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Miwok in Yosemite: Southern Miwok Life, History, and Language in the Yosemite Region Pamphlet – 1996


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Product Details

  • Pamphlet: 26 pages
  • Publisher: Yosemite Association (1996)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0027NUXAU
  • Average Customer Review: 1.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Interested in REAL History on September 25, 2005
Format: Unknown Binding
Craig Bates states that he got most of his information from a Howard, who was a Yosemite Miwok. The Howards were the descendents of Chief Bautista AKA Vowchester who was not a Yosemite Indian, but who was afraid of Chief Tenaya and the Ahwhanees. He and Chief Russio were the ones who coined the term "Yosemite" which means "Grizzly bear" or "Killer" and -mite "person". They also told Savage they were afraid of the Yosemites and would not enter Yosemite Valley because they feared the Ahwahnees.

The cover shows a photo of Chris Brown AKA Lemee who stated that he was the last of the Nutchus (Noot-choos). Which were also not Yosemite Indians but signers of the treaties and foothill Indians. In fact the Nutchus hunted down Chief Tenaya for Savage.

I agee with the first reviewer. The only ax to grind is that it is not right to buy books that distort the real history of Yosemite.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Yosemite Native Americans on June 18, 2006
Format: Unknown Binding
I was looking through the book and it is really faulty. No disrespect to the elder in the back of the book, but she was from Chief Bautista's family. Chief Bautista was the chief of the Potoyantes. Bautista went by other names Keechee, Vow-ches-ter, Vow-chester, Bautista and then later by the last name Howard. Bautista was the one who actually helped James Savage and the Mariposa Battalion. He was the first to sign the Fremont Treaty of March 1851. He would capture run-a-ways who wanted to escape toiling in Major James Savage's gold mines. He was quoted as saying that HE AND HIS PEOPLE NEVER ENTERED YOSEMITE. That they were afraid to venture in there because of the "Yosemites" which in his language meant "The Killers". He also said they feared Yosemite Valley because there were witches there. In the Stockton Alta California dated 1851 Bautista referred to the Yosemite Indians as "Monahs" (Mono Paiutes). When the Battalion entered Yosemite they never found a roundhouse, that was built in later. There was never one there in historic times. The majority of the Indian people in the book are Paiutes, not Miwoks. Giving the reader a false impression that the early people of Yosemite were Miwoks, when they were not. What the Battalion did find in Yosemite were Mono Paiutes and a Paiute camp with items that only came from Paiute territory. I heard many of Craig Bates' works and find them very questionable and inaccurate. I suggest people read the one and only account of first contact and try to get your hands on an original copy, not one made later. That would be Lafayette H. Bunnell's "Discovery of the Yosemites, 1851, and the war that led to that event". Bunnell was the only person to meet Chief Tenaya and write about him, not Kroeber or Hart.Read more ›
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Format: Unknown Binding
This is an interesting booklet on the Southern Yosemite Miwok who inhabited Yosemite Valley and the surrounding region. It was written to go with the recreated Miwok village behind the Yosemite Visitor Center.

The interesting part is the text is in Miwok and English.

The previous reviewer apparently has an ax to grind. True, in the 20th century the Miwok intermarried Piute, and Piute spouses moved into Yosemite Valley, but this booklet covers the life before the disasterous contact with European man in the mid-1800s.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Walter on June 23, 2005
Format: Unknown Binding
Most Indians in Yosemite are Paiutes, Monos or Yokuts. I have seen the census rolls from the earliest point to now.
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