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Miscarriage of Justice: A Novel Paperback – Bargain Price, May 4, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Center Street (May 4, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1599951975
  • ASIN: B0046LUXHY
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,860,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Nashville Circuit Court judge Gayden's mixed debut tracks a tragic love story that begins at a Tennessee Christian summer camp in 1896. There, pastor's daughter Anna Dennis, 16, and Walter Dotson, a third-year Vanderbilt medical student, fall hard for each other. By winter, he's interning at her local hospital, and their courtship and early married life—including a stint in Vienna, where daughter Mabel is born—have all the trappings of a conventional romance. By 1908, the family numbers four and settles in Gallatin, Tenn., near Anna and Walter's hometowns, but a miscarriage sets the stage for murder and scandal. Gayden's writing in the romance sections is flat and unconvincing, but perks up in the last quarter, when the novel goes full-on procedural, delivering the murder trial and the related media coverage in close detail. The trial, based on real events, is intriguing, the verdict unexpected and period detail adds depth. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"With MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE, Kip Gayden has accomplished what every historic fiction writer dreams he or she will be able to do. He has unlocked a forgotten crime and the lives around it and brings a lost time and place back to life. He holds us captive as his tale unfolds. MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE seems far more like the work of a seasoned writer than a judge with the ability to tell a good story." (Robert Hicks, 'New York Times' bestselling author of 'The Widow of the South' )

"A fascinating novel with a twist at the end." (Nashville Bar Journal Marjorie Kaup Haines )

"Sometimes true crime can lead to fascinating fiction. But who would have thought a sordid case in a small Tennessee town in 1913 would spawn an absorbing read?" (Richmond Times Dispatch )

"Judge Kip Gayden has written a wonderfully woven mixture of fact and fiction... . Judge Kip's well defined characters will engulf you deeper and deeper into its pages...so be forewarned that you will not be able to put this book down until its final page." (Nashville.About.com )

"If you're a fan of historical fiction and/or true crime--or if you're just in the mood for a really great read--I highly recommend this book. I would love to see more from Kip Gayden in the future." (NightsandWeekends.com )

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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I highly recommend this wonderful book for a quick and easy read.
Maizie Lucille James
For anyone interested in historical fiction or non-fiction, court room drama, or true crime books, this is the perfect choice.
Chris
I hope that Gayden takes my advice for his next book, which I look forward to reading!
Christina Lockstein

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By C. A. Hopkins on March 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
With tremendous attention to detail, Judge Gayden does an incredible job of transporting the reader back in time to the late 1800s when young Christian camp counselor, Walter Dotson, first meets young Miss Anna Dennis, a pastor's daughter, and the two set upon a course that will later shape history. While the book is basically historical fiction, it is based on actual events, and Judge Gayden artfully weaves a tale based on newspaper clippings (included in the book), and I wouldn't be the least bit surprised to find that his rendition was exactly how events transpired. He does such an excellent job developing his characters that their actions come as no surprise, and we love and loathe them as he'd planned.

The main characters are Anna (Dennis) Dotson and her husband, Dr. Walter Dotson, both pillars of their community. They had been madly in love and wildly happy until Anna has a miscarriage, causing Walter's attentions to wane. The book is an excellent study on the human condition and how a family that appears on the surface to have everything can be hiding all sorts of secrets. There were many times during the story, however, that Dr. Dotson had it within his power to change the course of events had he only been a bit less self-centered and actually taken the time to listen to his wife. Judge Gayden does an excellent job of garnering the reader's sympathies for Anna and also making the reader feel as if her husband owes her. He also does a wonderful job of painting Charlie Cobb as a contemptible cad who isn't about to let Anna go once getting his clutches on her. Shades of a Victorian Basic Instinct, if you will.

Even more exciting than the human aspects of the story, is the legal wrangling that takes place.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Christina Lockstein on January 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Miscarriage of Justice by Kip Gayden is the story of Anna And Walter Dotson in 1913 Tennessee. Walter is a successful physician, Bible study leader, alderman for the city of Gallatin, Mason, and leader of the city orchestra. Anna is the lovely mother of their two children who keeps her days busy with the social functions required of the wife of a pillar of the community. She also spends time flirting with the cause of woman's suffrage and the new barber in town: Charlie Cobb. Gayden weaves together historical fact with logical conjecture to create a fantastic story of how a crime in a small town in Tennessee helped shape the future of the nation. Anna's flirtation with Charlie leaps into full blown adultery, with both spouses left in the dark. Gayden describes the attraction of forbidden liasons with flair and emotion. He makes Anna's descent into lust as believable as her guilt over the double life she finds herself living. Gayden uses reporter Paul Christian as the reader's objective eye in the story, and as we hear the story filtered through him, it becomes not only believable but enthralling. The crime is shocking; the verdict even more so. Gayden introduced suffrage as a major story element in the opening chapters, but that line drops off until suddenly popping up in the jury room when the ties between the crime and suffrage become clear, and with a masterful stroke Gayden makes his case that this long forgotten crime of passion helped give women the right to vote in America. By fictionalizing the portions of the book, Gayden brings Anna and the rest of the cast to life, and you can't help but ache for her. My one and only complaint is a small one: I would have liked pictures of the principals to be included in the book. I hope that Gayden takes my advice for his next book, which I look forward to reading!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By RJ McGill on April 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Miscarriage of Justice is based on the actual events surrounding a 1913's love triangle gone horribly and irrevocably wrong. Kip Gayden has delivered an impressive novel that is as exciting as the crime and verdict were shocking. Anna and Walter Dotson were prominent members of the small Tennessee community of Gallatin. Walter, in addition to being a very successful physician, was active in numerous community activities, Masonic Lodge, church bible study and city orchestra leader, and he also had political aspirations. While Walter was attending various groups and meetings, his wife, Anna, was home with her two children. There's a pointed change in the marriage after Anna miscarries their third child, all the romance and intimacy the couple had once shared was drained from the relationship. As time and time again Walter rejects his wife's attempts to rekindle the romantic fires, she is left feeling lonely and unfulfilled.

When Charlie Cobb and his family moved to town, he began working at the local barbershop and quickly became Walter Dotson's favorite barber. It isn't long before the flirtations between Charlie and Anna spiral into a full blown affair. They are both so consumed by the affair and finding ways to be together they fail to recognize the whispers, quiet nods and gossip, that eventually reach Walter. With her adulterous behavior exposed, Anna confessed her actions to her husband and then at his behest, to her brother. What follows is a crime that rocked the small Tennessee community to its core and a controversial verdict that would ultimately play a roll in the women's rights movement.
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