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Molly's Pilgrim Paperback


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Revised edition (April 26, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688162800
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688162801
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 4.9 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #57,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A Russian immigrant girl adjusts to the American celebrations of Thanksgiving and birthdays, respectively. Ages 5-8; 6-10.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Gr 1-3-Molly, a young Russian Jewish immigrant, feels that she doesn't belong and will never belong in America. Her third grade classmates make fun of her accent, her dress, her customs and mock her with a sing-song rhyme, "Jol-ly Mol-ly, Your eyes are awf'ly small. Jol-ly Mol-ly, Your nose is awf'ly tall." With the help of a loving mother and the understanding of a sensitive teacher, Molly earns class recognition and, finally, happiness. Her clothespin Pilgrim doll resembles her Russian mother more than a traditional Pilgrim, for her mother is indeed a pilgrim who came to America for religious freedom. Christina Moore's dramatic reading intensifies the emotion and evokes the pathos of this moving narrative. Young listeners will sympathize and empathize with Molly and will gain a greater appreciation for all Pilgrims in America. This story will encourage dialogue and lively discussions on numerous topics: American values, tolerance, religious freedom, Thanksgiving traditions, Jewish customs and holidays. It will captivate an attentive audience every month of the year.

Patricia Mahoney Brown, Franklin Elementary School, Kenmore, NY

Copyright 1998 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Molly's Pilgrim is an excellent story of the true meaning of Thanksgiving.
Meena C.
They tease her, and call her names, making fun of her voice, and her eyes, and anything else that they could possibly think of to make fun of her.
Erika Sorocco
I'd recommend it to any little kids, who are eager to read a Thanksgiving story.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on June 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
Ladies and gentlemen, I come before you today with a confession. I, knowingly and without malice, am a wimp. I am a wimp of the finest pedigree, forged in the wimpy steps of my wimpy forebears. This loathsome quality only cares to show itself in the oddest of moments. Normally, I feel relatively safe reading children's books and, especially, picture books. Certainly the protagonists in these tales have their trials and tribulations to endure, but they usually do so with relative good faith and their enemies are by and large trampled soundly at the end of their tales. Usually. Then there are books like, "Molly's Pilgrim". Ladies and gentlemen, if your child can read through this book in its entirety without feeling overwhelmed by a sense of misery and woe then they're a stronger man or woman than I.

In this classic tale, a little girl named Molly is having problems at school. Her classmates tease her relentlessly, usually making fun of her funny accent and supposed un-American ways. Molly, you see, immigrated to this country with her mother and father from Russia. Jewish in faith, they originally lived in New York City, but now Molly's father has found steady employment in Winter Hill. Here, Molly is the only Jewish girl around, and she suffers mightily at the hands of the other girls. One day, Molly's teacher, Miss Stickley, decides that the class is going to do something a little different for Thanksgiving this year. Each child will design a pilgrim or an Indian for a little diorama and present it to the class. Molly is assigned a pilgrim, and she eagerly tells the assignment to her mama.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By slomamma on September 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
The only negative thing I can think of to say about this book is that when I read it aloud, I have a very hard time not crying. It is a short and simple story (longer than a picture book, but an adult can read it aloud in one sitting, and most second or third graders could read it to themselves), but one of the most moving children's books I know of.
Molly is a turn of the century Jewish immigrant girl from Russia. She lives in a small town, where no one understands her, and other children make fun of her clothes, and accent and her ignorance of American customs. In November, her classmates are appalled that she has never heard of Thanksgiving. But as we get to know Molly better, we, and eventually her classmates, realize that this child, who left her country and moved to America so that she and her family could practice their religion without fear is no different from the first pilgrims.
By the time they reach second or third grade, most children have heard the story of the first Thanksgiving many, many times. This is a wonderful way to renew the meaning of the story for them, by reminding them that people are still coming to American for the same reasons they came hundreds of years ago.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Meena C. on January 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
Molly's Pilgrim is an excellent story of the true meaning of Thanksgiving. Molly has just moved to America from Russia, and is not enjoying it one bit. Kids in her third grade class make fun of her all the time because of her clothes and accent. She can't stand it, especially her worst enemy, Elizabeth. When Molly's class starts a project on Thanksgiving, they are told to make a doll. When Molly tells her mother this, her mother makes a doll for her, and the doll looks exactly the way her mother did when she was a girl. Her mother tells her that the Pilgrims fled England because they wanted to practice their religion freely, this is exactly what Molly's parents did, making them Pilgrims. That day, Molly takes it to school, but it looks very different from everyone else's. The children make fun of her, but they have a very big lesson to learn; the true meaning of Thanksgiving. Anyone will enjoy this story, old or young, because many can relate to it.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Erika Sorocco on September 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
Molly is a young, Jewish immigrant from Russia, who moves to Winter Hill where she is a black sheep among the rest of her classmates. They tease her, and call her names, making fun of her voice, and her eyes, and anything else that they could possibly think of to make fun of her. When Miss Stickley, Molly's third-grade teacher, begins teaching the class about Thanksgiving, Molly is lost. That is, until she finds that Thanksgiving is an American holiday where everyone is grateful for what they have. The problem? Molly doesn't feel thankful. In fact, the only thing that would make her thankful is if her family could move back to New York City, and that won't be happening anytime soon. When Miss Stickley informs the class that they must make pilgrim dolls, Molly is excited to do the project. But when she finds that her mother has made the doll look more like a Russian immigrant, rather than a pilgrim, Molly knows that her troubles at school are about to get worse. But maybe...just maybe, the little Pilgrim is exactly what Molly needs...

It is rare that a book as short as Barbara Cohen's MOLLY'S PILGRIM could bring out such strong emotions in the reader, but that is exactly what it did. The character of Molly is sweet, and kind, and the way she is treated at school could bring tears to anyone's eyes, even if you aren't a crier by nature. The awful songs that Molly's classmates sing about her will choke everyone up, but, at the same time, let the reader feel exactly how people who are "different" are treated. This is a wonderful story that will warm everyone's heart, and teach the whole family about the first Thanksgiving.

Erika Sorocco

Book Review Columnist for The Community Bugle Newspaper
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