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Mobile Design Pattern Gallery: UI Patterns for Mobile Applications Paperback – March 13, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1449314323 ISBN-10: 1449314325 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 284 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (March 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449314325
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449314323
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #893,084 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

UI Patterns for iOS, Android, and More

About the Author

Theresa Neil is a user experience consultant in Austin, Texas, where she designs rich applications for start-ups and Fortune500 companies.


More About the Author

Theresa Neil is an international design expert based in Austin Texas. She is passionate about making products that look good and work well. Her top selling O'Reilly books, Designing Web Interfaces, co-authored with Bill Scott, and the Mobile Design Pattern Gallery have helped thousands of IT professionals advance their design skills and create better experiences.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Fausto Albamonte on March 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is a good and much needed book, but unfortunately is in gray scale, so all the graphic examples/comparisons are difficult to fully appreciate and analyze.

Would have appreciate to be warned about it (all my other similar O'Reilly books came in colors). I'm returning it today.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. Friesel Jr. on March 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
I just wrapped up reading [1] Theresa Neil's "Mobile Design Pattern Gallery" (published by O'Reilly), and I am happy to call it a worthwhile survey. I say "survey" because that's exactly what we have here: Neil takes a look at the dominant patterns (and anti-patterns) in the application interface designs that are targeted at mobile devices, and casts a wide net to cover as many of the major patterns as possible. The book does not take a particularly deep dive into any of the specific patterns--or even any one constellation of patterns--but it does hit the high notes for the critical interface paradigms that an application interface developer will face.

Neil covers these patterns as befits the survey style: by presenting each one (categorized/grouped accordingly), giving a short description of what characterizes the patterns, what situations present a good fit for that pattern, as well as pointing out the most common risks associated with that pattern. Each pattern then gets a series of screenshots from actual mobile applications which serve to demonstrate a successful or particularly illustrative example of that pattern. Neil covers: primary and secondary navigations (chapter 1); all kinds of forms and form elements (chapter 2); tables and lists (chapter 3) and charts (chapter 6); searching, sorting, and filtering (chapter 4); on-screen tools (chapter 5) and providing user feedback (chapter 8); as well as how to create accessible help messaging (chapter 9) and "invitations" within the application to draw users to those other elements (chapter 7). There is some repetition of patterns across chapters, but that helps to impress upon you how valuable these patterns are, and why they work the way that they work in those contexts.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin L. on April 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Don't buy this book. Mobile UI have so much evolved since it has been published that it's almost useless now.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By rdepablo on September 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you don't trust me (in any case something very logical) you can download the preview. Really a good inversion, a second book with a more technical point of view, probably with examples in one or two technology (jquery mobile, ios) would be very well received.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Shawn Day on June 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
Mobile Design Pattern Library by Theresa Neil is a useful if not essential addition to the library of anyone working in mobile application design today. Neil has systematically compiled a comprehensive means of describing interface elements and classifying between their current variations. She covers the most popular mobile OS's providing a profusion of screen captures and successfully develops a language akin to Christopher Alexander's work in architecture and design to identify the role and the way in which different choices interact as part of a larger system. The roughly 250 page volume is comprehensive and as many have already noted an excellent well of ideas for interface designers, not just in the mobile space, but more widely. As purely a mobile interface users rather than developer I have to admit a fascination with the art. I am using a Nokia Lumia 800 Windows Phone right now to contrast it with my iOS experience. I found no issues with iOS have been an eager proponent of its simplicity and ease of use. I have WebOS and Android phones around as sandboxes. I am currently quite fascinated/fond of the Metro UI and willing to give it a chance to impress. As a pure sidenote - the wireframes in Neil's book themselves bear a resemblance to the very simplistic approach of the Metro UI which I have a sense to why I find an immediate attraction: there's little or no metaphor in the UI. Well, maybe not - my experimentation continues. Interface experience is hugely personal and the role of appropriate design is aided greatly by this volume. It puts the pieces in a larger context, concisely demonstrates the variances in implementation between platforms and does so with appropriate nod to the art of user experience of the printed or digital eBook.Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Donna Lichaw on March 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been waiting for a reference like this to come out for a while. Now that it's out, it hasn't left my side in weeks. I downloaded the kindle version to use on my iPad so I could quickly reference patterns on the fly (I'm a paper book person, but lately have found digital versions to be way more useful since I always have my iPad or Nook on me, anyway).

The Mobile Design Pattern Gallery is a useful reference for UX Designers (like me) as well as engineers and product managers - for anyone who touches on the design and development of mobile apps. As much as I love to say things like "well, that's an anti-pattern" and "a more standard pattern for XYZ would be ___," I'm just going to recommend this book to the engineers, product managers, and visual designers I work with. That way, we can be on the same page earlier on in the design/dev process and have a common knowledge base and vocabulary.

Quick read; invaluable reference. Now I can't wait for Theresa Neil to write the tablet version of this book :)
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