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Molecular Biology of the Gene, Fifth Edition Hardcover – December 3, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0805346350 ISBN-10: 080534635X Edition: 5th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 830 pages
  • Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; 5th edition (December 3, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080534635X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805346350
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #345,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Introduction to BotanyThe long-awaited new edition of James D. Watson's classic text, Molecular Biology of the Gene, has been thoroughly revised and is published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Watson and Crick's paper on the structure of the DNA double-helix. Twenty-one concise chapters, co-authored by five highly respected molecular biologists, provide current, authoritative coverage of a fast-changing discipline, giving both historical and basic chemical context. Divided into four parts: Genetics and Chemistry, Central Dogma, Regulation, and Methods. For college instructors, students, and anyone interested in molecular biology and genetics.

About the Author

James D. Watson was Director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory from 1968 to 1993 and is now its President. He spent his undergraduate years at the University of Chicago and received his Ph.D. in 1950 from Indiana University. Between 1950 and 1953, he did postdoctoral research in Copenhagen and Cambridge, England. While at Cambridge, he began the collaboration that resulted in the elucidation of the double-helical structure of DNA in 1953. (For this discovery, Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1962.) Later in1953, he went to the California Institute of Technology. He moved to Harvard in 1955, where he taught and did research on RNA synthesis and protein synthesis until 1976. He was the first Director of the National Center for Genome Research of the National Institutes of Health from 1989 to 1992. Dr. Watson was sole author of the first, second, and third editions of Molecular Biology of the Gene, and a co-author of the fourth edition. These were published in 1965, 1970, 1976, and 1987 respectively. Watson has also been involved in two other textbooks: he was one of the original authors of Molecular Biology of the Cell and is also an author of Recombinant DNA: a short course.Tania A. Baker is the Whitehead Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She received a B.S. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Stanford University in 1988. Her graduate research was carried out in the laboratory of Professor Arthur Kornberg and focused on mechanisms of initiation of DNA replication. She did postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Dr. Kiyoshi Mizuuchi at the National Institutes of Health, studying the mechanism and regulation of DNA transposition. Her current research explores mechanisms and regulation of genetic recombination, enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding, and ATP-dependent protein degradation. Professor Baker received the 2001 Eli Lilly Research Award from the American Society of Microbiology and the 2000 MIT School of Science Teaching Prize for Undergraduate Education. She is co-author (with Arthur Kornberg) of the book DNA Replication, Second Edition.Stephen P. Bell is a Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an Assistant Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He received B.A. degrees from the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology and the Integrated Sciences Program at Northwestern University and a Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley in 1991. His graduate research was carried out in the laboratory of Robert Tjian and focused on eukaryotic transcription. He did postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Dr. Bruce Stillman at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, working on the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. His current research focuses on the mechanisms controlling the duplication of eukaryotic chromosomes. Professor Bell received the 2001 ASBMBÐSchering Plough Scientific Achievement Award, and the Everett Moore Baker Memorial Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching at MIT in 1998. Alexander Gann is Editorial Director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, and a faculty member of the Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. He received his B.Sc in microbiology from University College London and a Ph.D. in molecular biology from The University of Edinburgh in 1989. His graduate research was carried out in the laboratory of Noreen Murray and focused on DNA recognition by restriction enzymes. He did postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Mark Ptashne at Harvard, working on transcriptional regulation, and that of Jerem

Customer Reviews

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I like that they leave space in the margin to write notes.
E Schauberger
I got this book to assist for my prep for the Biochemistry GRE - I know a lot about Biology.
J. Elliott
The practice will help you to understand other things you will read later.
Edward F. Strasser

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Edward F. Strasser on July 12, 2005
I am a layman with a serious interest in biology. I read science news, especially in Nature and Scientific American, and I often find that I don't have enough background to understand articles at the level at which I want to understand them. I bought this book hoping to get that background, and I wasn't disappointed.

For example, once the human genome was sequenced, it appeared that there were far too few genes for an organism as complex as ourselves. But investigation shows that most genes occur in segments and that the messenger RNA must be cut and spliced before the protein can be formed. Often there are two or more ways the RNA may be spliced, so that one gene can specify more than one protein. Another problem is that the genome seemed to consist mostly of sections that don't code for proteins; these were called "junk". But it turns out that some "junk" DNA codes for RNA sequences that have catalytic and regulatory roles, roles which used to be considered the bailiwick of proteins alone. Articles about topics such as these used to confuse me thoroughly, but after reading this book I find them much clearer.

This book benefits from a great many illustrations and I recommend that you go through each one as you would a worked problem in a math text. Observe how the pieces fit together, how a particular group of atoms enhances or inhibits a reaction. The practice will help you to understand other things you will read later.

I called this a "reference" for good reason: I assume that I will come across many future articles which will send me back to it to fill in some background.

[Added 4 July 2006] As I assumed when I first wrote this review, I have used it for reference.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Elliott on September 18, 2006
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I got this book to assist for my prep for the Biochemistry GRE - I know a lot about Biology. So this is a great Book - First, It is very readable - I was surprised I was not able to put it down and knocked off 100 pages in record time. Besided that - it is enjoyable and not dull and boring - Second, The great experiments are given and insight into the science reasoning behind them also. This book makes the discover of genetics, DNA, RNA and protein building come alive. Third, this book is very current with research and cites the papers and journals where the important biology, Genetic, molecular & cell biology was published. That alone would save you the time to research and site these for your own research. Lastly, the pictures and recollections of the experimenters and "who knew who" are a total hoot.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R. Literman on March 17, 2006
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This book is an awesome teaching guide but the real prize goes to the CD and animations. Where a subject might be a bit hazy in the text, the flash animations on the CD are clear and concise.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Russell A. Rohde MD on November 18, 2007
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"Molecular Biology of the Gene," James Watson et. al, 5th Edition, CSHL Press, NY 2004, ISBN 0-8053-4635-X, HC 732 pages, includes Preface, Index & inter-active CD-ROM & Website. 11 1/4" x 8 3/4".

J.D. Watson authored first three editions (1965-'76), co-authored 4th ('87) & this 5th ('04) with Baker, Bell, Gann, Levine & Losick. CD works in Windows, but Mac OS X needs Classic for some sections (CHIME). This treatise has 21 chapters divided into 5 major parts: I-Chem.& Genetics, II-Genome Maintenance, III-Genome Expression, IV-Regulation and V-Methodologies.

The discourse best assumes readers to have both core & some advanced study in biology, chemistry, physics & genetics. It is a tutorial & reference manual with detailed covering of history of genetics, Mendelian heredity, elucidation & clarificaion of double helix, Crick's central dogma 1956, genetic code, weak & high-energy bonds, protein structure, conformation, modularity & domains, allostery, topologies, RNA structure, chromosomal sequence & diversity, duplication, chromatin structure & regulation, nucleosome assembly, DNA polymerase, binding & unwinding, replication error & repairs, DNA damage, recombination, transposition, transciption, splicings, shuffling, ribosomes, gene regulation in pro- & eu-karyotes, embryogenesis of Drosophila, genome evolution & methodologies for phage, bacteria, yeast, fly & mouse.

A formidable and now classic text fittingly entrusted to an elite working group in the US, UK and Canada. Most comforting is the liberal use of diagrams on essentially every page & the interactive CD.
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