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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strong Addition to a great series.
Clint Willis has stuck with the formula that propelled this series to success by locating writings on Organized Crime that we probably would never see otherwise - and it's all great stuff. It would have been easy to pull excerpts from sensationalized tell-alls on the True Crime shelf, but luckily that's NOT where Mr. Willis takes us. The writing of Peter Maas takes us...
Published on September 15, 2001 by Andy Entwistle

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Nasty compilation of good books...
You're much better off going to the original books this compilation rips off. There are editing mistakes galore in this volume, and the editor adds nothing new (except some typos). I'd sell mine as a used book but I don't want to rip off someone else with this trash.
Published on October 19, 2007 by Mook Merkin


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strong Addition to a great series., September 15, 2001
Clint Willis has stuck with the formula that propelled this series to success by locating writings on Organized Crime that we probably would never see otherwise - and it's all great stuff. It would have been easy to pull excerpts from sensationalized tell-alls on the True Crime shelf, but luckily that's NOT where Mr. Willis takes us. The writing of Peter Maas takes us into a money-making scheme gone bad, "Joey" explains how to set up a hit. For the story of Donnie Brasco, instead of going the easy route and plugging in an action chapter, the editor took an opening section from the book, on the mundane things that the FBI agent had to do to be accepted in his undercover role - fascinating. A mafia wife gives us a look from her perspective. The chapter from Casino avoids the casino itself and shows us instead how organized crime launders its money through semi-legitimate sources to get control of the casinos. One chapter discusses the tightrope relationship of a Don and his lawyer, another one shows the interplay between a mob informant and his FBI handler. It's all great stuff that you probably haven't seen before, and will likely motivate you to buy some of the source books. Only two excerpts are fiction and one, from the Godfather, is from a pivotal movie scene. This book is a great gift for any true-crime reader.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MOB is the best book I've ever read., March 8, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Mob: Stories of Death and Betrayal From Organized Crime (Adrenaline) (Audio Cassette)
This book is great,it is what got me hooked on stories about the mob and mafia. I would recomend it to any one who is intrested in organized crime.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A realistic, thrilling story, May 8, 2003
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Overall, I think that this book was exceptional. The stories contained are, for the most part, gripping and real. I couldn't put the book down when I read the story by "Joey", the anonymous hitman. The most exciting thing about this book is the reality of it. The mojority of stories contained are about real people and real things. I recommend this book to everyone
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fine Collection, April 30, 2002
This is, for a "fan" of the Mafia, is almost a must own. It is filled with book excerpts and magazine articles and 2 works of fiction, the rest is all "true". Or at least as true as Mafia stories go. My favorite excerpts from this book were the brief portion of Donnie Brasco. It showed just how mundane going undercover in the Mob can be. I also quite enjoyed the section from "Killer". We get to see the mob through a hitmans eyes. He tells you how cold he is and how after the first couple of hits, he could murder someone then go spend a quiet evening with his family. He never felt remorse because in his mind "You must have done something pretty bad to bring em to your door." Also the excerpt from "Boss of Bosses" is comical in the sense that the Mafia Don of the Gambino crime family convinced the 2 FBI agents that had him in custody, to take him out to lunch. All in all this a fascinating collection that shows the dark side of the mob that tends to get glossed over by the Hollywood productions.
Thanks for your time.
T
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Nasty compilation of good books..., October 19, 2007
By 
Mook Merkin (Arlington, MA USA) - See all my reviews
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You're much better off going to the original books this compilation rips off. There are editing mistakes galore in this volume, and the editor adds nothing new (except some typos). I'd sell mine as a used book but I don't want to rip off someone else with this trash.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Blood and Gore With the Mafia, May 5, 2009
MOB, Stories of Death and Betrayal From Organized Crime

Each of the thirteen accounts in this book fulfills expectations raised by the above title. There are selections by Peter Maas and William Kennedy. A section from Mario Puzo's "The Godfather," accompanies a Fredrick Dannen report on "Defending the Mafia."
There are blood and gore sufficient to satisfy most appetites, as each selection entertains, informs, and above all, keeps the reader awake.

We are told at the beginning that there is no such thing as an organization called "the Mafia." Yet, some of the stories use the word as though there were. Maybe an unavoidable use when we recognize that Mafioso can be at war with each other so that, if the Mafia were an organization, some of its parts can become dysfunctional, threatening to tear the organization apart.

Rather, being "Mafia," the book's introductions tells us, represents an outlook, one in which personal honor and willingness to defend it, are far more important than civil law and peace, or of any personal code of virtue that doesn't place personal honor as paramount. Violation of a man's honor is to be redeemed by punishing the violator, perhaps by taking his life. In striking similarity with aspects we hear today of radical Islamism, a wife or sister violates the family honor by becoming pregnant out of wedlock, or consorting with the wrong types, often requiring that she be murdered to restore the family's (male) honor. It may be that this view of women in Islam and the Mafia code both arise from long-ago ideas about the sexes that prevailed in the eastern Mediterranean.

Notwithstanding that sorry concepts like that about female "virtue" can motivate violent acts, this collection of vignettes makes for exciting reading that will satisfy just about anyone.

Charles Tillinghast, author of "How Capitol Got the Beatles, and Then What Happened," and "American Broadcast Regulation and the First Amendment."
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4.0 out of 5 stars Mafia Buffet, December 6, 2007
By 
This book is not unlike a buffet at a small office party. A few morsels here and there... most everything is pretty tasty, nothing's too filling, and there's one "mystery dish" that looks okay...... until you bite into it.

Clint Willis has compiled a baker's dozen of mob-stories, from the infamous, to the you-never-heard-of-em. Some are great, some are good, and some might have been better to have been left on the table.

On the infamous side is an excerpt from Mario Puzo's classic, THE GODFATHER. I've never read the book, but like any other self-respecting adult American male, I've seen the movie enough times to have lost count. After reading the excerpt in MOB, (regarding the memorable scene where Michael Corleone retrieves the gun from the restaurant bathroom and shoots the crooked cop in the head), I've discovered that I've GOT to read Puzo's book!

Another interesting story comes from David Fisher. It comes from a book by "JOEY," a long-time mob hit-man (though not a "made" man in the mob, because, as "Joey" tells it, as a member of the Jewish faith, he is ineligible to attain that level within the organization.) Still, he considers himself really good--and quite enjoys what he does for a living. And, it would appear that he's very much a psychopath. Whether one can believe everything that is written about JOEY is questionable, as there seemed to be a number of "facts" that contradicted other "facts," but I guess that's for each reader to decide.

I did actually SKIP one story: Bruce McCall's "GANGLAND STYLE: THE TRANSCRIPT." Written in the format of a play, I became disinterested after about a page and a half of reading accented-goombah-speak spelled out phonetically.

Jeffrey Goldberg's piece, THE DON IS DONE, is the final chapter in the book, and is the fascinating true story of the last days--along with some of the personal insights of mob boss, Paul Castellano... whacked, so the story goes, under the orders of the notorious John Gotti, Sr.

All in all, MOB was a pretty enjoyable read. And because each of the stories stands completely by itself, you could theoretically finish a chapter, and pick the book up a year later without having to start over.

- Jonathan Sabin
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4.0 out of 5 stars Nice sampler from the mob buffet, October 21, 2002
Only the most ardent organized crime reader probably won't find something new in this collection of short stories dealing with reader fascination with dangerous lifestyles. This sampler of mob-lore covers stories allegedly by the folks who lived and died it, and some history to add dessert to your meal.
For those who like the relative safety of their reading chair, we get a step-by-step process of the so-called "hit men" of the mob. They are so-called because most members who have reached any decent level of leadership have all done at least one hit, so the true full-time professional is not that common. For this profession though, we do get an evolution of the man, and his general techniques.
The stories here are excerpts from other works, so if your a mob junkie, you might have read a lot of it already. I previously had read the Sammy Gravano book that contributed this excerpt. You not only get a sample of the self-admitted bad man, but also a taste of what I didn't like in the full-length book, which was a constant jabbering of what a decent, honorable guy Sammy really is. This book, was, of course, before the guy got busted out West for running meth labs while in witness protection.
My favorite of the "true life" stories was the one that inspired the movie "Donnie Brasco". Here we have the story of how a guy had to sacrifice a lot of family time over a period of years to do his undercover work, even once having to spend Christmas with mobsters when he promised his own family some quality Holiday time. The book I'm reviewing is good because now I want to read the whole "Brasco" saga.
In the history part, we do get a brief glimpse of how this whole type of society came about. True, the people of Italy were extremely oppressed at the time of it's formation, but it also tells how the local culture first establishes male "honor", then expects him to prove it via competition, and if you won by using your own rules, that made you that much more of a worthy opponent. To his credit, the editor of this compilation does not glorify this behavior, and makes it clear to the audience that any honorable "codes" only last as long as is convenient for anyone involved.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read it or else...., July 30, 2002
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Fans of The Sopranos, the Godfather, and mob/crime fiction/nonfiction will find this Clint Willis-edited book a virtual Hometown Buffet of delicious crime treats. If you like mob fiction/nonfiction and don't read this you deserve to wake up with a horse's head in your bed.
A sign of this book's huge success is that it truly leaves you wanting more. You'll be so fascinated that you'll DEFINITELY want to go to each of the primary sources and read them too. It's a fast, fascinating read: chapters comprised of well-edited excerpts from books, magazine articles and two works of fiction.
I was especially fascinated (and motivated) by the excerpt from the fictional (I think) Godfather. I read the book when I came out, saw the flicks a zillion times but realized in reading this excerpt how great the original book was and how it differs from the movie (the Michael character actually seems stronger in the original story). I'll be re-reading that book soon.
Every chapter is a gem and there are too many to go into here. My favorites included Peter Maas' excerpt from Underboss, the story of Sammy the Bull Gravano; an excerpt from mob hitman "Joey's" book Killer (the code of honor, precisely how he makes a hit with such efficiency and low risk); part of Nicholas Pileggi's Casino, describing how a horrified businessman one day found himself cemented to mob-connected business partners; Defending the Mafia, the eye-opening and ultimately sad story of mob lawyer Gerald Shargel's use of his considerable talent to keep mafiosos out of jail; part of Boss of Bosses, the bittersweet saga of aging Don Paul Castellano, eventually murdered by ambitious John Gotti's skilled associates; and the saddest and most poignent piece of all, Jeffrey Goldberg's The Don Is Done, about the lives of children of bigwig mafiosos.
This book MOVES. And it'll send you scrambling to read more. A MUST to read or to gift.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Different angles on the Mob, November 5, 2011
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I bought this book for my boyfriend who reads all things related to the Mafia. He told me he liked it because it was not the same old stuff he's read before. Every essay was from a different writer on a unique subject. He read the book very quickly which tells me that he enjoyed it.
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Mob: Stories of Death and Betrayal From Organized Crime (Adrenaline)
Mob: Stories of Death and Betrayal From Organized Crime (Adrenaline) by Fredric Dannen (Audio Cassette - January 1, 2002)
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