpet), all fine players on their respective instruments. On this recording all invloved play with white hot intensity, spurred on by Mingus' feral cries and exhortations. On PFPR Ervin plays gutbucket saxophone drenched in blues. Eric Dolphy nearly spontaniously combusts on several tracks with some of his most fierce playing. Legendary pianist Bud Powell drops in on I'll Remember April, which meanders quite a bit, but does give the listener a chance to catch his breathe before the next onslaught. The band connects the dots between primal blues, free jazz and gospel creating surging, swinging, unrelenting beast. Highly, highly recommended.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M. Allen Greenbaum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on September 22, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Recorded live at the Antibes Jazz Festival in 1960, this CD presents some of Mingus' best live output, as well as superlative solo playing. At over 70 minutes long, with excellent, detailed liner notes by Robert Palmer, this is a must have for any jazz fan of the period. Perhaps not as wholly satisfying as "Ah Um" or "Oh Yeah," it is still a brilliant achievement.
"Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting" (11:54) is in the Mingus tradition of jazz/gospel/folk forms and features Ted Curson on trumpet and Eric Dolphy on alto sax. These horns produce torrents of sound against Mingus' turbulent bass and Dannie Richmond's cascades of percussion. Booker Ervin blows an extended Texas/avant-garde sax solo, wailing and zigzagging with Curson's trumpet. Amid some hand clapping and a minimal background, Dolphy overlays some outstanding and exciting work. Mingus' varied bass riffs are superbly imaginative (and well recorded)--this piece cooks! A nice messy gumbo of texture, sound, and jazz history.
"Prayer for Passive Resistance" (8:06) opens with a slap bass blues figure, while Booker Ervin blows some simple, soulful blues and squawks. Ervin's full tones sound very "present," while Mingus and the rhythm section get increasingly rapid and abstract. Overall, this song evolves rapidly between simplicity and complexity, perhaps reflecting the many implications of its title. The ending, returns to the opening prayer/blues format, perhaps a simple call to resolute action.

Mingus varied the song "What Is This Thing Called Love" many times; his "What Love" (13:34) on the `Antibes' CD is a thoughtful, balletic composition. Mingus plays some beautiful, high register notes while the trumpet plays searching, somewhat melancholic tones. It is almost a prayer; a backdrop for contemplation.
Read more ›
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