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Miracle's Boys Audio CD – 2001


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Books On Tape (2001)
  • ISBN-10: 0739337777
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739337776
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,765,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jacqueline Woodson's awards include 3 Newbery Honors, a Coretta Scott King Award and 3 Coretta Scott King Honors, 2 National Book Awards, a Margaret A. Edwards Award and an ALAN Award -- both for Lifetime Achievement in YA Literature. She is the author of more than 2 dozen books for children and young adults and lives with her family in Brooklyn, New York

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Teresa on June 5, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Miracle's Boys is a beautifully written story about the relationship between three half-black, half-Puerto Rican brothers living in New York City. It's a great book for boys who aren't big readers and anyone who wants a good story. The novel is dialogue driven and told by Lafayette who is twelve and coming to terms with his mother's death (a death he feels responsible for). Charlie who is fifteen has just returned from a juvenile detention center and Ty'ree, at twenty-one, has given up a college scholarship to take care of his brothers. At times sad, often elegant, this novel is ultimately powerful and honest. Woodson's genius lies in her ability to be subtle. There is nothing heavy-handed about Miracle's Boys. It's a beautiful, extremely well-written book. This reader wanted it to go on and on.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By KidsReads on July 13, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Lafayette never got a chance to meet his father; his dad died before Lafayette was even born. Though he misses having a dad to do boy stuff with, Lafayette didn't know the man enough to miss him personally. When his mother dies, though, Lafayette is crushed. He misses her terribly --- every day, with every thought.
Lafayette's oldest brother Ty'ree misses their mother just as much. With both parents gone, Ty'ree is now responsible raising Laf and also looking out for middle brother Charlie who has just returned from doing time in a juvenile detention center. In addition to being full of sorrow, Ty'ree is bitter: If he didn't have to look after his younger brothers, Ty'ree would have been able to attend college. Now, he works like a dog in the mailroom for a big company and is tired all the time from trying to make ends meet. Laf tries not to ask too many questions, or cry too much, or to want things they can't afford. On top of it all, Charlie just keeps acting out and getting in trouble. If he caught by the police again, Charlie and Laf will be made wards of the court.
Author Woodson has a wonderful talent for writing about kids in tough situations. You really understand how someone in Laf's position might feel. This is a touching novel about a family trying to stay afloat through some really hard times. Their mother, whose name was Milagro, (Miracle in Spanish) was the center of the family and held them together. Now they must rely on each other while learning to deal with the death of their mother. They already got their one miracle --- can they stick together without one?
This is a quiet novel that you can read quickly. All the action takes place in one day, but it never feels hurried or too busy.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tyler Thomas Arnott on February 27, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is about three boys (Ty'Ree, Charlie and Lafayette.) Their mom and dad both
died. So now Ty'Ree has to take care of Charlie and Lafayette. Charlie is not very good.
He was sent to Rahway, which is like a type of jail for kids. He tried to rob a candy store.
While Charlie was gone his mom died. Charlie is now friends with another mean person.
His name is Aaron. Ty'ree and Charlie are both very nice people. This was a very good
book for people between the ages of eleven and fourteen. This book kept me interested
pretty much throughout the whole book. It was very exciting. I would recommend this
book to anybody who is struggling with family problems, or anything else having to do
with their family. Ty'Ree is very smart. Ty'Ree passed up college to take care of Charlie
and Lafayette. He used to go to the park and launch off rockets with his friends. He was
accepted to MIT. People call him St. Ty'Ree since he is so nice. Lafayette (Laf) is always
very nice. He calls Charlie Newcharlie. This is because after Charlie went to Rahway he
came back mean. Charlie calls him a Milagro killer. This is because their mother's name
was Milagro. Spanish for miracle. When Charlie was in Rahway their mother died. Laf
was the first one to see his mother dead. She died of an insulin attack from her diabetes.
He didn't call for help for awhile. It wouldn't have mattered though because she was
already dead. Charlie still calls him Milagro killer though. Charlie used to like animals
like dogs and cats a lot. Once he tried to save a dog that was hit by a car. Almost everyday
he called the vet to see if it was still alive. Then, one day he called and it was dead. He
felt very sad about that.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I found this to be a powerful story. Woodson carefully unfurls the story of three brothers who must make a life together after losing both of their parents. The story takes place during a two day time period with flashbacks to bring us to the present. A must read for teens dealing with the death of a parent.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 1, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I think Miracle's Boys is a great book, the way it talks about a family of three brothers who parents had died. I like the fact that the oldest brother becomes the two other brother's legal guardian. The reason why i like that is becauses it shows how much the oldest brother cares about his family. He cared so much about his family that he dropped out of college to make sure that they live a good life and don't throw it away. Lafayette, the youngest child, is very curious about what had happened to his mamma and his daddy, always asking questions about them. The middle child, Charlie, is the trouble maker in the family. He's been away at Juvie for two years for stealing money from a candy store. When he get's out, he just doesn't learn and continues to get in trouble until he learns how much his family needs him and how much he needs his family. I respect Jacqueline Woodson because she describes what it's like growing up without a mamma and a daddy. She writes about real life controversies.
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