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Miss Happiness and Miss Flower Paperback – March 7, 2008


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Paperback, March 7, 2008
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan Children's Books (March 7, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330456326
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330456326
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,544,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Rumer Godden was one of the UK's most distinguished authors. She wrote many well-known and much-loved books for both adults and children, including The Story of Holly and Ivy and The Dolls' House. Her children's novel, The Diddakoi, won the Whitbread Children's Book Award in 1972. She was awarded the OBE in 1993 and died in 1998, aged ninety. Gary Blythe is a successful illustrator best-known for The Whale Song , which won the prestigious Kate Greenaway Award, and I Believe in Unicorns by Michael Morpurgo. He lives in Merseyside.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 30 customer reviews
I recommend it for kids and grownups.
Dorothy Johnson
In fact, I'm a fan of all of Godden's works, from her children's books to her adult titles such as Black Narcissus.
Jodi
The ending is realistic, happy, and even surprising as a good deed brings an unexpected reward.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Dragon Lady on March 8, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As "Harry Potter" calls out to today's young bright outsiders looking for somewhere to truly belong, this book spoke to me. It mesmerised me as a little girl. As an USAF "brat" I very much understand Nona's ache and anger as the "weird" outsider. I fell in love with the dolls as well. Their "voices" sounded like two little doting "aunties" as they subtly manipulated Nona and Belinda into seeing past their differences and fears and into finding friendship. If only I had had such a wonderful pair of guardian angels of my own back then.

Rumer does a great job of painting two total opposites of little girls with warmth and sympathy while never truly turning either into either a villian or a bad joke (way too rare). She showed that even our flaws can become strengths when they are accepted and we are willing to be loved.

One thing that really grabbed me as a child was that the book included all the plans for the house and the furnishings the girls eventually build for their little foriegn guests. I spent hours pouring over the school library copy back then. I nearly wore it out. Now my girls will be able to indulge in the same pleasure without having to always be on the look out for the due date.

This time we'll be building the Japanese doll house together.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is still one of my favorites. I read it when I was 10 years old and in 5th grade. I fell in love with the idea of creating a home for my dolls, so I begged my dad to build me the same dollhouse, which he did. I spent many weeks searching for items to put in it, but I had some trouble finding things that looked Japanese. This book inspired me to learn more about other cultures and languages. I still have the dollhouse, and am planning to refurbish it this summer. I bought a copy of the book about 18 years ago, but it was very hard to find. I'm glad that it is more easily avaiable today. This would be a fun book to read with a child, and the house would be a fun project to make together.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Blum on July 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
I loved this book as a child, even using the plans to make a dollshouse of my own (albeit out of cardboard). Unfortunately the new paperback lacks the delicate illustrations gracing my cherished edition (circa late 1960s?). Hope that future versions will oblige.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Van Daviss on September 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Miss Happiness and Miss Flower was one of my very favorite books as a child, and the original edition rates five stars plus. I spent hours imagining building a Japanese dollshouse, and actually making some of the things Nona makes for her dolls. The paperback edition pictured, alas, deserves only four stars, because it leaves out a crucially important and wonderful part of the original book: the plans and instructions to build a Japanese dollshouse like the one built in the story. It is a perfectly delightful story, but part of what made the book so wonderful was the inclusion of the plans. I bought the paperback to give to my great-nieces, but I will now try to find them an edition that includes the house plans.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jodi on January 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
One of the most prized "childhood favourites" in my library along with Little Plum, the follow-up novel to Miss Happiness and Miss Flower. In fact, I'm a fan of all of Godden's works, from her children's books to her adult titles such as Black Narcissus.
I "discovered" Miss Happiness and Miss Flower a couple of years after my family relocated from tropical Queensland - with its memories of mangoes, mosquito nets and frangipani (plumaria) flowers - to Sydney, a temperate climate city with cold winters.
In those days (mid-1960s)when families and cultures migrated a lot less than they do now, migrants from even just another state - let alone another country! - felt homesick and alienated. But even today in the age of the internet, transplanted girls still miss their old home, its sights, sounds, tastes and friends...and would enjoy this gentle book.
Naturally, I related to the novel's heroine Nona, a book-loving young girl uprooted from her home in tropical India and sent to live in England. I also connected to the empathy she develops with Miss Happiness and Miss Flower, two Japanese dolls who are also feeling out of place and homesick for the familiar.
Fortunately I didn't have a selfish (and insecure) cousin Belinda - as Nona does - to make my life even more miserable. But like Nona, I did eventually make friends and begin to feel at home...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
Miss Happiness and Miss Flower.
This book is about a girl named Nona who comes from India to live with her aunt and uncle. Her cousins' names are Tom, Anne, and Belinda. She is very unhappy and lonely until two dolls arrive called Miss Happiness and Miss Flower. There was supposed to be a doll called Little Peach in the box too but he was not there. This really disappoints Belinda. When they arrive the whole family gets involved in making a Japanese doll's house. The kids get help from Mr. Twilfit who runs the bookstore who gives them book about Japan. Tom does all the building. Nona reads about Japan and their festivals and houses. Melly, a friend Nona meets at school and her mom help too. Anne sews the dolls' clothes. Everyone pitches in except Belinda. She is mean and spiteful because she feels jealous of all the attention that Nona is getting.
All through the story the reader wonders if Belinda will ruin the dolls' house. She also refuses to let Miss Flower live in the Japanese house.
Nona decides to write her aunt and ask for the Little Peach. When he arrives they have peaches for breakfast and Belinda is happy because Little Peach is inside her fruit. All ends happily because Nona likes her new school and family.
I would recommend this book because it is a little different and a sweet story about a family coming together.
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