Mockingbird Time [+Digital Booklet]

September 20, 2011 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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2:34
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Digital Booklet: Mockingbird Time

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 20, 2011
  • Release Date: September 20, 2011
  • Label: New Rounder
  • Copyright: (C) 2011 The Jayhawks Partnership. Under exclusive license to Rounder Records. Manufactured and distributed by Concord Music Group, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 50:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005LKB7H4
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,569 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Great songwriting, excellent playing.
Robert L. Murphy
A couple of songs have grown on me a little, mainly "She Walks In So Many Ways," but the bulk of the album just sounds like... bulk.
David S. Michaels
I wouldn't want to turn anyone off to listening/buying this album because there is still plenty to like about it.
JAK

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Andrew H. Lee on September 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Dear Music Appreciator,

I suggest that you buy this new album by The Jayhawks if...

...you find it noteworthy that this is the first new studio album by The Jayhawks in eight years, making it something of a milestone.

...you already know (or are interested to learn) that this is the first studio album by the classic 1995 Jayhawks lineup of Louris/Olson/O'Reagan/Grotberg/Perlman in sixteen years, making it an absolute milestone and a thrill for Jayhawks fans and quality music fans around the world. This is big, maybe even like The Eagles or Fleetwood Mac big...in a modest selling/never quite ready for prime time/the music comes first kind of way.

...you welcome the fact that this is the second studio album by principal singers/songwriters Mark Olson and Gary Louris in two years - making it a double your pleasure/double your fun sort of moment for Jayhawks fans who thought they'd died and gone to heaven with 2009's collaboration READY FOR THE FLOOD.

...you are a patient, careful, repeat listener that enjoys an album that is "a grower."

For me the album seemed to get off to a slow start with the first few songs, things got interesting with "Tiny Arrows," and then my attention faded in and out through the remaining nine tracks.

But as I listened again and again, the words/music/ideas and overall feel of this song collection began to twirl around my internal music meter and burrow into my brain a bit. New moments began to stand out and stick with me - the guitar solo at the 2:30 mark of "High Water Blues," the clear fragility in Mark Olson's lead vocals on "Mockingbird Time," the contemporary folksiness of "Black-Eyed Susan (and the remarkable detail of the spoon collection)...
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Mark Blevins on September 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD
As the reviewer above noted, this is the first Jayhawks album in eight years and the first with founding member Mark Olson in 16 years. It was worth the wait. For me this album wasn't a grower at all; I loved "Hide Your Colors" as soon as I heard it because it opens the album on a strong note, just like "Blue" and "Waiting For the Sun." This album does have more in common with the Olson-led Jayhawks of Hollywood Town Hall and Tomorrow the Green Grass than the later albums. I enjoy them all, but I am partial to the early material.

The album opener "Hide Your Colors" is classic Jayhawks - Olson and Gary Louris' voice intertwining together to sound as one while singing an upbeat ode to being oneself. The highlights are many on this disc; "She Walks in So Many Ways" bounced out of my speakers as a Byrds-like classic, while they band explored new territory on songs like "Tiny Arrows" and "Black Eyed Susan." Throughout the classic sound of the Jayhawks is present: chiming guitars, vocal harmonies and wonderful back up harmonies from keyboardist Karen Grotberg and drummer Tim O'Reagan.

This one stands strongly with the likes of HTH, TTGG and Rainy Day Music. "Guilder Annie" is another great tune that also has a mournful steel guitar in the background. I can't and won't stop listening to it. I've waited years for this to come out, and I'm so glad the band got together at least one more time to come up with some beautiful music. Fans of the band should enjoy this because it's everything the band is known for and the new songs stand up to their classics. Here's hoping the band receives not only the acclaim but the public support they so richly deserve this time around.
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29 of 36 people found the following review helpful By David S. Michaels on September 28, 2011
Format: Audio CD
As a besotted Jayhawks lover who only discovered this great band after their official demise in 2005, I was delighted to come across this CD while shopping for something entirely different during a long road trip. I eagerly slipped it into the car stereo, looking forward to some great road music to make the miles go by faster. On first listen, something sounded wrong-- where were those hook-filled songs with tight, soaring harmonies, crunchy chords, snappy solos? Figuring I'd missed something, I listened again, louder this time, hoping it would get better with repeated listening. Long story short, it didn't really improve. A couple of songs have grown on me a little, mainly "She Walks In So Many Ways," but the bulk of the album just sounds like... bulk. I'm heartened the band regrouped, but I think a rather serious miscalculation came at the beginning of the recording process: For whatever reason, Gary Louris (who shouldered most of the songwriting / singing load on the two previous albums after Mark Olson left) decided to subordinate himself to his returned compatriot, Mark Olson, and to cut his "Rainy Day Music" singing songwriting partner Tim O'Reagan out of the loop entirely. Producer Louris also seems to have decided to go for an "honest" live-in-studio sound rather than to spend a lot of time re-recording and crafting the all-important vocals. The results are nearly disastrous. The vocals sound slapdash, with harmonies only roughly worked out. Olson's singing is flat, tired and pedestrian throughout, as if he couldn't be bothered to do repeated takes to get his pitch right. Despite this, his vocals are mixed right up front, while Louris's high, pure voice and that of Karen Grotberg are buried.Read more ›
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