Mistwood and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$8.01
Qty:1
  • List Price: $8.99
  • Save: $0.98 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mistwood Paperback – April 26, 2011


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, April 26, 2011
$8.01
$1.74 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Mistwood + Nightspell
Price for both: $11.61

Buy the selected items together
  • Nightspell $3.60

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Greenwillow Books; Reprint edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061957011
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061957017
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,040,354 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up—For centuries, the kings of Samorna have depended upon the immortal Shifter for protection. When the Crown Prince Rokan ventures into the Mistwood to find the Shifter, she again allows herself to be caught, to be tamed, and to be tangled into the deception and danger of the human court. The Shifter is uneasy, though. First she woke with no distinct memory of the past and now she finds that she is unable to change shape. As she adapts to palace life and painstakingly hides her inability to embrace her past abilities fully, she seems to become more the Lady Isabel as she is known in court, unwittingly displaying human emotions and hesitating in her bound duties to the crown. As Rokan becomes king, he is thrust into danger, seemingly from all sides. Isabel learns much more than she bargained for as she hunts among courtiers for conspirators and finds her loyalties divided. This story unfolds gracefully, mirroring the slow path Isabel must travel to begin understanding herself and her place in the world. Her journey in self-acceptance takes place within a country in turmoil. Fans of Megan Whalen Turner's "Attolia" books (HarperCollins) will be drawn to similar hidden political currents within the court, and fans of Kristin Cashore's Graceling (Harcourt, 2008) will wholeheartedly embrace Isabel as a reluctant warrior heroine treading in unfamiliar waters of the heart. An excellent addition for all collections with a strong fantasy following.—Jessica Miller, New Britain Public Library, CT
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“The greatest magic is the power of choice in this lush, romantic debut fantasy. . . . Astonishing and inspiring.” (Kirkus Reviews (starred review))

“Fans of Megan Whalen Turner’s ‘Attolia’ books will be drawn to similar hidden political currents within the court, and fans of Kristin Cashore’s Graceling will wholeheartedly embrace Isabel as a reluctant warrior heroine treading in unfamiliar waters of the heart. (School Library Journal)

“An unusual, suspenseful fantasy that is propelled by well-placed clues.” (ALA Booklist)

“A fascinating tale of loyalty and love that female teen readers will devour.” (Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA))

More About the Author

Leah Cypess wrote her first story in first grade. The narrator was an ice-cream cone in the process of being eaten. In fourth grade, she wrote her first book, about a girl who was shipwrecked on a desert island with her faithful and heroic dog (a rip-off of both The Black Stallion and all the Lassie movies).

After selling her first story while in high school, she gave in to her mother's importuning to be practical and majored in biology at Brooklyn College. She then went to Columbia Law School and practiced law for almost two years. She kept writing and submitting in her spare time, and finally, a mere 15 years after her first short story acceptance, she sold her first novel.

Leah currently lives in Brookline, Massachusetts with her husband and children.

Customer Reviews

Well done Ms. Cypess, and write on!
A. Grey
The book is a lot about mind games and it was well developed, but I felt like the plot was stalling at some point and found myself craving for more action.
Tynga's Reviews
I pretty much liked them all, even the bad, evil ones.
Stacy Wells

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Angela Thompson VINE VOICE on May 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover
MISTWOOD has been on my radar for close to a year now, if you can believe it. I've been monitoring its status updates on Amazon and GoodReads and checking Leah Cypess' site regularly for any news. There have been tantalizingly few details about this book floating around the verse. I knew it was YA fantasy. I knew it was about a girl who was a shifter. And I knew it took place in a kingdom in trouble. The back cover copy proclaims it, "For fans of Kristin Cashore's Graceling and Fire, Tamora Pierce, and Megan Whalen Turner's Attolia books." Ahem. That combination right there is only like the holy triumvirate of YA fantasy awesome. And so it was with unmitigated glee that I started reading it the night it arrived.

She has no memory. No concept of an existence before the moment they came riding into the Mistwood to drag her back to a castle full of high walls, dark secrets, and the suffocating need of the prince. They call her Isabel. The Shifter. The mythical being who can take any form at a moment's notice, who is faster and stronger than any human, whose entire reason for existing is to protect the rulers of Samorna. From harm. From death. With her own life if necessary. And though she answers the insistent pull to protect Prince Rokan, Isabel cannot reconcile who she might be and what she might have been with who they expect her to be. Set apart by her uncertain status and the legend of her origins, she struggles to harness her abilities and come to grips with human emotions and motivations. Amid a swirl of court politics, scheming factions, and doubtful loyalties, the Shifter must race against time to save the man who would be king. A man she is bound to. A man she distrusts. A man she has come to call her friend.

First things first. The cover copy does not lie.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Monster Of Books on July 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This review is going to, probably, sound mostly negative. But I do not want to give the wrong impression to people reading this review. I did enjoy this novel, quite a lot. I couldn't stop reading it, and when I wasn't reading it I was thinking about it. This book was fast pace, and enjoyable. But in the end, I came to conclusion of giving it three stars. Now onto the review!!

Something in Mistwood that bothered me, was Isabel (protagonist) knew things that were never mentioned before. The best way to describe this is, there are scenes were she'll just randomly start thinking about someone (or talking). She'll say there name and all about them, and as a reader your thinking: when did she meet this person. I felt this story biggest problem was the timing. It was rushed way to much, to the point where I was getting confused.

Now for anyone who hasn't read this novel, Isabel comes to this castle as a shapeshifter. But she has no previous memory of her life. Now I believe that this rush in the story, made me feel that her loss of memory was unbelievable. I think that if the story weren't so fast paced, and spent more time going through the days when the main character first got there then it would be a bit more realistic.

The characters were all strongly built, my favorite being Rokan and his sister Clarisse. Even though the story is told in third person, which by the way was magnificently done, Isabel was the character you as a reader felt more in touch with. At first I found her character development quite slow, and really saw none. I really didn't notice any change in her until the very end, and somehow that worked out really well. Especially with the romance element, which is very distant in the novel. It's obvious, but you don't really feel it until mid way through.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Darcy Wishard on May 10, 2010
Format: Hardcover
In the spirit of books like Graceling and Fire by Kristin Cashore it is always a bonus when the main character in a book is a strong female lead who is portrayed as smart and powerful. Isabel is all of the above, but for reasons unknown vulnerability and humanity seep through her mask of stoic indifference as the inhuman Shifter.

Isabel knows that everything she feels towards Prince Rokan should be instinct and bonds formed long before he was born. Something is different...her feelings for him feel almost human but this can't be...this is not the way of the Shifter. With the help of an uncharacteristically friendly sorcerer, Isabel researches her past to try and understand what happened and why she is feeling so "different". Why does she have such a hard time shifting outside her forest? Why can't she remember why she fled the castle so many years ago?

Things get even more complicated when Isabel learns the truth and finds out what Prince Rokan has been hiding from her. Lines are drawn and sides are taken, but you'll have a hard time figuring out who is on what side....there are plenty of betrayals and double-agents to keep you guessing!

The truth about Isabel's past is a real shocker and something I did not see coming. Great writing and an original story will make this a sure hit among teens and young adults!

Appropriate for ages 12 and up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rhiannon Star on March 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover
The cover of this book is what immediately drew me to this book. I found it fascinating, and as soon as I read the description, I knew that I had to read it. You find very few good books where the protagonist is a shapeshifter. While books tend to go more for vampires and werewolves these days, I on the other hand have become intrigued by shifters. I was highly anticipating this book. When I finally got to read it, I was sorely disappointed.

*SPOILERS AHEAD*

I had several problems with the book. One of the main ones was that there was virtually no chemistry between Isabel and Rokan. Then suddenly at the end, he declares his love for her. You see Isabel's inner turmoil with her human emotions and the shifter's duty to the royal family. I never really saw anything from Rokan that hinted his feelings for her. Although, you knew that they would end up with each other. I felt there was more chemistry with Ven, then I did with Rokan.

Another problem was that Isabel had trouble with her abilities when she was in the castle, but when she would run away and go to her woods, she could shift easily. I know that it was because of who she truly was, but I was hoping for more, since the story was about a Shape shifter. I didn't like how she could use some abilities so easily but the ones you really wanted her to, she could never use.

The ending was another for me. That she was the princess of the previous king, who Rokan's father usurped. That the Shifter entered her body and basically took it over to protect her. Isabel rides back into the wood right after Rokan tells her he loves her, then she and the shifter part. She becomes completely human. And then rides back to the castle to return to Rokan.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?