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Mirage Hardcover – 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 452 pages
  • Publisher: ibooks (2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0739411500
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739411506
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,916,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I began wanting to be a writer, and veered off into photography in high school. This was probably a good thing, since there were no decent instructors in either in my school, and I was rather bad at the writing. I became fairly good at photography. All my pursuits have had public aspects--art, music, literature. I'm something of a ham when I have an audience, but I'm self-conscious about my abilities. Nevertheless, I love the doing. I attended Clarion in 1988 where I finally learned how to write and also made some of the best friends of my life--Kelley Eskridge, Nicola Griffith, Daryl Gregory, Brooks Caruthers, Peg Kerr--and gained a decade of wisdom in six weeks (at least it feels like that).

I could have done none of this without my partner, Donna, to whom I owe what happiness I have--and I think I have quite a lot.

Customer Reviews

This is a great piece of Science Fiction!
Fred
If you are (or were) a fan of Asimovs ROBOT series, these two books will re-ignite the passion.
mike bracuti
Parts of the plot is a bit to ambiguous for my taste.
Simon Laub

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Martin Asiner on December 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
When a prolific and profitable author like Isaac Asimov dies, his publishers do not believe that his death ought to mark the end of the publishing gravy train. After Asimov's death, his Foundation and Robot universes were novelized again by several writers, most notably David Brin, Gregory Benford, Roger MacBride Allen, and now most recently with Mark Tiedemann with MIRAGE. It is not overly difficult to duplicate the style of Asimov; it is his substance that remains elusive. Tiedemann writes of the robotic future of earth that had not yet morphed into a galactic empire. This empire is staunchly anti-robotic, with much opposition coming from decadent Spacer worlds that require robots to maintain their own self-loathing existences. On earth, a number of humans and Spacers are assassinated by unknown assailants, throwing into jeopardy a major treaty between earth and the Spacer worlds. The problem with Tiedemann is that his characters speak with the Asimovian twang but lack its inner emotional resonance. Tiedemann seems unclear as to who his protagonist should be. Instead he divides center stage between Special Agent Mia Daventri and roboticist Derec Avery, neither of whom is sufficiently interesting to involve the reader. Nowhere in MIRAGE does Tiedemann cause the reader to care about an increasingly volatile symbiotic relationship between man and robot. Roger MacBride Allen was far more successfull in his trilogy of Asimov inspired robot novels. If the reader wants to get further involved in a post Asimovian universe of conflict between man and robot, then this reader has little choice but to hope that writers like Tiedemann learn their craft well enough to make him care about how humans interact with both altered humans and robots. The real test of any novel lies in its ability to cause the reader to think of it long after he closes the flyleaf. Sadly, MIRAGE failed to deliver.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By cprise on October 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book was an enjoyable, engrossing read. Derek and Ariel fit the story nearly perfectly, esp. for anyone who has read the Robot City novels. That the author does not explicitly refer to their history permits the characters some added depth (you sense they have grown since Robot City).
The role of Bogard was handled with great aplomb; Better, in fact, than in the original Robot City novels. The descriptions of its weird behavior were not overbearing, and lent a "Day the Earth Stood Still" flavor to some scenes.
One thing bothers me. The plot does not sufficiently plant enough emotional investment in Aurora's leadership role (ostensibly respectful and just compared with pre-Fastolfe/Bailey Aurora) to reward the reader with much impact at the end when Solaria's role is brought into focus. The shift in interstellar policy should have a similar feel to the climaxes in Robots and Empire, or Foundation and Earth; One of the things I like so much about Asimov stories is the feel of historical import on a scale that challenges me.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Chris MB on April 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Asimov universe has been respectfully added to since his untimely death - first there were the Robot City novels, then came the new Robot novels by Allen and then the Second Foundation Trilogy. And now this, a new Robot novel. In truth, while there have been some dissappointments, most of the new novels set in Asimov's universe have been fairly good. As is this offering.
In Mirage, the author does a very good job capturing the sense of mystery Asimov used in his own novels. He also shows a good grasp of Asimov's ideas and universe.
What is surprising to me is the fact that no history is mentioned about the main characters who spent 6 novels together in the Robot City chronicles. Nor is any indication given as to when this story fits into the Asimov timeline - while the reader can certainly guess, the author could have thrown the reader some sort of lifeline from the original Asimov books to let us know what else was going on.
At any rate, its an interesting read. Very nice to see that the spirit of Asimov is well remembered and appreciated.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
a new robot mystery that respects Asimov's three laws of robotics and then succeeds as sf...Tiedemann fulfills his short works' appeal with this amazing first full-length effort
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Simon Laub on February 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
Mark W. Tiedemann's Mirage is a fairly complex SF novel. Corporate and political conspiracy behind the slaughter of diplomats for the advancement of some hidden agenda.
There are some pretty good dialoque and ideas floating around. I especially enjoyed the ones like : "The Church of organic Sapiens extended the belief into the religious, claiming that the true nature of humankind was pretechnological, that Eden had contained no machines."
However to really follow in the footsteps of master Asimov the historical import into this setting should have been easier to follow. What is the context of this corporate and political conspiracy. Where are we headed ? What did this mean to galactic history ? The shift in interstellar policy should have had a similar feel to the climaxes in the original stories. But I don't think they have - or if so, I didn't get it ?
The Asimov universe has been respectfully added to since Asimovs death - Compare Mirage with e.g. the Second Foundation Trilogy, especially the novel by Hugo and Nebula award winner David Brin. I simply think Mirage falls short. David Brin adds to the universe, explains and pushes us forward. Here the grand scale of things isn't as pinned out, Are we waiting for enlightment in a coming novel ? I don't know. But I do know that Asimov balanced complexity with a simplicity that I somehow miss here. Parts of the plot is a bit to ambiguous for my taste. Still it has its good spells also.
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