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4.4 out of 5 stars
Miss Invisible
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
Freddie is a just your regular almost 30 something woman, who has a job she enjoys, with a boss she hates, trying to find that special guy. Oh and she's also on the bigger side which ironically makes her easy to miss. She's learned to blend in the crowd, pleasing society by eating carrot sticks in public and then going home and downing a pint of ice cream. She's learned to keep her anger inside and stay hidden. Then she meets Deborah, a caterer who gets Freddie to release her true self and become a new person. Once Freddie finds her voice, her life changes- for the better.

Oh I loved loved LOVED this book! The story is excellent, the characters are great, there's so much food in the book! I could really relate to Freddie. I'm not a big girl, but neither am I a size 6 either. I felt the same way she does about how smaller girls always get the attention from society and everyone else gets ignored. And I was really glad that Freddie showed realistic reactions to those girls that wear low cut jeans and belly baring shirts. I loved that there is a character named Deborah in this book. Usually when I read a book where there is a character that shares my name she usually gets it shorten down to Debbie (ugh). Not so here, and what an awesome character Deborah was. I wish I had a friend like her in my life. I really felt for Freddie when her father kept insulting her throughout her life. It really hurt during the party when he did it to her face right in front of everyone. I'm glad that the author did not feel that this book needed to have a tidied ending where Freddie and her father magically get along. I would not have believed it if it was written that way, it would have been completely unrealistic. I just loved how real this book is. Christians do tend to be prejudiced in regards to appearance no matter what they say.

I really loved this book. And I totally did not feel guilty about eating ice cream while reading it either! This is one of the best chick lit books I have ever read, Christian or secular. This is a perfect book to pass along to non Christian readers as well, it's not preachy at all, just a fun good read. If you haven't read any of Laura Jensen Walker's other books, I highly recommend reading those as well. I know I'll be anxiously awaiting her next one!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
This book was like a heartfelt cheering section
for EVERYONE who feels invisible, unaccepted, and is struggling to find who
God made them to be.

Although my "issues" may be different than Freddie's, the author created a character I could completely identify with. I was delighted and inspired by taking this journey of risk, change, and growth with Freddie and her friends.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
I have so enjoyed each Walker book, but I consider Miss Invisible a cut above the rest. The writing is seamless and fun. A great example of "big-girl" chic-lit or would that be "chunk-lit?" The almost thirty Fredricka 'Freddie' is plagued by other important issues including: a history of abuse from her father and stepmother who always found fault in Freddie, harassment from her boss, being ignored everywhere she goes, and a rocky love-life 'at best'. In fact, call it a non-existent love-life. But Freddie's wit and resilience shine through in spite of her lack of self-worth. When God puts Deborah into her path, Freddie's world begins to change. For the better!

The writing was so good, the story so compelling, the setting so enticing, the characters so unique and real, and the situations so gripping...I could not put it down. I carried it with me everywhere, hoping I'd need to wait for roadwork or at the Dr.'s office. It was THAT good. Loved it!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 24, 2007
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Having just read Laura Jensen Walker's 'Deconstructing Natalie' and loving it and having previously enjoyed her Phoebe Grant duo I admit I came to this book with high expectations.

Freddie is an overweight, single, cake decorator from somewhere in California with an overbearing father, a heinous boss and some solid friends.

There were parts in this book that were laugh out loud funny and parts that seemed a bit 'done' e.g. the whole heroine venting her angst in a blog that takes off plotline has already been seen in numerous other Christian chick lits novels such as Considering Lily and The Cublice Next Door and is just getting a bit old.

Freddie is likeable and quirky and human. There is a strong supporting cast though at some points there seemed to be a few subplots that could have used a bit more fleshing out to make them really interesting.

Miss Invisible is a good read that, though it didn't leave me desperate for more, made me feel that my money was well spent.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on May 14, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I really think that these Christian lit books should disclose this lean in the story to purchasers. I've been duped a few times and I hate it. I consider it false advertising and am going to return my purchases because of it.. I'm in two book groups and we all agree. If a book has crime or sex or witchcraft in it, the jacket let's you know. This christian literature (unless it's those Amish stories) always masks as a great contemporary chick lit story and never mentions that scripture will be tossed at you all the time. Yuck. Hate it, hate the dishonesty, hate feeling tricked out of my money. Be honest. It's not nice to fool people. I'm sure there is something in scripture about not tricking people.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
Every woman on this planet has struggled with weight and body image issues at some time in their life, and Laura Jensen Walker's books are always fantastic. So I knew before I opened the cover that Freddie Heinz's story in Miss Invisible would speak to my heart.

What surprised me about this story was the subplot I didn't expect: Freddie also battles wounds inflicted by an abusive, dysfunctional family.

Her father is an angry man with a guilty past. He takes his guilt and self-loathing out on Freddie through regular doses of verbal abuse--the sort of abuse that would turn the strongest, brightest spirit into a wallflower.

And that's where this book goes from good to great.

Freddie is, in the truest sense of the word, a conqueror. Through the help of a vibrant friend, Freddie begins to see that all the horrible labels slapped on her by her family are not permanent.

She doesn't have to let them stick. She can peel them off. She can be proud of the woman God created her to be.

As you turn the pages of this book, and see the sparkle return to Freddie's eyes, you feel a sparkle come to life in your own heart too.

We all labor under the weight of past labels, wounds, and insecurities. Whether emotional or physical, these things take a toll on our courage and our hope.

But Freddie's story reminds us that we don't have to be handicapped forever by the perspectives of others. There is joy and freedom in being proud of how God made us, and in choosing to believe we have value that extends beyond the opinions of our critics.

Another solid triumph of a book by Laura Jensen Walker. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
In her newest novel Laura Jensen Walker tackles issues such as self-esteem and plus-size status. Walker is the author of four other novels, including Reconstructing Natalie, Women of Faith's Novel of the Year for 2006.

Here meet Freddie Heinz: professional baker, wedding cake decorator, overweight and completely invisible. At work she is bullied by her boss. At church, her "crush" can't seem to remember her name. And her personal life is non-existent.

However, when Freddie makes a new friend, Deborah, her life begins to change. Freddie is inspired by this larger-than-life woman who makes big look beautiful. Deborah encourages Freddie to love herself just as she is.

As Freddie begins to build confidence, a certain veterinarian begins to take notice. Then she meets a cute guy during their singles group. Freddie goes from Miss Invisible to a blossoming flower - and she loves her new life. As she gains confidence, you just never know what might happen.

This book was an inspiration to me. As do most women, I struggle with self-esteem at times and I loved that Freddie learned to love herself just as she is. She didn't lose 60 pounds and become a supermodel. She didn't have an Extreme Makeover, at least not on the outside. And yet, at the end of the book you can tell what a different person, a better person, she has become.

[...]
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
Freddy is a little over weight. So what. As women, I feel we can all identify with her, feel for her, and love her. I am attracted to Walker's books, because the so-called-underdog triumphs in the end, grows stronger, and develops as an interesting character.

Freddy is quite anxious about her curves. In fact, her lack of convidence is placing boundaries in her life and controlling her inner tigress. But the people she meets along the way help her to see herself, extra pounds and all, as an asset and gift from God.

When Freddy begins to see herself as more than a big-boned-woman, she also begins to develop substance, depth, and a sense of security. Then...two men are attracted to her Colorfullness and Humor, too.

Isn't that how it goes? When one is not looking for a man, they suddenly have a line at their door!

This book is one long hug after hug after hug. But what we realize in the end...is that we are hugging ourselves.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
When I read the first chapter of Miss Invisible I almost put it down because the feelings Freddy was experiencing were too real and painful for me. But...I decided to keep reading and I am so glad it did. I really enjoyed the journey with Freddy. I loved the way her friend Deborah brought so much love and healing into her life. She was like Jesus with skin on to Freddy.

Reading Miss Invisible allowed me to look at some of the issues behide my food cravings and process that a little more. So it was helpful as well as entertaining. I also loved Laura's other fiction books: Reconstructing Natalie, Dreaming in Black and White, and Technicolor. So glad someone is writing about real issues!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
I really wanted to like this book after reading a description and the reviews of it but after reading the first few chapters I found I did not like it at all. The book is riddled with cliches and steroptypes. It did not sit right with me when I read the main character proclaim that "black fat is better than white fat." Oh yeah? Why is that? The African American female character in the book that the main character seemed to look up to so much seemed like a sterotype or charicature of an African American woman. I mean I am happy to see a character that is larger and is confident and proud of her body, but that does not automatically mean that all African American larger women are, an idea the book seemed to promote. And there are many who do not share the feeling that "black fat looks better than white fat." And believe me, contrary to the main character's feelings, not all black men prefer larger women. These issues aside the book just did not feel sincere and I am sorry to say I did not enjoy it.
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