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Fiat Money Inflation in France Paperback – 1959


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: FEE (1959)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0910614032
  • ISBN-13: 978-0910614030
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 5.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,199,272 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Learning about currency and monetary policy is a must.
christoper minka
It would have been an even better book if it dwelled on the politics of the times in France.
al estrada
Suggested reading for those not currently convinced that the money printers will save us.
William M.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 15, 1998
Format: Paperback
A clear presentation of a governments desparate move using cheap inflated paper money to pay off old debts and its effects on france around 1790. This is not a dynamic novel, but mind bombs go off as the author hits the chain of events that occurred when money is inflated, and is backed only by only a promise to pay the debt it represents. The French find themselves mired in a cycle of ever increasing difficulty to pay that debt off. Although it is not a novel and at times a bit dry, you will definitely be talking to your friends and family about what this author has to say and comparing it to what you see happening now.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Clark@xld.com on March 7, 1998
Format: Paperback
Short book by college history professor can be read in one sitting. Easy to read, holds your attention throughout. Reveals effects of inflation. Even though it is a tale of history 200 years ago, as it goes along, the parallels with present day inflation in the United States are striking. It describes how individuals in the various professions fare under runaway inflation and it reveals which profession fared best, but I won't spoil the book for you by telling you now. Useful info.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
Fiat Money Inflation in France is as much about irrational human behavior as it is about financial crises and runaway inflation. White describes a dissillusioned public who, under the influence of increasingly self-serving public officials and orators, accepted more and more assignant printings even though the perils of such printings had been documented throughout history and were then blatantly obvious right before there eyes.
White presented this analysis of the runaway inflation in France to dissuade the US Government of printing its own paper money. He was successful.
A book worth reading.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Marvin D. Pipher on July 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
This little book tells the epic tale of France's experiment with "irredeemable" currency (paper money which could not be redeemed for specie; gold or silver, i.e. "cash") from 1789-1796, and its devastating impact, particularly on the working class and those sent to the guillotine for violating various and sundry laws.

It should be required reading for every American, particularly congressmen and senators, for, although it was written almost one hundred years ago, the lessons it teaches are as applicable today as they have been all throughout man's history. It is obviously far too late for most nations to return to the gold standard, but this book also reveals the dangers inherent in a constantly and unlimited expansion of a nation's money supply. "Knowledge of the past," as Winston Churchill observed, "is the only foundation we have from which to peer into and measure the future." If so, the nations of the world ignore these lessons at their own peril, and so do their citizens.

So, if you'd like to know what might be down the road apiece, hopefully a very far piece, this is a good place to start. And, even if you don't make the connection, it certainly is an interesting story.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A. Kallmeyer on February 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
The book is about the financial trouble that fiat (e.g.,paper) money created in France during the revolutionary years. It also states clearly that the people didn't learn enough from a lesson they had 70 years early.
If you read this historical account you will very often wonder: 'Hey sounds familiar to me...'. Too bad - or?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Butler on March 22, 2012
Format: Paperback
Andrew Dickson White wrote this brief account of the disastrous inflationary policies of the French revolutionaries as a warning to those who believe that, once the money printing genie is out of the bottle, they can somehow find a way to put it back in. The early French revolutionaries were the best and brightest of the emerging French middle class. In principle, they should have been far more competent than the corrupt Bourbons. Yet they were seduced by the lure of money printing. White chronicles, step by step, the slippery slope of land and property securitisation which eventually led to a runaway inflation, economic collapse and the rise of a strongman--Napoleon Bonaparte--to sort out the mess. Along the way, he provides many observations on how the inflation led to a general rot of society, with speculation, rather than hard work, reaping the rewards. The German Weimar inflation may have been in some respects more spectacular, but the parallels are so obvious, right down to the emergence of the strongman and corruption of morals, that we should be in no doubt what lies in store for us if we choose to go down the same road again. The verdict of history is crystal clear on this point and this book is as good as any place to start for those who want to understand just how precarious our situation today has become.
John Butler, author of The Golden Revolution: How to Prepare for the Coming Global Gold Standard (John Wiley and Sons, 2012)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Windham Hillis on November 30, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is an interesting historical primer on the monetary policy of the French Revolution, and adds an economic dimension to the crisis that was largely overlooked in my high school study of the subject (as far as I can remember). My only complaint is that it becomes somewhat repetitive, since the French kept making the same mistake over, and over, and over, and over again. I'm not an "end the Fed" guy but this was a very insightful book for those worried about our monetary policy or just interested in economic history.
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