Mirages: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anais Nin, 1939-1947 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $34.95
  • Save: $6.67 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Connecting readers with great books since 1972. Used books may not include companion materials, some shelf wear, may contain highlighting/notes, and may not include cd-rom or access codes. Customer service is our top priority!
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $10.16
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Mirages: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anais Nin, 1939-1947 Hardcover – November 1, 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$28.28
$24.28 $21.00
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Frequently Bought Together

Mirages: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anais Nin, 1939-1947 + Henry and June: From "A Journal of Love" -The Unexpurgated Diary of Anais Nin (1931-1932) + The Diary of Anais Nin, Vol. 1: 1931-1934
Price for all three: $52.40

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 440 pages
  • Publisher: Swallow Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080401146X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804011464
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #543,739 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This volume collects material that Nin (1903–1977) had excised from previous diaries—in particular, volumes 3 and 4—while her husband and lovers were still alive. The diary opens at the beginning of WWII as Nin and her husband, banker Hugh Guiler, escape Paris for New York City, and ends in 1947 when she meets Rupert Pole, the one lover who satisfied her. At times desperate and suicidal, she finds life more fulfilling when it conforms to her dreams—a series of mirages she conjures to avoid reality, the horrors of war, and an America she finds abysmally immature. Often in a state of semi-delirium where she finds herself drowning in her unconscious, she writes that she needs love so abnormally that it all seems natural to keep several relationships going at once, all the one and the same love. Her lovers included Henry Miller, 17-year-old Bill Pinckard, Edmund Wilson, and dozens of others, including an emotionally charged, but physically unfulfilled, relationship with Gore Vidal. Whether or not one sees this work, as Houghton Mifflin did when they considered these diaries for publication in 1942, as the ultimate in neurotic self-absorption, Nin fans will embrace the book's emotional intensity and sensuality. (Oct.)

Review

“In Mirages, she stands before us, stripped bare, unmasked, triumphant, among her cast of sacred and noires bêtes (Gore Vidal, Henry Miller, et al.) now revealed, by name, as who and what they were to her. Mirages exposes, reveals and humanizes Nin as much more than the sum of heavily edited parts.”

Elizabeth Boleman-Herring, author of The Visitors' Book (or Silva Rerum): An Erotic Fable


Mirages provides a treasure of newly disclosed Nin sentiments. Nin transcends self-reflection and offers a glimpse into what women feel but are rarely able to articulate, whether about daily experiences, or love gained and lost. With intense passion, her powerfully seductive prose shares insights, observations, and confessions about the human psyche. Highly recommended.“

Diana Raab, author of Dear Anaïs: My Life in Poems for You


“Henry Miller called her a ‘masterpiece’ and the greatest ‘fabulist’ he had ever known. Her brother Joaquin referred to her as a ‘steel hummingbird.’ As for me, she was a myth in her own time, the Scheherazade of the diary genre, and epitomizes Harold Bloom’s observation in Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, to wit, ‘Romance, literary and human, depends on partial or imperfect knowledge.’”

Barbara Kraft, author of Anaïs Nin: The Last Days and The Restless Spirit: Journal of a Gemini


“Readers will find Nin a most entertaining companion—her multiple simultaneous relationships with men, her gleefully graphic descriptions of sex acts.... In one late entry, Nin complains, mildly: ‘My world is so large I get lost in it‘; readers will do the same—and gratefully so.”—Kirkus Reviews


"At times desperate and suicidal, (Nin) finds life more fulfilling when it conforms to her dreams—a series of mirages she conjures to avoid reality, the horrors of war, and an America she finds abysmally immature…. Nin fans will embrace the book's emotional intensity and sensuality.”—Publishers Weekly


“This fifth in a series of unexpurgated diary volumes by American novelist and short story and erotica writer Nin (House of Incest; Delta of Venus) covers a period longer than any other volume to date…. Nin's life was steeped in secrecy, lies, passion, longing, and introspection, perhaps the most so during this period. Of the unexpurgated diary volumes thus far, this one benefits the most from full disclosure, illustrating the greater extents of Nin's fragility and ferocity and revealing dimensions of the writer that deeply enrich the reading of her work.”—Library Journal


"The fifth volume in the unexpurgated series that is gradually replacing the earlier, sanitized edition of Nin’s famous diary begins with her 1939 flight from war-shadowed Paris to New York and tracks her struggles to adapt to America and reconfigure her writing life…. Nin—calculating, theatrical, and prodigious—provides cascading insights into the traumas that made her a ‘demon of intensity’ determined to turn her life into a literary work of unique psychological revelation.”—Booklist

More About the Author

Anaïs Nin (1903-1977) was born in Paris and aspired at an early age to be a writer. An influential artist and thinker, she wrote primarily fiction until 1964, when her last novel, Collages, was published. She wrote The House of Incest, a prose-poem (1936), three novellas collected in The Winter of Artifice (1939), short stories collected in Under a Glass Bell (1944), and a five-volume continuous novel consisting of Ladders to Fire (1946), Children of the Albatross (1947), The Four-Chambered Heart (1950), A Spy in the House of Love (1954), and Seduction of the Minotaur (1961). These novels were collected as Cities of the Interior (1974). She gained commercial and critical success with the publication of the first volume of her diary (1966); to date, fifteen diary volumes have been published. Her most commercially successful books were her erotica published as Delta of Venus (1977) and Little Birds (1979). Today, her books are appearing digitally, most notably The Portable Anaïs Nin (2011).

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
By 1977 she was dead and very much missed.
Amazon Customer
Her loneliness sends her on a quest: to find one love who will satisfy her longing for emotional connection.
bookkitten
I'm hoping there will be yet another volume that includes the relationship with Rupert Pole.
Adele Aldridge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jim Morris VINE VOICE on November 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Only about halfway through at this point, but enjoying it mightily. Nin's diaries are perfect for when you only have ten minutes here or twenty minutes there to read them, as the entries are short. This particular volume seems to encompass the period of the greatest unhappiness in her life, but then again this is Anais Nin, so she squeezes in some terrific hot sex into her general ennui. And, as always, Nin provides a feast of language. I've just been reading some letters passed back and forth with Henry Miller toward the end of their relationship. She manages the difficult feat of making him look like a reasonable person. She can only be described as distraught during this period, and manages to find insult in Miller's most conciliatory passages.
But I still love the diaries. Taken altogether this is your best chance to really know a person through a lifetime of their most intimate thoughts.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Velma Bowen on December 25, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I think that this might be my favorite of the "unexpurgated diaries," because it's not quite so self-aggrandizing as other ones. The editors balanced praise with thoughtful introspection and more looks outside of Nin's own head.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bookkitten on January 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This wonderfully-weighty slice of an almost eight-year period in Anais Nin's life is fascinating. It begins when she returns to America, depressed to leave Europe at the dawn of World War II, and in a state of confused dissatisfaction over her love life. She's in her mid-thirties and has been married for many years, but has not been satisfied in her marriage. She has been strongly influenced by European ideas and has taken lovers, most notably Henry Miller, but she finds herself feeling intensely lonely in America. For one, she misses the intense artistic camaraderie she enjoyed in Paris. Her loneliness sends her on a quest: to find one love who will satisfy her longing for emotional connection. The forms this quest takes can be pretty shocking: Nin has affairs with many men, all the while analyzing herself and trying to find the reasons for her "hunger," and the many resulting affairs constitute the "mirages" referred to in the title. At one point Nin even called herself a "nymphomaniac." Finally, at the end of this particular journey, Nin meets a man who loves her the way she wants to be loved -- both emotionally and physically. Kudos to the editor, Paul Herron, who searched through Nin's original diaries, found these passages that had not been previously published, and saw to it that this story was brought out in the light of day! It's a wonderful tale of human desire and fulfillment!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Adele Aldridge on March 4, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having read all of Anaïs Nin's books, starting when they were first published, years before she died, and then the unexpurgated volumes became available, I had to read this one. This book, those pages left out in between the other events of her life, is mostly about her sex life. Yes, there is an interesting string of letters between Nin and Henry Miller that illuminates her break with Miller, but the other pages are about all the many liaisons Anaïs had with younger men after she left Paris and is living in New York. Sometimes she has sex with three people in one day. One lover was only 17 at the time. Perhaps in today's world she would be arrested for child molestation.

I found Nin's long section on her relationship with the young twenty year old, Gore Vidal when she was in her forties, interesting. They did not consummate the relationship with sex because he was gay but the relationship was intimate and full of love between them and ends badly. I know there then became an angry bitter feud between Vidal and Nin but this book only hints at that. I will have to read more about Gore Vidal's personal life to learn more about what happened.

I'm struck by reading about all these sex activities that if we were reading about the same thing in the life of a man people would not find it shocking or make judgements. It has been considered manly to have notches in one's belt, and slutty for a woman to have many sexual encounters - especially with all relationships going on at the same time.

Mirages ends with Anaïs meeting Rupert Pole, the man she was living with when she died. Pole was her second husband while she was also married Hugo. How she managed all these relationships is mind boggling to think about.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is amazing as a historical document with incredible insight into American culture (then and perhaps now). There really is nothing else quite like Nin's diary as a piece of literature or as a historical record. Nin becomes a full-grown monster, and, really, predator over the course of the book, but that just makes it all the more fascinating. She was a beautiful monster, that wrote like an angel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again