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Moccasin Trail (Puffin Newberry Library) Paperback


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Moccasin Trail (Puffin Newberry Library) + Freedom Train: The Story of Harriet Tubman + By the Great Horn Spoon!
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Series: Puffin Newberry Library
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; Reprint edition (October 7, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140321705
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140321708
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #291,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 33 customer reviews
This book is well written.
M. Heiss
I thought it was an excellent book and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading a good adventure book.
Derek Negro
While the mid-1800s jargon was slightly distracting, it gets easier to read after every page.
M. Westphall

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Pace on September 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Jim Keath is the main character of the story. He goes through his share of difficulties in order to find out who he really is. He was quite young when he sneaked away from home to follow his Uncle. The Uncle was wild and lived the life of a trapper. This is the life Jim learned until a tragic accident took place between him and a bear. His life was changed forever by this experience. He was nursed back to life by an old indian squaw and slowly became a part of the Crow tribe. He lived with them six years and began to feel more like and Indian than white. That was fine until he learned of the death of his mother. He also learned that he was needed by his two brothers and sister. This set in motion a series of events that would change his life forever again! My nine year old daughter truly enjoyed the book despite the fact that I thought she would struggle with many of the words and writing style. I recommend it to you, but parents should take the time to read it to younger children.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Derek Negro on February 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
The book I read is titled Moccasin Trail; it was written by Eloise Jarvis Mcgraw. It is a book about a young man Jim Keath who was impressed by his uncle who was a trapper. He was so influenced by the ways of his uncle that he runs away from home to follow his uncle. Not only did he not let his parents know that he was following his uncle, but he failed to let his uncle know as well. He finally made himself known to his uncle and shortly afterward a bear attacked their camp. The bear mauled Jim. A group of Crow Indians found him, took him to their camp and proceeded to treat him as one of their own. He ran away from them too, to begin trapping; this is where the story begins. This book is a very good book; it has a good story. It has its happy, sad, funny, frustrating, and suspenseful moments. It is a book about the old west before large amounts of settling actually took place. Almost the entire book is an adventure, from surviving the harsh winter up on the Rocky Mountains pass to running for his life from a group of Indians. It was a very good book-the kind that you don¹t want to put down until you have finished reading it. I really enjoyed reading this book I found it to be extremely interesting and exciting. I have always been interested in adventure reading, especially when it seems as it could be true. That is what was so great about this book; it could very easily have been a true story not like one of those science fiction adventures. I thought it was an excellent book and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading a good adventure book.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 11, 1999
Format: Turtleback
If you llike the outdoors, the ways of the Old West, and unmatched descriptions, this is a book you should look into. The happenings of the book are so well described that you can see, hear, taste, feel and smell every detail possible throughou the book. Mrs. McGraw sends a vivid picture of setting into the reader's mind so well that you could feel the grizzly take a swipe at Jim's face. Readers of any age could fall in love with this adventure story. It is not specified toward one age group. Young readers can experience this book, and grow substantially in thier reading and writing skills, as well as other skills such as how they express themselves. Adults can benefit remarkably simply becuase they will have such an an\dventure in itself reading it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gale Finlayson on February 13, 2011
Format: Paperback
Jim Keath, the 19-year-old protagonist, is a young man caught in a serious culture clash, struggling to determine his own destiny. Eldest of four he ran away from civilized farming life, tangled with a vicious grizzly, was nursed back to health and adopted--as a replacement son--by kind Crow Indians. After nine years during which he has "counted coup" and learned the skills of a warrior, he steals a prize mare and runs away again--haunted my childhood memories of the family he abandoned. Teaming up with Tom Rivers, a veteran mountain man, Jim enjoys beaver trapping--until the beavers are about trapped out. Now what can he do with his life?

After receiving a crumpled letter from his long lost brother (which he can't even read), hand delivered by friendly Indians, Jim parts ways from Tom to seek the remnants of his family: Jonnie 17, Sally 15, and golden-haired Daniel 6. The odyssey of his physical journey (running the gorge, outwitting hostile Indians, wintering out, clearing the land--like the Bourgeways whom he despises) makes fast-paced reading. Yet this story proves insightful YA fare, for MOCCASIN TRAIL plumbs the depths of a human heart torn between two worlds. Family unity is threatened on several occasions, while Jim's family loyalty is cruelly tested, for he clings tenaciously to his Indian customs and appearance, which horrifies his scornful sister.

Haunted by the memory of his medicine song dream (a young warrior' vision quest) Jim recalls the English words about a green valley and still waters. Yet how can he reject the power of his spirit Helpers to complete the transformation back to a white man? Every man needs to seek out his own home; can Talks Alone/Jim find peace in either world, as Mountain Men are a dying breed? This editon would be improved by a map showing the Keath family's migration west into Oregon Territory. Is an overland route truly possible?
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