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Mister Monday (Keys to the Kingdom, Book 1) Mass Market Paperback – July 1, 2003


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Frequently Bought Together

Mister Monday (Keys to the Kingdom, Book 1) + Grim Tuesday (Keys to the Kingdom, Book 2) + Sir Thursday (Keys to the Kingdom, Book 4)
Price for all three: $19.59

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 800L (What's this?)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks; Reissue edition (July 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439551234
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439551236
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (168 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #299,432 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8-Arthur Penhaligon's school year is not off to a good start. On his first day, he suffers an asthma attack while running cross country and dreams that a mysterious figure hands him a key shaped like the minute hand of a clock. However, when he wakes up, he still has the key. That's when strange things begin to happen. Mister Monday dispatches terrifying, dog-faced Fetchers to retrieve it, a bizarre sleeping illness sweeps the city, and only Arthur can see the weird new house that appears in his neighborhood. The seventh grader knows it all has something to do with the key, one of seven elusive fragments of the Will to which he has become heir apparent, and a mysterious atlas. When he ventures inside the house, he meets more strange characters than he could have imagined, none of whom are what they seem. And, of course, he must battle Monday, who will do anything to get the key back. With the help of the key, Arthur must fight his way out. The first in a seven part series for middle graders is every bit as exciting and suspenseful as the author's previous young adult novels. Readers will eagerly anticipate the sequels.
Ginny Collier, Dekalb County Public Library, Chamblee, GA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Voice of Youth Advocates
(February 1, 2004; 0-439-55123-4)

Arthur Penhaligon's first day at a new school is marked by a nearly fatal asthma attack. In fact, the attack should have been fatal, but a key shaped like the minute hand of a clock that somehow helps him to breathe saves Arthur. Shortly after, strange-looking people pursue Arthur as a mysterious plague breaks out. As Arthur enters a huge house that only he can see, searching for a cure for this plague and for the mysterious Mister Monday, the adventure is launched. Nix's creativity spills over in the fast-paced engrossing plot. The House is a massive universe populated by Ink Fillers, giants, eerie and evil mechanical creatures, the robot-like Commissionaires, and Mister Monday's attendants, Dawn, Noon, and Dusk. The characters are interesting and complicated, particularly those in the House; Arthur is never sure whom he can trust, and the various quirks will keep readers guessing. Arthur seems a bit aloof at times or else impatient with his task, but he is clever, resourceful, and resilient, and he truly proves his heroism. The opening prologue is a bit on the obscure side, but encourage any dubious readers to get beyond it because this novel is a fresh, original start to an exciting new fantasy series.-Donna Scanlon.


School Library Journal
(December 1, 2003; 0-439-55123-4)

Gr 5-8-Arthur Penhaligon's school year is not off to a good start. On his first day, he suffers an asthma attack while running cross country and dreams that a mysterious figure hands him a key shaped like the minute hand of a clock. However, when he wakes up, he still has the key. That's when strange things begin to happen. Mister Monday dispatches terrifying, dog-faced Fetchers to retrieve it, a bizarre sleeping illness sweeps the city, and only Arthur can see the weird new house that appears in his neighborhood. The seventh grader knows it all has something to do with the key, one of seven elusive fragments of the Will to which he has become heir apparent, and a mysterious atlas. When he ventures inside the house, he meets more strange characters than he could have imagined, none of whom are what they seem. And, of course, he must battle Monday, who will do anything to get the key back. With the help of the key, Arthur must fight his way out. The first in a seven part series for middle graders is every bit as exciting and suspenseful as the author's previous young adult novels. Readers will eagerly anticipate the sequels.-Ginny Collier, Dekalb County Public Library, Chamblee, GA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Publishers Weekly
starred (July 28, 2003; 0-439-55123-4)

In this first volume in Nix's (Sabriel) Mister Monday series, magic splashes across virtually every page. First, a brief, cryptic prelude tells of "the Will" that has been kept under cosmic lock-and-key by generations of Inspectors and their robotic sentries. Next, readers meet seventh-grader Arthur Penhaligon, an asthmatic adoptee who is struggling to fit in at his new school. Nix quickly thrusts Arthur into the heart of the mystery: while recovering from an asthma attack during gym class, Arthur is given a mysterious Key and Atlas from Mister Monday, an ominous wheelchair-bound man (mentioned in the prelude). The Key resembles the minute hand of a clock, and is actually a powerful talisman, tied to the clock-like device that guards the Will. Before long, Fetchers, strange dog-faced creatures, attempt to recover the key, and unleash a disease upon humans that threatens massive casualties. Arthur sets out to stop the Fetchers at the source, and ends up exploring a cavernous house visible only to him (it's 4,000 stories high, a girl inside tells him). Here the surreal story becomes even more puzzle-like and visually ornate-a sort of amalgam of Alice in Wonderland and The Phantom Tollbooth. Nix's grand explan

More About the Author

Garth Nix has worked as a bookseller, book sales representative, publicist, editor, marketing consultant and literary agent. He also spent five years as a part-time soldier in the Australian Army Reserve. A full-time writer since 2001, more than five million copies of his books have been sold around the world and his work has been translated into 40 languages. Garth's books have appeared on the bestseller lists of The New York Times, Publishers Weekly (US), The Bookseller(UK), The Australian and The Sunday Times (UK). He lives in Sydney, Australia, with his wife and two children.

Customer Reviews

Written for young adults this is a book that can be enjoyed by anyone who loves a good fantasy story.
K. Maxwell
Overall the story is amazing, Garth Nix is really an incredibly imaginative author and everything he writes is always a great story.
Rodrigo Calvo Leon
This is one of the best books I've read in a long time and I read all seven books in the series without stopping!
Liaslia Harbringer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 3, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Dark fantasy writer Garth Nix expanded his readership with his excellent "Seventh Tower" series. Now he expands further, in a darker, grittier, more realistic fantasy set in our world, where a confused young boy has to escape dark forces that want to use him for their own ends -- or kill him.
Arthur Penhaligon has asthma. As a result, he ends up in the hospital regularly. But one day he encounters a strange man called Mr. Monday and his creepy butler, who leave him with a Key shaped like a minute hand and a little book with dancing letters. When he returns home after another stay in the hospital, Arthur finds that the Key seems to be attracting unwanted attention -- a statue of a Komodo dragon comes alive, and a winged man-dog tries to come into his house. What's more, a House has appeared -- one that is also inside the little book.
Soon Arthur is being pursued by more dog-faced Fetchers, and a strange plague is sweeping his town -- and somehow the Key is keeping him alive, even though he was supposed to die of an asthma attack. His answers lie inside the House. But what lies beyond it is like nothing in our world, where ghastly nithlings roam and the Piper's children run wild in the streets. And the sinister Mr. Monday wants the Key back.
Garth Nix takes his focus from high fantasy (such as the Abhorsen trilogy or the Seventh Tower series) to a more modern fantasy that takes place in our world. Though Arthur skips to another world, he's clearly from our own world. But Nix doesn't downplay his brand of horrific fantasy either; stuff that would seem silly for most other authors is magic in his hands.
As in his other books, he melds an exceptional, original fantasy world with elements of horror.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Silmarwen VINE VOICE on August 19, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Arthur Penhaligon dreaded his first day at his new school. His family had just moved to the area and he was starting two weeks later than everyone else because he was in the hospital with a severe asthma attack. His PE teacher thought he was just slacking off when Arthur told him that he couldn't run so Arthur thought it was best to just go with the flow and joined the other kids. Arthur knew it was a mistake when he felt his lungs start to shut down in the middle of the park - far away from help. Not even his inhaler seemed to be giving him oxygen. When he saw a cadaverously thin man with terrible teeth pushing the most beautiful man Arthur had ever seen in an old fashioned wicker wheelchair, Arthur was sure that he was having a weird, oxygen-deprived dream. Then the beautiful man gave Arthur a key and he could breathe again. After Arthur recovered from his asthma attack, he discovered that the key was actually the key to a clock and that it came with a book, the Compleat Atlas of the House and Immediate Environs, which shows pictures of how to use the key to get into a big house on the block that only Arthur can see.
Arthur doesn't know what to do, but he knows that he cannot stay at school when an army of dog-faced Fetchers show up to get the key from him. Even more frightening than the Fetchers is Mr. Noon, who is just as beautiful as the man who gave him the key, and just as deadly. When a deadly virus strikes Arthur's new town, he knows that he has no choice but to go into the House. When he passes through the gateway, Arthur is immediately plunged into a strange world where people collect paper and writing and the children the Pied Piper lured off are trapped.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By T. Cameron on July 3, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I think Keys to the Kingdom is my new favorite series by Mr. Nix. Once again, he has created a deep, detailed and believable world that leaves readers hungry for the next book. The story of Mister Monday begins in the normal world, where Arthur is starting his first term at his new private school. During a PE endurance run, his asthma leaves him gasping for breath, and he collapses. Just when he's about to pass out, he meets two strange men, who give him a small book and a key shaped like the minute hand of a clock. Once Arthur touches the key, his asthma attack suddenly stops as if it had never started. The two men begin to fight, and then they vanish, leaving a confused Arthur with the book and key, wondering if he had been seeing things. Things escalate from there, and as Arthur realizes the extent of the key's powers, he finds that lots of intruders from the House, another world, would be willing to kill to get it. Left with no other options after a mysterious plague sweeps his town following an attack by intruders, Arthur travels to the House to unravel the mystery of the key and the book. It's really amazing how, over and over again, Nix can imagine new, perfectly functional, interesting societies, with suspenseful and enthralling plots to match. I think Mister Monday is a great book for people of all ages, not just for teens and young adults.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 5, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Now, I had read all of the Seventh Tower Books before this book came out, so I knew that Garth Nix was a good author. I saw the book and said " Hey, Cool, He wrote a new book!" This book was excellent, and brilliantly written. I would give it 30 thumbs up if I could! This book starts off with the main character, Arthur, going to a new school. on his first day of school, he is surprised by a mandatory run. He tries to jog and run for a while, but he is azhmatic and faints whle he is running. Then, a mysteriuos man called mister Monday gives him a key, with the thought that he would die any second. But the key altered his "record" and he lived, to the surprise of Mister Monday. That is where the adventure begins. That's all I'm going to say for now, but this is an awesome book, and its worth more than what they sell it for. I hope this review helps in your decision.
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