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Mobius Dick Paperback – Unabridged, June 3, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Picador (June 3, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330419927
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330419925
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.8 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,422,442 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"'Crumey is one of my three or four favourite modern writers - a wise, funny, alert and original novelist who has never disappointed' - Jonathan Coe 'I loved it! Just exhilerating!' - Fay Weldon But while Mobius Dick is a work of sophisticated erudition, its playfulness and artistry make it a page-turner, too. It is perhaps the only novel about quantum mechanics you could imagine reading while lying on a beach. - Joseph O'Connor 'solid plutonium, and unflaggingly enjoyable' - Sunday Times 'the most rewarding book I have read all year' - Independent On Sunday It would be nice to think that this magnificent piece of work stood a chance of winning the Booker. It's certainly my novel of the year. - Time Out 'There's no room here to do justice to the density of ideas Crumey unpacks with admirable lightness. - Sunday Herald"

About the Author

Andrew Crumey has a PhD in theoretical physics and is liteary editor of Scotland On Sunday. His novels have been translated widely, and won several prizes.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tooloud on March 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
Puzzling, complex, entertaining, informative, intriguing... I haven't got a thesaurus handy, but the point is when it was all over I certainly wasn't sorry. I was left with almost no emotional feeling of invlovement with any of the characters. Whether this was due to the fact that I wasn't sure which characters were real, imagined, duplicitous or even multiplicitous, I can't be sure. Just as I can't be sure if this was ever intended to exist as an elaborate thought exercise or a brief history of physics with a sprinkle of philosophy and music as garnish, or was the author actually trying to write a novel. I was trying to read a novel, but I'm not sure if I did. Or perhaps I did - but a different me - and that one really enjoyed it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on May 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
If you're presumptuous enough to think you might understand something, post-modernist deconstruction will relieve you of that conceit. John Ringer, like many of us, had some comprehension of Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". Confused by an enigmatic message on his cell 'phone, he attends a "deconstructionist" lecture on the novel. He comes away with insights neither he, nor anyone sane, could devise. The message's originator, "H", puts him in mind of a past love. As the memories emerge, John finds himself caught up in a bizarre concept. A mighty computer, using ultra-accurate mirrors, is being considered, and he may be instrumental in its development. He's also aware of its inherent dangers. It could demolish the universe.

Crumey's background in theoretical physics makes him well-placed to launch this tale of alternative universes. He is also a captivating and imaginative writer, versed in history, philosophy and human motivations. It is sometimes difficult to track how many universes might compose this story. Two is more than enough, but Crumey takes us through them with skill and finesse. We meet Erwin Schroedinger, heading for an assignation at an asylum. Thomas Mann's alternative writing career is considered. As is almost inevitable from a UK writer, the British Isles are conquered by Nazi Germany, but liberated by an unexpected ally.

John Ringer's message might be from one Harry Dick, lying on a hospital bed after being struck by an auto. Harry is told he's suffering from AMD - a syndrome of "false memories". Are they truly "false", or is this a symptom of flitting between those alternative universes? Crumey takes us through thickets of intrigue and deception with poise.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. Holland on February 2, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
composed in a sort of narrative mobius strip this novel balances several intersecting alternative worlds in an ingenious fictional exploration of the weird implications of quantum theory. that makes it sound unreadable but it's actually lively, entertaining, and easy enough to follow. technically it's deeply enjoyable: the basic idea is witty and subtle and flexible enough to allow crumey to manuver deftly through his ideas, and he layers his stories beautifully. it reminded me of pynchon without the ego, and delillo without the anguish. if you liked white noise and gravity's rainbow this is your kind of book.
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Format: Hardcover
If you're presumptuous enough to think you might understand something, post-modernist deconstruction will relieve you of that conceit. John Ringer, like many of us, had some comprehension of Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". Confused by an enigmatic message on his cell 'phone, he attends a "deconstructionist" lecture on the novel. He comes away with insights neither he, nor anyone sane, could devise. The message's originator, "H", puts him in mind of a past love. As the memories emerge, John finds himself caught up in a bizarre concept. A mighty computer, using ultra-accurate mirrors, is being considered, and he may be instrumental in its development. He's also aware of its inherent dangers. It could demolish the universe.

Crumey's background in theoretical physics makes him well-placed to launch this tale of alternative universes. He is also a captivating and imaginative writer, versed in history, philosophy and human motivations. It is sometimes difficult to track how many universes might compose this story. Two is more than enough, but Crumey takes us through them with skill and finesse. We meet Erwin Schroedinger, heading for an assignation at an asylum. Thomas Mann's alternative writing career is considered. As is almost inevitable from a UK writer, the British Isles are conquered by Nazi Germany, but liberated by an unexpected ally.

John Ringer's message might be from one Harry Dick, lying on a hospital bed after being struck by an auto. Harry is told he's suffering from AMD - a syndrome of "false memories". Are they truly "false", or is this a symptom of flitting between those alternative universes? Crumey takes us through thickets of intrigue and deception with poise. You may wonder which life is "real", but he demonstrates how reality isn't an easily defined condition.
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