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136 of 146 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back Office Baseball: A Smart Screenplay And Grounded Performances Showcase The Business Of The Game
Every year, I get wary of the inevitable film set in a sporting arena where an underdog player or team must triumph against adversity to become unlikely heroes. As accomplished or heartwarming as many of these films can be, they never seem to be able to break free of the conventions that we've all seen a hundred times. While I can't say that "Moneyball" isn't inspired...
Published on December 7, 2011 by K. Harris

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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, but the Story Is Not Well-Served by This Hackneyed Plot.
"Moneyball", based on Michael Lewis' book of the same name, follows the 2002 season of baseball's Oakland Athletics, behind the scenes, as General Manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) meets a lot of resistance to his new strategy. In an effort to put together a winning team on a paltry budget, Beane has taken the advice of his new Assistant Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), a...
Published on January 22, 2012 by mirasreviews


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136 of 146 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back Office Baseball: A Smart Screenplay And Grounded Performances Showcase The Business Of The Game, December 7, 2011
Every year, I get wary of the inevitable film set in a sporting arena where an underdog player or team must triumph against adversity to become unlikely heroes. As accomplished or heartwarming as many of these films can be, they never seem to be able to break free of the conventions that we've all seen a hundred times. While I can't say that "Moneyball" isn't inspired by the genre, I will say that it looks at the phenomenon from a decidedly different angle. Based on Michael Lewis's non-fiction account of the same name, this is actually an intriguing story ruled by the business of baseball as opposed to the emotions the game elicits. As such, it seems like something entirely new. Director Bennett Miller (Oscar nominee for Capote), along with heavyweight screenwriters Aaron Sorkin and Steve Zaillian, has created one of the brainiest and least sentimental baseball films you're likely to see. "Moneyball" tells the true story of how the Oakland A's GM Billy Beane rebuilt the team for the 2002 season with enormous financial constraints using computer analysis and statistics. While admittedly, this might not sound like a particularly sexy plot--it was a pivotal moment in sporting history well worth documenting. And despite knowing the outcome, the film is never less than fascinating.

"Moneyball" refers to the inherent unfairness in the sport as teams with deep pockets can rule the game by outspending their smaller competitors when selecting the top tier players. When Oakland lost its powerhouse line-up, the team was left scrambling for replacements. Eschewing traditional recruitment methods, Beane (Brad Pitt) placed his trust in a new assistant (Jonah Hill) that had a new way of looking at statistics to determine the game's most undervalued players. Against all advice, he assembled a team of misfits that no one thought could succeed--including his own manager (Philip Seymour Hoffman) who constantly challenged and opposed Beane. What happens at the start of the season only cements the team as a league (and national) laughingstock and has the country thirsting for Beane's sacrificial blood. But against all odds, things start to gel and history is made.

Pitt plays Beane with a world-weary grace. It may, in fact, be his most grounded performance to date. Aloof at first, we see how he thaws to his own superstitions to become an invaluable part of the club. Through flashbacks and interludes with his daughter, we see different sides of a man who has dedicated his life to the sport. Jonah Hill plays it straight as the assistant who is instrumental to the team's new direction. Hill is surprisingly good, deadpan even, and he and Pitt develop a chemistry that is as unlikely as it is effective. Hoffman has a small, but vital, role and is spot-on. The actors that comprise the team all turn in solid work as well, but fundamentally this is Pitt's picture from start to finish. And understatement is the name of the game. A smart screenplay, an interesting topic, effective performances--it's all handled with a refreshing minimum of schmaltz (a key element in many sport's films). By tackling the back office side of baseball, "Moneyball" sets itself apart as a true original. A film that doesn't just love the game, but really understands it (foibles and all). A rarity and a surprisingly adult entertainment, about 4 1/2 stars. KGHarris, 12/11.
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inexplicably great movie, even for baseball dummies, January 19, 2012
I really don't understand baseball. Like it, but don't really understand it. I can watch the game and understand superficially what's happening, but I don't get the strategy and, of course, it's all strategy. So, I went to see this in the theater and loved it and then just rewatched the blu-ray. Loved it, and only partly understand why. One thing: You can't take your eyes of Brad Pitt. Not because of his good looks, but because he's just utterly charismatic and engaging. Jonah Hill is an unexpected but perfect casting choice. But, overall, it's a tribute to the filmmakers that a movie that shouldn't work this well works this well.
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39 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The business of baseball, November 29, 2011
By 
This review is from: Moneyball (DVD)
"Moneyball" is based on true events, and provides valuable insight regarding the on-field and off-field dynamics of the Oakland A's Major League Baseball Club.

This film has the capacity to engage viewers who are familiar or unfamiliar with the sport, based on the avant-garde approach to managing resources that is utilised by Billy Beane (Brad Pitt), which any person in business can appreciate.

The narrative is also inspiring, as the viewer is presented with what seems like impossible circumstances for the A's to be successful, yet through innovative thinking high performance is achieved.

Brad Pitt provides a solid performance, as does the entire cast, and the viewer is entertained with plenty of humour and quality drama.

This movie is a win for baseball, as it has the capacity to introduce new people to the game from all over the world.

Nicholas R.W. Henning - Australian Baseball Author
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War Between Intuition and Statistics, January 12, 2012
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This review is from: Moneyball (DVD)
For those of us who love baseball, and even for those who don't, this is a wondeful 'feel good' film of statistics and brains versus intuition and brawn.

We find Billy Beane, played by Brad Pitt, GM of the Oakland Athletics, making it to the World Series but failing to win. In the process the team is losing three of its best players. The Athletics have a thirty million dollar cap on their players versus the Red Sox and New York Yanklees, who have hundreds of millions. Beane needs to replace these players, but the members of his scouting teams just give him the same old tired story of the players that will probably work out with practice. Beane wants another method to pick his players. At a meeting with another team he finds a young, short, chubby man, Peter Brand, played by Jonah Hill, who spouts statistics and crunched numbers to arrive at an algorithm for players who will do well. He hires Brand and changes his methods and that of his team.

Brand is a nerdy Yale graduate who looked at the strict cost-benefit analysis of baseball players. He persuaded Beane that he should hire based on key performance statistics that pointed to undervalued players. They assembled a team that seemed foolhardy at first, but during the course of a season, proved itself the biggest bargain in baseball. Beane antagonized most of his scouts, but he was proved correct. At the end of the season he is invited to Boston to meet the Red Sox owner. When he returns to Oakland he talks with Brand, and tells him, "I don't play for money, I play for the love of the game". Oh, yes, the love of what you are doing. A lucky man and one who knows and is happy with himself. A loner, a divorced man with a daughter he loves, but all in all a man who is fine living alone.

This is not just a film for baseball lovers, but a film for all of us who can see that a new way, a change from the old ways is almost always a good thing.

Highly Recommended, prisrob 01-12-12

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even non-baseball fans will love this heartfelt film, September 30, 2011
Every once in awhile, there is a great sports movie that comes out that appeals to fans of the sport and non-fans alike. I've never been a great baseball fan, but I was dragged to this movie with low expectations. When I left, I realized just how blown away I was. The cast displays great chemistry and the performances are excellent all around, with only a few missteps exhibited by the script. Jonah Hill's performance here is probably the best of his career, augmented by Brad Pitt's stellar portrayal of Billy Beane.

Moneyball follows a true story of a horrible MLB team and the general manager who reinvents his team from scratch. Putting together a ragtag assortment of players and personnel, Beane has to deal with challenges from those around him and observers who call his methods and his goals wrong and against what baseball is about. It's a touching story complete with laughs and moments where you are rooting for the A's, fan or not.

The movie is like a love story to baseball and the things that make the sport so great. Pitt's performance should hopefully score him a nomination in the Oscar races, pulling so much from his bag of tricks to give a winning performance. Jonah Hill should be proud of himself for what he proved to the world in this movie, that he isn't just about juvenile jokes and high school humor - even if some does factor into Moneyball. Some. The writing and direction are superb. I was a big fan of The Social Network and was immediately pulled in by the story in Moneyball. Beane's story and the story of those around him is harrowing and pulling, and they did an excellent job of conveying how important heart and soul are in a world of tradition and rules.

If I have to nitpick one thing about the movie, it would be the length. Cutting a few minutes off this 2+ hour film would have served to tighten it up, but I am not really complaining. To convince a non-baseball fan like me that this was an excellent movie is hard, but Moneyball did this and then some. This movie is definitely a must see.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back Office Baseball: A Smart Screenplay And Grounded Performances Showcase The Business Of The Game, January 26, 2012
Note: This 3 disc set was exclusive to Walmart. The Blu-Ray and DVD have the same features as those you'd purchase elsewhere, but this adds a Bonus DVD containing "Studio 42 With Bob Costas" as seen on MLB Network, Featuring a 45 Minute Interview with Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill, Billy Beane and Michael Lewis.

Every year, I get wary of the inevitable film set in a sporting arena where an underdog player or team must triumph against adversity to become unlikely heroes. As accomplished or heartwarming as many of these films can be, they never seem to be able to break free of the conventions that we've all seen a hundred times. While I can't say that "Moneyball" isn't inspired by the genre, I will say that it looks at the phenomenon from a decidedly different angle. Based on Michael Lewis's non-fiction account of the same name, this is actually an intriguing story ruled by the business of baseball as opposed to the emotions the game elicits. As such, it seems like something entirely new. Director Bennett Miller (Oscar nominee for Capote), along with heavyweight screenwriters Aaron Sorkin and Steve Zaillian, has created one of the brainiest and least sentimental baseball films you're likely to see. "Moneyball" tells the true story of how the Oakland A's GM Billy Beane rebuilt the team for the 2002 season with enormous financial constraints using computer analysis and statistics. While admittedly, this might not sound like a particularly sexy plot--it was a pivotal moment in sporting history well worth documenting. And despite knowing the outcome, the film is never less than fascinating.

"Moneyball" refers to the inherent unfairness in the sport as teams with deep pockets can rule the game by outspending their smaller competitors when selecting the top tier players. When Oakland lost its powerhouse line-up, the team was left scrambling for replacements. Eschewing traditional recruitment methods, Beane (Brad Pitt) placed his trust in a new assistant (Jonah Hill) that had a new way of looking at statistics to determine the game's most undervalued players. Against all advice, he assembled a team of misfits that no one thought could succeed--including his own manager (Philip Seymour Hoffman) who constantly challenged and opposed Beane. What happens at the start of the season only cements the team as a league (and national) laughingstock and has the country thirsting for Beane's sacrificial blood. But against all odds, things start to gel and history is made.

Pitt plays Beane with a world-weary grace. It may, in fact, be his most grounded performance to date. Aloof at first, we see how he thaws to his own superstitions to become an invaluable part of the club. Through flashbacks and interludes with his daughter, we see different sides of a man who has dedicated his life to the sport. Jonah Hill plays it straight as the assistant who is instrumental to the team's new direction. Hill is surprisingly good, deadpan even, and he and Pitt develop a chemistry that is as unlikely as it is effective. Hoffman has a small, but vital, role and is spot-on. The actors that comprise the team all turn in solid work as well, but fundamentally this is Pitt's picture from start to finish. And understatement is the name of the game. A smart screenplay, an interesting topic, effective performances--it's all handled with a refreshing minimum of schmaltz (a key element in many sport's films). By tackling the back office side of baseball, "Moneyball" sets itself apart as a true original. A film that doesn't just love the game, but really understands it (foibles and all). A rarity and a surprisingly adult entertainment, about 4 1/2 stars.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Movie, but leaves out a few things, January 17, 2012
This review is from: Moneyball (DVD)
As mentioned by my title this is a good movie and a must see for baseball fans. "Moneyball" chronicles the 2002 Oakland Athletics with their no-nonsense, savvy General Manager Billy Beane played by Brad Pitt, A's manager Art Howe played by Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Jonah Hill also plays as Billy Beane's genius assistant Peter Brandt. The movie begins when the Oakland A's lose in the playoffs after the 2001 season, not to mention they also lose their two highest priced talented players Jason Giambi and Johnny Damon. Since Oakland does not have the money the money to compete with the big boys(Yankees, Red Sox), Billy Beane must make do with players who weren't highly sought after.
Here's what the movie fails to mention the A's had offensive power hitter Miguel Tejada(won MVP in 2002), the A's also had 3 Cy Young caliber pitchers( Tim Hudson, Mark Mulder, Barry Zito) Zito won the Cy Young in 2002. The movie makes no reference to them. The A's beat the odds and win 100 games in 2002 to make the playoffs.
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50 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Great Baseball Films, November 14, 2011
By 
I love baseball. Played 14 seasons growing up. Even helped win some championships. Batting was always my favorite. There's nothing more intense than standing there, staring down the pitcher, bat twisting between your palms, waiting for the ball to come whipping out of that hand at insane speeds. Fielding was good too. I mostly played pitcher, first, second, shortstop, third, left, right, and center. Plus, when my dad was the manager, every night he'd look over all of the players' stats with me and spend hours agonizing over how to arrange the team to create the perfect fun/success ratio.

What I'm saying is, I know a thing or two about baseball, so when I go to a movie on the subject, I expect a lot, and if they don't get it right, I'll tear into it with a passion.

They got it right.

But then again, it almost wasn't a baseball movie. Brad Pitt plays Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane at a time when the team's just lost its three star players. Faced with the difficulty of getting new hotshots on a bare bones budget, Beane turns to economy major Peter Brand (Jonah Hill). Brand convinces Beane that stars don't win games. Runs win games, and runs aren't scored with big hits and amazing plays in the field. They're scored by getting on base.

Beane takes this advice to heart and throws out all the conventional wisdom of baseball sages, willing to hire players who don't know anything about fielding as long as they can take pitches and end up with a walk. Most of the film is about people who think they know baseball not believing in this new system and Beane trying to stick with it in the face of early failure. Like I said, it's not a baseball movie.

But The Social Network was a movie about computer programming, and if they can make that exciting, I guess they can do it with anything. Brad Pitt helps with a great performance as the conflicted manager, and Jonah Hill is surprisingly good. The success of the film rests squarely on their shoulders, and while shots of endless statistics scrolling across a computer screen are a little cheesy, they're not that bad. As the film builds up the hopelessness of being such a monetarily poor team, you can't help but root for them. Right from the beginning, you'll be emotionally hooked, and it won't let up until the very end.

One of the cool differences about this underdog story is that the characters aren't stars. The power wasn't inside them all along. Instead, you're rooting for the players to get walks, to get hit by pitches, to hit scrappy singles, to allow runs to score on a bunt and take the easy out. The movie gets around this by making the climax not about a championship, but about the potential for a record-breaking winning streak, and man is it exciting.

Another key difference is that, for something advertised as a pure sports drama, it's surprisingly funny. I think I laughed harder at this than at The Hangover 2. In fact, I think it's the funniest movie I've been to this year.

This movie makes you believe. It's makes you believe on the same level as Remember the Titans or any of the great sports movies, except you believe not in the players, but in the power of statistics, and for some reason you care. When the other characters in the film refuse to believe, when they work at every opportunity to undermine and diminish our hero, Statistics, you want to punch them in their grubby little faces. I love when a film can really make me despise somebody, and Moneyball pulls it off.

If you love baseball or Brad Pitt or sports movies or economics or feeling emotions or laughing or good cinema in general, go see this movie. It's worth your time.
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, but the Story Is Not Well-Served by This Hackneyed Plot., January 22, 2012
This review is from: Moneyball (DVD)
"Moneyball", based on Michael Lewis' book of the same name, follows the 2002 season of baseball's Oakland Athletics, behind the scenes, as General Manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) meets a lot of resistance to his new strategy. In an effort to put together a winning team on a paltry budget, Beane has taken the advice of his new Assistant Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), a Yale-educated statistician, and decided to choose players strictly by the numbers. He looks for players who have particular talents but whom other teams have undervalued, so he can pick them up cheap. The team's talent scouts take a dim view of the project, and the team's manager Art Howe (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is downright uncooperative.

Michael Lewis was interested in Billy Beane's story, because it paralleled the shift from old-school experience and intuition to quantitatively-motivated decision-making that Lewis experienced on Wall Street in the 1980s and wrote about in his breakthrough book "Liar's Poker". Billy Beane taught baseball that it was choosing players the wrong way, and his "sabermetric", or quantitative, approach has gained considerable following since. The name of his assistant who crunched all the numbers in real life was Paul DePodesta, and he was educated at Harvard, not Yale. The methods they used were based on the work of Bill James, who pioneered the statistical approach to baseball in the 1980s.

Unfortunately, screenwriters Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin played it safe by including irrelevant, saccharine tidbits about Billy Beane's relationship with his 12-year-old daughter in order to "connect" with the audience or to "humanize" him or some such nonsense. This extraneous material only serves to make the movie too long. The writers use a classic underdog sports team structure, which is awkward, because the battle is not being waged by players on the baseball diamond, but rather between recruitment philosophies behind the scenes. Sorkin and Zaillian have plugged a story that is not about human relationships or underdogs into a paint-by-numbers plot that is.

"Moneyball" would have done better to focus on the implications of the conflict between statistical analyses and the Old School, as this battle has been waged in many professions in recent decades. The fact that it reached professional sports, with its deeply entrenched traditions and market that thrives on nostalgia, shows how radically business culture has changed. But the filmmakers take a conventional approach, presumably to appeal to a wider audience. The writers sidestep the real conflict in favor of predictable filler. They dumb it down. It's an entertaining film but would have been a lot better had the writers done some writing instead of plugging the story into a pre-fab plot.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top-notch sports drama, June 26, 2012
By 
This review is from: Moneyball (DVD)
Billy Beane has a problem. As general manager for the cash-strapped Oakland A's, Beane is having a hard time recruiting quality players, mainly because, with the limited budget the owner has given him to work with, he can't possibly compete with the multimillion dollar contracts being proffered by A-tier teams like the Yankees and the Red Sox. To add insult to injury, those teams keep pilfering the few decent players Beane's already got. Into the breach steps Peter Brand, a 23-year-old numbers-cruncher straight out of Yale who's devised a complex algorithm out of players' statistics that will allow recruiters to focus in on the less obviously flashy - and thereby far less expensive - players whom the Big Boy franchises have managed to overlook. The skeptics question the wisdom and efficacy of reducing team-building to mere mathematic formulas and science, but Brand's method winds up working so well that it forever revolutionizes the way major league baseball teams recruit their players.

Based on the 2003 book by Michael Lewis, with screenplay by Steve Zaillion and Aaron Sorkin and direction by Bennett Miller, "Moneyball" provides a literal inside-baseball glimpse into the inside of baseball. In many ways, "Moneyball" is a kind of grownup version of "The Bad News Bears" and every other tale of a coach who pulls together a motley crew of misfits and second-stringers and, against all odds, transforms them into a winning team. The difference is that this story has actual history behind it, recounting the 2002 season in which the A`s won a record 20 games in a row (yet still lost in the playoffs). Plus, the movie finds its drama more in the behind-the-scenes wrangling among the highly skeptical managers, owners, coaches and staff than in the action on the field (indeed, most of the ballpark scenes appear as grainy clips from actual games). The intelligent screenplay avoids most of the clichés inherent in the genre - and those it doesn't avoid it somehow manages to make seem fresh and vital again. The writing also adds depth and dimension to Beane's character by occasionally flashing back to his own somewhat underwhelming career as a player in the big leagues, showing how that disappointment helped to mold him into the man he is today.

Despite the sterling quality of the writing and direction, "Moneyball" is clearly an actors' picture, and the filmmakers have recruited a first-rate cast to carry out the drama (I wonder if they used a similar algorithm for that). Brad Pitt has probably never been better than he is here as the Quixotic visionary who's such a bundle of nerves that he can't even bring himself to watch his own games. A mixture of pragmatist and romantic when it comes to the game of baseball, Beane is the perfect person to serve as iconoclast for a game whose roots lie deep in the American psyche but a game that has lost its way in recent times with its huge salaries and uncompetitive money advantages among teams. Jonah Hill is excellent as Brand, as is Philip Seymour Hoffman as Art Howe, the A's highly skeptical and understandably disgruntled manager, who initially balks at what he believes is the disastrous direction in which Beane is taking the team. Chris Pratt ("Everwood," "Parks and Recreation") and Kerris Dorsey ("Parenthood") also score in small but important roles.

There's drama and suspense aplenty in this film, with literal edge-of-the-seat excitement generated by its re-creation of the nail-biting 20th game that got the A`s into the record books. But "Moneyball" never overplays its hand, never indulges in corny melodramatics or cheap sentiment to win us over to its side. In fact, it is its very restraint and subtlety - both in performance and execution - that draws us so deeply into the tale it's telling.
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