Missiles

January 5, 2011 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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4:25
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11:20

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 5, 2011
  • Release Date: January 5, 2011
  • Label: Dangerbird Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2008 Dangerbird Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 58:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004GB0GCQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #334,463 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joseph R. Lacombe on October 28, 2008
Format: Audio CD
There have been some mixed reviews going around in regards to The Dears' fourth LP, "Missiles". I say "some" because truly there aren't many reviews of it at all. In fact, I am only the third review on Amazon.com about the album and it has been out now for a week (or probably more by the time the review is published). That is not to say that The Dears are not a worthy or awe-inspiring musical experience by any means, but are perhaps simply underrated.

That being said, I must say that this album is simply heart-wrenching. I had been anticipating it since 2006, when the band released "Gang of Losers", which left much to be desired on my end. However, I feel that "Gang of Losers" was absolutely necessary to achieve "Missiles'" intriguing sound.

I would move through the track listing and systematically describe each one, but I feel that would be a waste of your time. Rather, I truly, truly recommend that you give it your own listen. It is quite a diverse album. The songs range from the strange intimacy of "Missiles" to the orchestral, mellotron-laden "Lights Off" (which, by the way, contains one of the most soulful guitar solos I've heard in years). "Crisis 1 & 2" is under 4 minutes, but is very catchy and driving. Natalia Yamchek sings sans-Lightburn for the first half of the song, then delivers up the second half to him, literally splitting it into parts 1 and 2. The album finishes with two overwhelmingly beautiful pieces, "Meltdown in A Major" and "Saviour." The first stands out as a shining, moving masterpiece from which I took the title of my review. I find it hard to choke back tears at every listen. The latter is a full-bodied and epic confession, with Murray Lightburn pleading, "I am a sinner / Ain't no beginner / But I'm paid up in full.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Manny Hernandez HALL OF FAME on October 27, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Murray Lightburn and Natalia Yanchak are the only two members of The Dears to continue carrrying the flag of the band on this album by the Canadian indie outfit. And somehow it feels that they are in transition: though Lightburn's passion shines through every single track, though it's the same Dears we learned to get addicted to in No Cities Left and Gang of Losers, their two best albums, it's still not quite at the same point as these two albums.

If I take tracks like "Disclaimer," "Savior" and "Meltdown in A Major," I can totally say it's still there: The Dears are alive and well. It's just some of the power of their previous work that needs to come back... or maybe this is just their way into their new sound. Because of this, I cannot give them five stars.

Having said that, this is SO FAR BETTER than most of the music you can listen to these days that four stars sounds like an accurate assessment of "Missiles." Oddly enough, though not their best album to date, it makes me feel happy... they are still with us.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cale E. Reneau on October 21, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Since The Dears first released No Cities Left in 2003, I've consistently had the band filed under "Favorite Bands" in my mind. Murray Lightburn and the musicians that surround him have been a reliable source of quality music for as long as I can remember. Whether it was "22: Death of All the Romance" or "Ballad of Humankindness" (my #1 song of 2006), The Dears have always managed to strike a chord with me (no pun intended), tugging on my emotions and forcing me to ask myself difficult questions about life, society, and the nature of people.

Missiles - an album marked by tensions within the group that ultimately found all but two of their members departing - continues to examine these deep themes rarely poked at in today's music. However, while the music continues to traverse this path, it rarely packs the punch of the band's earlier work. The band's previous two album have been marked by slow-building movements that eventually erupt with emotion. On Missiles, songs die with a whimper, often ending unemphatically or even worse, fading out entirely.

Missiles is also plagued with songs that go on for entirely too long. Album-opener, "Disclaimer," takes nearly 7 minutes off of the clock before finally deciding to call it quits. During that time, the listener is forced to listen to a completely uninteresting and possibly juvenile vocal melody and harmonies that sound just a little bit off. By the time it's all over, most will find themselves asking what the point of it all was. The album doesn't end any better either, with the 11-minute "Saviour" being more of a lesson in tedium rather than an actual attempt at making emotionally gratifying art.
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By J. Leard on December 10, 2010
Format: Audio CD
My introduction to The Dears was 2006's "Gang of Losers", a tremendous work of angst, sorrow, and passion. While "Missiles" is certainly still the same band, the passion and verve of "Whites Only Party" is nowhere to be found. Instead, "Missiles" is a deliberate work marked more by emotional restraint and tight arrangement spread out over lengthy tracks. This isn't the same punchy group of songs the band brought forward before. Lightburn repeats lyrics more, there is less singing overall, and the music does much more of the heavy lifting on its own. "Lights Off", with its repeated refrain of "through the back of the head", drives home the single-minded focus of what Lightburn does choose to say, and what he doesn't is brought forward in the spastic, sorrowful guitar solo that anchors the song's second half.

This isn't an album that grabs you immediately, but rather one that slowly but surely digs its claws in. And like so few albums anymore, it asks to be listened to straight through, from front to back. This is how it delivers its message of paranoia and stress and mania, how the repeated refrains and patient melodies and structure. The album closes with "Savior", an 11-minute monster that never feels formulaic or drawn-out; it just is what it is. It works, and it serves as a fitting coda to an album that, via "Crisis 1 & 2", asks one simple question as it takes measured paces through the audio landscape that Lightburn creates: "I'm dying to know how much you care."
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