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Modern Classics Dubliners (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – International Edition, February 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0141182452 ISBN-10: 0141182458
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

James Joyce (1882-1941) was born and educated in Dublin. Although he spent most of his adult life outside Ireland, Joyce's psychological and fictional universe is firmly rooted in his native Dublin, the city which provides the settings and much of the subject matter for all his fiction. He is best known for his landmark novel Ulysses (1922) and its controversial successor Finnegans Wake (1939), as well as the short story collection Dubliners (1914) and the semi-autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916).
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Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Modern Classics
  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classic (February 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141182458
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141182452
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,021,674 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Herbert Plummer on December 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
Joyce's short story collection "Dubliners" transcends the ethos of the genre in its seemingly undramatic quality, its epiphanic climaxes, its focus on the nobodies of dreary Dublin. Indeed, Dublin becomes a microcosm for the world in these stories, and each character representative of mankind, much like Bloom's single-day experience in "Ulysses" is a microcosm of a whole lifetime.

Joyce examines specifically the paralysis of his city at the time, but on a larger scale he exposes the self-enslavement to which all human beings potentially fall subject. His heroes are not victorious, but they have been made aware. The reader is not as engrossed by what is actually happening as he is by how the character feels - and he is profoundly grateful and moved by this. No detail should be overlooked in these stories; each one quietly beholds the whole Universe.

The stories are arranged chronologically, so it is additionally rewarding to read them in order. If you'd rather pick and choose, don't miss "Araby", "Eveline", "A Little Cloud", and "The Dead", the latter being the masterpiece of the collection. Penguin Modern Classics version includes a scholarly introduction and notes on names, dates, places: informative but ancillary - read them after you've finished the stories.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Shalom Freedman HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 27, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is one of the greatest of story collections. It does in miniature what 'Ulysses ' will later do in a far more detailed and complete way i.e. give a picture of the life of the people of Dublin as a picture of the life of mankind in general. Its stories are structured thematically and connect with each other in multiple cross- reference. The surface details of each story, beginning with the names of the stories have rich symbolic meaning .

There is in the stories an intense lyricism and music which climax in the title story.

The great Joycean themes of stifling family, church, country are presented here without emphasis on what will be the central Joyce theme in 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man' and 'Ulysses ' - the liberating power of Art.

But the liberating power is there within the stories themselves which are deep renderings of the world Joyce has reforged in the smithy of his soul as his own.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
Joyce's only published collection of short stories feels like a whole work, instead of a smattering of pieces, the idea running throughout the collection that Dubliners (and perhaps humanity) are all looking for adventure of some kind. Whether adventure is finally settling down in life or not wanting to settle down, the adventure is that next unknown and shows itself in different forms throughout the stories.

Reviewed by Jonathan Stephens
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Galina on October 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
For many years, I promised myself to read the collection of Joyce's short stories and I finally did it on my 10 hours long flight from Athens to NYC last Saturday. What a fascinating and marvelous work - 15 short stories, 15 bright gems, each is a masterwork with few simply outstanding, "Eveline", "The Boarding House", "Counterparts", "A Painful Case", and "The Dead". "Ulysses" would happen eight years after "Dubliners" were published but with "Dubliners" Joyce proved himself a great writer, a master of psychological prose and an expert of human souls and conditions already. Highly recommended.

4.5/5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brandon Mann on August 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the old father, the old artificer, of all 20th century short stories. Each story is a gem, and together they tell like a rosary. "The Dead," is by itself a masterpiece which resonates long after you've finished it. Dubliners is Joyce's most accessible work, readable and enjoyable without losing any of its deeper nuances.
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Format: Paperback
Irish eyes did not always smile. This is apparent as we read the 15 stories included in the Penguin edition of "Dubliners." The stories were written from 1904-07 by the young author James Joyce. The tales look in microcosm at the ordinary denizens of Dublin. Dublin was the second largest city in the British Isles and a colonial city of the Empire planted by the English.
. Along the way there is plenty of:
a. Roman Catholic guilt
b. Tawdry sexual encounters
c. The theme of escape to the east across the Irish Sea towards the mainland of England.
d A thick fog of pea soup Irish gloom. Many of the tales take place at the hour of twilight and in the dark night. Foggy streets abound as well as gaslit streets teeming with horses and carriages.
e. The fragility of human life which soon passes away into the dark beyond the portals of the grave. This theme is best observed in The Dead which completes the collection.
"The Sisters" deals with the death of a poor priest and his two sisters who care for him in the last days of his suffering life. The priest was deeply disillusioned by life. This first story dealing with death is completed by The Dead story which ends the collection. The stories have come full circle.
b. Eveline is the story of a young maid who desires to flee with a new lover away from her drab life in Dublin. Escape is a major theme in this short story.
c. "A Short Encounter" and "Araby" portray the life of an Irish Catholic schoolboy who dreams of flight from his society. These stories draw upon Joyce's Dublin days. He spent most of his life in exile from Ireland.
d. The Encounter is about young men eager to pick up girls in the streets.
e.
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