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Monsieur Ibrahim


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DVD 1-Disc Version
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Product Details

  • Actors: Omar Sharif, Pierre Boulanger, Gilbert Melki, Isabelle Renauld, Lola Naymark
  • Directors: François Dupeyron
  • Writers: François Dupeyron, Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
  • Producers: Laurent Pétin, Michèle Pétin
  • Format: AC-3, Color, Dolby, Letterboxed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: French (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, Portuguese
  • Region: Region 1 encoding (US and Canada only)
    PLEASE NOTE:
    Some Region 1 DVDs may contain Regional Coding Enhancement (RCE). Some, but not all, of our international customers have had problems playing these enhanced discs on what are called "region-free" DVD players. For more information on RCE, click .
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: July 6, 2004
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00023GG6C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #179,372 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Monsieur Ibrahim" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Screen legend Omar Sharif (Hidalgo, and such classics as Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago) is Monsieur Ibrahim, an elderly widower who owns a grocery store in a shabby, working-class section of Paris. His life takes on new meaning when he befriends Momo, a lonely teenage boy (Pierre Boulanger). In Ibrahim, Momo finds the father he never had, a patient man infused with kindness and a wisdomthat he freely shares. And Momo awakens within Ibrahim a taste for grand adventure, which takes them on a journey that will change their lives forever.

Amazon.com

Some crowded Parisian atmosphere and the burnished presence of Omar Sharif make this coming-of-age tale a pleasure. It's the early 1960s, and an adolescent Jewish boy (Pierre Boulanger), mostly left to his own devices by an ineffectual father, makes friends with the worldly wise Persian man (Sharif) who runs a small neighborhood grocery. The kid's fumbling experiences with sexual curiosity are the reliable stuff of many a French movie, but the unlikely friendship of young Jew and old Muslim make for an offbeat through-line. Francois Dupeyron's film shifts gears in its final section, moving from its flavorful location and into the wide-open spaces, and it goes on too long with too many pieces of advice. But overall this is a warm and winning experience, with Omar Sharif holding an instructive class in the power of understated movie-star charisma. --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews

The ending, however, is a bit sad and may be too much for some kids.
"moviewatcher23838"
He is very rarely off screen, and he rivets our attention on his character in a way that most highly paid movie actors can merely dream about doing.
Roland E. Zwick
The boy needed a father figure, and the man needed the company and love of a child.
Frenchrunner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Roland E. Zwick on October 10, 2004
Format: DVD
"Monsieur Ibrahim" is a fine coming-of-age tale set in 1960's Paris. Young Pierre Boulanger gives a remarkably assured performance as Moses, a Jewish teen living with his cold, skinflint of a dad in a less-than-savory part of town. Abandoned by his mother and living in the shadow of a brother who has himself fled the scene, Moses leads an embittered existence, seeking surcease in the beds of the local prostitutes who ply their trade on the street where he lives. Moses is finally befriended by an aged shopkeeper named Ibrahim Demirdji, a Safi Muslim who, after Moses' father commits suicide, adopts the boy and instills in him valuable life lessons, gleaned from his religious training and his long years of experience.

In terms of its storyline, "Monsieur Ibrahim" offers little that is new here (the idea of an older mentor figure raising an orphan child of a different religion goes at least as far back as "The Two of Us" in 1968 and probably much further) . Where it excels is in its tenderhearted view of daily life and in its subtle plea for understanding between Arab and Jew. Moses is an almost heartbreakingly ordinary kid, a fact which makes his story all the more compelling (he has much of the rough-and-tumble poignancy of the boy in "The 400 Blows"). We can identify with every emotion he is going through on his painful journey to adulthood: his fears, his insecurities, his need for acceptance, his appreciation of simple kindnesses. Moses lives in a world where life can sometimes be cruel, but where fellow human beings reach out to help one another in their moments of greatest need.

This is a beautiful, heartfelt film that doesn't stand on its head to try and impress us.
Read more ›
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 8, 2004
Format: DVD
MONSIEUR IBRAHIM AND THE FLOWERS OF THE KORAN is an exquisite little film. The story is rather simple on the surface: a 16 year old Jewish boy (Moses Schmitt in an extraordinary portrayal by Pierre Boulanger) is coming of age on Blue Street in Paris (a street that features prostitutes plying their wares) in the late 1950s - early 1960s. His mother deserted both his distant and damaged father (Gilbert Melki) and Moses very early in life and Moses must find his way into adulthood on his own - until he gets to know the 'Arab' (actually an elder Muslim) at the corner grocery (Monsieur Ibrahim brilliantly brought to glowing life by Omar Sharif). To survive, Moses 'shoplifts' food until M. Ibrahim tells him to take what he wants, knowing that his father deprives him of nearly everything. The old man is as gentle and calm and serene ("I know what is in my Koran") as Moses is angry and eager to taste life. Moses uses saved pennies to buy his first sexual encounter with one of the prostitutes and is gradually befriended by many of the 'heart of gold' streetwalkers. Slowly Moses and M. Ibrahim are bond and when Moses' father deserts him and commits suicide, M. Ibrahim adopts him, buys a sporty little car and the two are off on a road trip to Turkey (Ibrahim's Persian home). As the two bond the boy learns much from the spiritually aware old man and we, as the observers, learn much about the differences and similarities of Judaism, Islam, pantheism, and all manifestations of spirtuality. The ending is somewhat predictable but that doesn't diminish the impact of the film. This burnished atmosphere of trust and love is magic in the hands of Director Francois Dupeyron and the performances by Sharif and Boulanger are beautifully nuanced and understated.Read more ›
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Hulka on November 6, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a sweet story about a topic that is often ignored, how boys need stable men in their lives to become men themselves. It is also a positive portrayal of the religion of Islam. The sweet tale has such a positive message and sympathetic characters, that I ended up watching it several times. It's too bad it has an "R" rating, as that will prevent it's being seen by a wider audience.

Omar Sharif is the mentor, a lonely old man who befriends a neighborhood boy without a father figure, and saves him from the street life which is the boy would otherwise be destined. The young actor, Pierre Boulanger is an extremely attractive young man in the dazzling bloom of youth, whose contrast to Sharif as the grizzled, lonely old man provides a wonderful chemistry at the heart of his tale.

The fact that the young man is Jewish underlines the message about the nature of Islam as a positive forgiving religion.

This is a low budget film, but it's crafted so well, with such heart and taste, that it proves that big money is not necessary to make big movies. The only disappointment I have is the ending is little bit of a letdown, but otherwise this is a wonderful little film, and highly recommended, even for a young adult. (NOTE: the R rating is because of the portray of prostitution, the 'street life' that threatens the young man before the old man enters his life.)
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Caesar M. Warrington on May 1, 2006
Format: DVD
A wonderful and warm hearted story about a neglected boy coming of age in 1960's Paris.

Pierre Boulanger plays Moises, a teenaged Jewish boy who was abandoned by his mother and is ignored by his father, who also soon runs out on him. Living on a dreary street, surrounded by prostitutes and spending too much time on his own, Moises is befriended by Ibrahim (Omar Sharif), a Turkish grocer who becomes the much needed father-figure for the boy. With his Sufi background Ibrahim teaches Moises (who he renames Momo) the necessity and divinity of love and the awesome beauty of this world.
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