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Momofuku Hardcover – September 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 303 pages
  • Publisher: Absolute (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906650357
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906650353
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (186 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,971,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

From Momofuku: Ginger Scallion Noodles and Ginger Scallion Sauce

Our ginger scallion noodles are an homage to/out-and-out rip-off of one of the greatest dishes in New York City: the $4.95 plate of ginger scallion noodles at Great New York Noodletown down on the Bowery in Chinatown.

Ginger scallion sauce is one of the greatest sauces or condiments ever. Ever. It’s definitely a mother sauce at Momofuku, something that we use over and over and over again. If you have ginger scallion sauce in the fridge, you will never go hungry: stir 6 tablespoons into a bowl of hot noodles--lo mein, rice noodles, Shanghai thick noodles--and you’re in business. Or serve over a bowl of rice topped with a fried egg. Or with grilled meat or any kind of seafood. Or almost anything.

At Noodle Bar, we add a few vegetables to the Noodletown dish to appease the vegetarians, add a little sherry vinegar to the sauce to cut the fat, and leave off the squirt of hoisin sauce that Noodletown finishes the noodles with. (Not because it’s a bad idea or anything, just that we’ve got hoisin in our pork buns, and too much hoisin in a meal can be too much of a good thing. Feel free to add it back.)

The dish goes something like this: boil 6 ounces of ramen noodles, drain, toss with 6 tablespoons Ginger Scallion Sauce (below); top the bowl with 1/4 cup each of Bamboo Shoots (page 54 of Momofuku); Quick-Pickled Cucumbers (page 65 of Momofuku); pan-roasted cauliflower (a little oil in a hot wide pan, 8 or so minutes over high heat, stirring occasionally, until the florets are dotted with brown and tender all the way through; season with salt); a pile of sliced scallions; and a sheet of toasted nori. But that’s because we’ve always got all that stuff on hand. Improvise to your needs, but know that you need ginger scallion sauce on your noodles, in your fridge, and in your life. For real.-- David Chang

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups thinly sliced scallions (greens and whites; from 1 to 2 large bunches)
  • 1/2 cup finely minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup grapeseed or other neutral oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons usukuchi (light soy sauce)
  • 3/4 teaspoon sherry vinegar
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste

(Makes about three cups)

Directions

Mix together the scallions, ginger, oil, soy, vinegar, and salt in a bowl. Taste and check for salt, adding more if needed. Though it’s best after 15 or 20 minutes of sitting, ginger scallion sauce is good from the minute it’s stirred together up to a day or two in the fridge. Use as directed, or apply as needed.


--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Chang, master restaurateur and chef, and Meehan, a New York Times food writer, join forces in this stellar collection of recipes from Chang's restaurants—Momofuku, Ssäm Bar and Ko. Chang is a man possessed with a deep love of ramen and a clear passion for food. This book pays tribute to the humble noodle, which Chang has elevated to a near art form, and the wide array of cuisine he serves. Filled with 150 gorgeous, full-color photos and an engrossing narrative, this book is a treat for the eye, mind and palate. Chang's special touches are seen in every dish. Chicken wings are cooked with bacon in rendered pork or duck fat, and pan-roasted asparagus are adorned with poached eggs and miso butter. Fried (or roasted) cauliflower is drizzled with fish sauce vinaigrette, and roasted New Jersey diver scallops are served with kohlrabi puree and iwa nori. Of course, recipes for noodles abound, including Momofuku ramen, ginger scallion noodles, and Alkaline Noodles. Other staples include ramen broth, ramen toppings, and rice with miso soup. Be forewarned: Chang gears the cookbook to only the most experienced of cooks, with many dishes requiring several steps. Nevertheless, Chang presents a collection both stunning and engaging. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

The recipes are there for the really adventurous home cooks.
Mizsak
I followed it by the book and ended up with something so good I had a hard time believing I had made it.
C. Rodriguez
This is a great book, it's well written and the recipes work out very fantastic.
Victor F. Mayoli

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

471 of 480 people found the following review helpful By C. Rodriguez on December 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought Momofuku a few weeks ago, after I heard an interview with the author on NPR. Coincidentally, my eleven year old daughter and I are going through a Ramen Noodles craze, inspired by Hayao Miyazaki's films (the grandfather in Whisper of the Heart serves noodles to the young ones when in distress; and in Ponyo the mom makes noodles look like magic).

In any case, I wanted something better than the packages available at the local Asian grocery store. Now, a month later, not only are my ramen noodles exquisite, but Momofuku has made me a much better cook. Here's why:
* Chang's attention to the quality of the ingredients one uses: I found a local farmer who raises pigs and drove an hour and a half on beautiful Oklahoma country roads to her place. My freezer is now packed with wonderful cuts of free ranging, non-chemical raised pork, stew meat, and bacon.
* His large quantities did not deter me. Actually, the book's advise on how to store food is perfect for my family of two. I made a huge pot of ramen noodle broth, let it reduce and once ready (simmered for 6 hours), stored in small containers in the freezer. Now I have absolutely wonderful broth for months. (Note: as a Colombian from the Andes, I don't want my broth to have any fishy flavor, so I excluded the Kombu from Chang's recipe)
* Chang's recipe for roasting pork is amazing too! I followed it by the book and ended up with something so good I had a hard time believing I had made it. I roasted a huge chunk of shoulder, and once ready and cool, shredded it, divided it in small zip lock bags, and to the freezer. As with the broth, I have excellent roasted pork to add to our weekly ramen noodles.
* Chang's creative techniques: I will never fry chicken any other way. Momofuku's recipe for fried chicken is exquisite.
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139 of 147 people found the following review helpful By Shirley Lee on December 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Genius. I NEVER would've thought cherry tomatoes and sesame oil went so well together!
Many of the recipes are time consuming. But it's care, quality and skill that makes good restaurants stand out. Momofuku's recipes certainly rule out the ordinary.
I am Chinese-American and make my soups by simmering bones for 6 hrs, that is what is takes - so David Chang's ramen broth is the real deal. This is the first I heard about adding tare, that must be the killer deal. No MSG here.

Some of the reviews scared me off at first but not all the recipes are difficult. I made the braised pork belly. Dude. This is an EASY recipe. Marinate w/salt & sugar overnight and stick it in the oven. Made the steam bun thing and all. Yummy, worthwhile and actually easy. Oh, and it's like one of their flagship dishes.

He is Korean-American and he actually made Kimchi better. I tried the nappa and cucumber kimchi and it rocks. So much better than the standard kimchi, it's got lots ginger, sugar and fish sauce too.
I don't think I'll ever play around with food glue or make deep fry pork rinds at home but this cookbook is not titled, 'home cookin momofuku'. It does, however, makes you appreciate what it takes to prepare their food.

This is a cookbook that requires some asian ingredients and cooking methods. So if you've never even purchased a chinese or korean cookbook or never made anything but a stir-fry, the recipes may seem daunting. If you don't make any of recipes, it teaches a few things and it's also a good read.

David Chang is a young, energetic and creative chef who takes you down the path of his success. He is very entertaining so it also fun to read (minus his expletives).
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86 of 91 people found the following review helpful By emmejay VINE VOICE on November 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I came to MOMOFUKU as a relatively beginning cook (despite my middle age) and an intermediate foodie, and suspected that the recipes from David Chang's acclaimed group of NYC restaurants would be over my head. I was right -- as they will be for all but the most adventurous and experienced cooks. But recipes aren't the only aspect to this book -- it's also a memoir of Chang's path from happy noodle-eater/unhappy office-worker through cooking school and apprenticeships to award-winning chef and restaurateur.

In fact, straightforward recipes are fairly rare in this book. Rather, they're tutorials -- each step is a paragraph about process and technique, and I'm already a better cook (and restaurant patron) just for having read them. The book itself is trademark Clarkson-Potter (think Barefoot Contessa and Martha Stewart books) -- smooth, heavy pages filled with full-color photographs of food, the restaurants, diners and staff -- many of which evoke a sense of motion and hectic energy. That energy is reinforced by Chang's conversational text, including profanity (which feels seamless and characterizing) and absolute gems of instruction. For example, for a pan-roasted rib eye (a do-able recipe), Chang advises to "Season the steak liberally with salt -- like you'd salt a sidewalk in New York in the winter," and, after cooking, to "Let the steak rest. Just leave it the hell alone"; about removing the fat from pigskin in the process of making pork rinds (*not* a do-able recipe): "Scrape gently but with determination."

Highly recommended for uber-motivated -- and armchair -- cooks.
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