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Mommy Laid An Egg: Or, Where Do Babies Come From? Paperback – March 1, 1996


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Paperback, March 1, 1996
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Product Details

  • Grade Level: Preschool - 7
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (March 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811813193
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811813198
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 0.2 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #661,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Cole ( Supermoo ) unleashes her endearingly loony sense of humor on the subject of the birds and the bees, and the result is, as expected, hilarious. When a thoroughly befuddled set of '90s parents (he wears his gray hair in a ponytail, she wears Birkenstocks) decides to inform their offspring how babies are made, their explanations (babies are grown from seeds, made out of gingerbread, squeezed from tubes like toothpaste, brought by dinosaurs) are greeted with an explosion of giggles. Their children quickly grab paper and pen and proceed to set the record straight. Cole's drawings and simple text are candid without being offensive and, without getting terribly complicated or serious, communicate the essentials of conception and childbirth in a direct but light-hearted manner that will leave everyone grinning and no one embarrassed. As always, Cole's idiosyncratic, cartoon-style illustrations are a treat--and her renditions of greenhouse babies and baby-paste tubes are outrageously funny. All ages.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2-Someone laid an egg here, but it wasn't Mommy. What begins as an amusing premise gets waylaid along the way. Mom and Dad offer their kids twists on the old cliches about the birds and the bees. The children are wildly amused, and decide to teach their parents the facts of life, illustrated with their own crayon drawings. In the explanation, Mothers have eggs inside their bodies, while daddies have "'seeds in seed pods outside their bodies. Daddies also have a tube. The seeds come out of the pods and through the tube. The tube goes into the mommy's body through a hole.'" On a double-page spread, a line is drawn from Dad's penis to an opening in Mom, labeled "This fits in here." On the next page readers are shown some ways moms and dads fit together, copulating on a skateboard, hanging from balloons, etc. The "crayon" drawings are crude, but everyone gets the picture. Fertilization and birth follow. The cartoon characters and watercolored line drawings are vibrant and amusing-dad's gray hair is in a ponytail, while mom is a blonde earth-mother type. The kids are messy replicas of their parents. Joanna Cole's How You Were Born (Morrow, 1993) still sets the standard; this effort doesn't measure up.
Denise L. Moll, Lone Pine Elementary School, West Bloomfield, MI
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

72 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Kingdom Come on March 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful book that keeps humor in "the talk."

I am surprised by how many reviewers here oppose the sex theory in favor of the stork theory. Apparently, they never knew people needed to have sex to have babies. "How shocking! How offensive! And there're pictures of human body parts?" Do these people blindfold their children when it's bath time?

Look, if you're not an ignorant nematode, this is the book you've been looking for to give a good overview of sex and to keep your children from growing into sexually dysfunctional Amazon review trolls.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliant book and a terrific tool for teaching young children how babies are made. I gave it to my pediatrician and he read it to his kids. It uses gentle humour and non-threatening language to directly answer any questions. My young children love it and they now have an understanding of the facts and an appreciation that baby making is a happy thing and, yes, a little silly. It really helped prepare them for the arrival of their little brother.
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Kehoe on March 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
What a magnificent book! Demythologise sex and teach children the basics of reproduction from an early age, and we have the beginnings of a healthier, less prudish society.
I just wish I were supple enough to try sex on a skateboard...
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63 of 70 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on November 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
Ah, ire. Lovely lovely ire. Nothing gets parents more hot under the collar than debating the relative merits of a sex-ed picture book. Suddenly, once sane and collected adults erupt into veritable Mount Vesuviuses of indignation. Sure, they want their kids to learns the rudimentary mechanics of procreation, but they want it on THEIR terms. "Mommy Laid An Egg" is a very good example of a sex-ex text that's been banned from libraries, burned in bonfires, and generally demonized by those who see fit to dislike it. Obviously, becoming a banned book does not automatically make you worthwhile reading (just 99.9% of the time, really). When it comes to "Mommy Laid An Egg" debaters, they're usually split into two camps. You have the people who love its irreverence, its wit, and its light-hearted handling of a formerly overly serious subject. Then you have the people who point out that this book contains very little factual information, avoids correct biological terms like the plague, and has a gratuitous sequence that I once heard a librarian refer to as the, "kiddie-lit kama sutra". There's a third camp, I should note, that just hates the book because it talks about sex, but these are the kinds of people who seek out such books so as to hate them and, as such, will be duly ignored. So which of these two takes on the book is the correct one? To find that answer, you need to take a closer look at what, "Mommy Laid An Egg" is all about...

As a crazed assortment of kids, pets, and pillows camp out on the living room sofa, a mother and father (hippies to the core) come in and inform their offspring as to how babies are made. The sugar-hepped-up kids are game and suddenly hear a whole heaping helping of blarney from their beloved parental units.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. L. Rees on August 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
I thought this book was excellent. It's a great way to tell the children the facts of life in a fun way. I'm British, so maybe we view it differently over here?? [I'm going by some of the comments on past reviews.] But I would not hesitate in recommending this book to someone who wants to inform a young child about where babies come from. I'm a big believer in answering a child's questions in a simple form when they are young. I don't think we should leave it too late to inform them.
Lynette
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Kim on March 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be quite funny. The foundation of the book is about an expectant couple trying to explain, in the way they feel best, how babies are made...and it turns into the children telling the parents and drawing pictures of how they believe they are made. The words never rang truer for "Out of the mouths of babes!" I found this to be quite charming and am sure that children would find it easier to relate with it being told by other children as oppose to by adults. Perhaps my opinion will change should the day ever come that I need to explain this to my three year old, however I am sure I will look back to this book for some assistance. My opinion: the concern should not be to avoid embarassing the adults, the concern should be in keeping the lines of communication open with the children. They need to understand that they are allowed to ask questions and that they should expect to get legit answers.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
Maybe you have to be English, but I havn't laughed this hard over a book for at least a decade. This is not a book to teach children about sex, it's to show us adults how misunderstood and hilarious our lessons can become. I'm giving the book to all my friends who are starting families, as well as many who have been there, done that!
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31 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Constance P. Mccaslin on May 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Mommy Laid an Egg offers me the opportunity to explain reproduction--and the intricacies that surround it, such as how the egg is actually placed into mommy's uterus--exactly the way I would want a child to understand it...not too much, not too little. It walks the fine line between medical over-articulation, speculative "love talk" (ie: When a man loves a woman...), and baby talk. And best of all, it takes the approach that most children take on this subject--something they already knew. When the parents attempt to offer a childish explanation of where babies come from, the children offer their own explanation in their own language. Children will enjoy getting the upper hand, as the children in the story do. I highly recommend this to all like-minded parents.
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