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Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution Paperback – March 10, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications (March 10, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0861715586
  • ISBN-13: 978-0861715589
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #520,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A work of deep and urgent relevance." (Ethan Nichtern, author of One City: A Declaration of Interdependence)

"I know of no other book that holds more promise for the survival and relevance of Buddhism in the modern world." (Lin Jensen, author of Pavement)

"This book is revolutionary! The clear and concise explanations of Buddhist perspectives on rarely approached topics such as sex, war, and money are an inspiration. If you are interested in personal or societal change, this is a book you need to read." (Noah Levine, author of Dharma Punx)

"Loy is a subversive, undermining our cherished opinions and revealing a revolutionary world of human possibility. He describes an emerging Buddhism that speaks to the Western heart and mind and offers hope in a world that has too little. Long live this revolution!" (James Ishmael Ford, author of If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break)

"David Loy's Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution might have a flashy title, but it is a serious and substantial book that poses real challenges to the reader. Loy argues with conviction that in order to have relevance in the West, the dharma must find the middle way between its many traditional Asian forms and the contemporary Western feel-good consumerism that characterize much of today's spiritualism." (Buddhadharma)

"For Loy, Buddhism is not just some gentle spiritual path; it's a tool for social criticism and change. But the revolutionary sword cuts both ways, and just as the West needs Buddhism, says Loy, a living, vital Buddhism also needs the West." (Shambhala Sun)

"Loy's thought provoking book has wide appeal: for people not so familiar with Buddhist thought and practice his emphasis is on why this 2500 year old religion is relevant today. For seasoned Buddhist practitioners, the book keeps us from thinking too small. Loy's analysis is a challenge to practice in the world wholeheartedly." (Mountain Record)

"David Loy's is an urgent and vital voice in the Buddhist world, and his latest work is a passionate and bold survey of some of the big issues that face us individually and collectively. This thoughtful, probing work warrants the attention of anyone interested in creative change on either an individual or social level. I strongly recommend it." (Western Buddhist Review)

"Direct, articulate, and profound. David R. Loy succinctly analyzes primary areas of our collective modern entanglements with suffering: consumerism, money values, ecological collapse, sexuality, relationships, time, language, identity, godlessness and the commodification of consciousness. In each case he brings to bear the core teachings of the Buddha in profound, up-to-date reflections on our collective situation." (Inquiring Mind)

About the Author

David R. Loy's previous books include the acclaimed Money, Sex, War, Karma, The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, and The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons, a finalist for the 2006 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award. He was the Besl Professor of Ethics/Religion and Society at Cincinnati's Xavier University.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Dustin G. Rhodes VINE VOICE on July 29, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I do not call myself a Buddhist, but that's certainly not because I haven't felt an almost life-long calling towards its teachings. I don't call myself a Buddhist because I am unsure of religion's place and legitimacy in the modern world. Religion, even dear Buddhism, seems divisive and small-minded, so I resist.

Money Sex War Karma, first and foremost, is an insightful, well-written and suprisingly critical look at Buddhism. I found the short book completely riveting and full of useful criticism. As a person who has always been interested in the teachings of the Buddha and never in the religion of Buddhism, this book articulated many vague notions that have been swirling around in my head for many, many years. How refreshing to see one of Buddhism's own teachers and practitioners offer such an insightful and well-reasonable approach to finding an authentic Buddhist path. Loy's analysis has the potential to make Buddhist teachings not only relevant to the 21st century, but indispensable.

These essays possess the wisdom to help transform not only one's day to day practice, but Buddhism as an institution. Buddhists are wise to pay attention to Loy's sage and sane words.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Douglas King VINE VOICE on November 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
A lot of books about Buddhism deal with concepts on a very personal level. Although one of the goals of "awakening" is to benefit all sentient beings, exactly how an "awakened" being can benefit a society in turmoil is not often discussed in a practical, realistic way. Conversely, when discussing the false perceptions that cause humans to suffer, most books about Buddhism deal with this in a very individual way, as opposed to discussing how human delusion causes problems in our collective consciousness, aka human society.

"Money Sex War Karma" tries to tackle the effects of human delusion on a societal, even global scale, and tries to posit how principals of Buddhism can help bring some healing and peace to a very sick world. Clearly, this is a huge undertaking, and you could make the argument that the author bit off more than he could possibly chew. Well, so what? If the point of Buddhism is, ultimately, to wake up from our suffering, deluded state and benefit the world around us, isn't it time someone started talking about the possible ways to do that?

One of the more interesting discussions in the book involves comparing the "three poisons" of Buddhist philosophy (greed, ill will, delusion) with three major human institutions that serve as direct manifestations of it (corporations, the military, and the media, respectively). Critics may call David Loy's essays naive, simplistic, liberal, or worse, but I'd prefer the dialog he is trying to perpetuate to the snarky, finger-pointing childishness that passes for most discourse.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jane Fried on September 1, 2008
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You are always more than you think and less than you think. This is a brilliant analysis of the relationships between individual virtues and social institutions. Very thought provoking.If the world isn't working for you and you want to know what you can do personally, this book gives you a lot to think about.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kozen on January 15, 2013
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While I did not agree with everything the author said, it did get me thinking about a lot of issues. I am grateful to the author's good grasp of Buddhist practice and philosophy and have given the book to many of my friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kyle T. on September 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The points made are very good. If one is a beginner, then this book may seem to be a true eye opener. If more experienced with some Buddhist ways, this begins to get reduntant.

I feel like he uses 10 words when only 4 are needed.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lovetree on September 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
The sensational title, Money Sex War and Karma, belies a scholarly work of the first magnitude; an incisive down-to-earth Buddhist-based critique of our troubled culture as it wanders in samsara - confused, bewildered, ig-norant, and delusional.
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