Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

216 of 219 people found the following review helpful
on April 9, 2010
I had purposely avoided writing or giving a review to the seller in July of 2009 because I honestly had nothing to say. I cannot review a product I havent really put to the test. Back in July 2009 I ordered about 5 or 8 of these HDMI cables. I had just purchased my Samsung LCD, as well as the entire entertainment center (blu ray, HDMI receiver, PS3, Xbox360, etc) all at once (bought a new condo). When I saw the price of these cables at Best Buy I flipped. Figured Id try the cheapie solution first. Whats the worst that could happen? Id end up losing like $10.00. Who cares.

First I did research on "Brand Name" cables vs cheap ones. Everyone pretty much seems to agree they are all the same except that brand name has amazing marketing and publicity.

I received the cables fairly quickly, they come in cheap plastic baggies. I was excited to use my new TV and the whole shebang and truly hoped these would work as the alternative was spending $500 or so on what I thought were "real cables". I hooked everything up and everything worked fine, no problems, no glitches, no fuzzy or grainy pics, sound quality is amazing (I have a $1200 Klipsch Sound System and a $600 Sony Receiver). I honestly figured the cables would eventually stop working and that Id eventually have to invest in real ones. Well, the other day (its now April 2010) the maintenance guy in my building mentioned buying an LCD TV and that he wasn't sure what to do, as he couldn't afford the $150 Monster Cables. I suggested Amazon.com and told him to look for Eforcity first or Abacus 24-7 (Another great cable seller on here) and this is how I remembered to finally write my review.

10 months later, cables have worked like a charm and you know what? Even if they stopped working now, Id order $10 dollars more and just replace all of them. You are probably wondering why theres a $100 dollar difference between the ones at the store and the ones here... its called "Sorry sucker, you've just been ripped off!"

Kudos to Amazon.com for offering vendors like this guy and I will certainly continue to purchase any cables off of him / them.

Cheers.
88 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1,134 of 1,190 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon November 29, 2007
Very recently, I purchased a television at Best Buy. They don't sell the $5 and $10 HDMI cables you find at Fry's or on Amazon, so I went ahead and bought this cable.

I thought I wouldn't mind, after all I spent thousands on the TV, but it kept nagging me. So I bought a $2 HDMI cable from Amazon (search for HDMI and you'll see a few brands). My TV has twin HDMI inputs, so I hooked up this cable and the Monster cable, put on Casino Royale, and flipped between the cables to see what the difference was.

There was absolutely no difference. None at all. I figured the picture would be slightly sharper or the colors cleaner, but you could put a gun to my head and I wouldn't be able to tell you which was which.

And I googled HDMI and learned that if your video and audio signals work at all, then the signal is being carried correctly. There is no middle ground with HDMI. Better cables do not incrementally improve picture quality! Why? Because the HDMI is digital, and it's very difficult to distort a 1 into a 0. In fact, it's technically impossible without total signal distortion or failure. Failure in signal is caused by processors or cables that are too long. Or more likely, misconfigured systems. With digital signals, the cables have a much easier job. Imagine if you had to read a book from 100 yards away? That's analog. Imagine reading morse code from a flashlight at 100yards away (and you know morse cose)? That's digital.

So by buying this cable, you are insuring yourself that if your cable length is at the extreme, or if your house gets hit by an EMP, that this monster cable will shield that digital signal quite a bit better than the cheap cable. Why not pay $2 and see if that kind of insurance is necessary? After all, if the $2 cable works, it's not going to get better.

It's repulsive that Best Buy only sells extremely expensive cables. I'm glad Amazon gives me the choice. Don't be naive! Give the cheap cable a try! One word of caution: if you require HDMI 1.3a, get a compatible cable. For $15 bucks, you're still saving a lot of money. You can check your manuals to see if your audio quality is so high that you need the 1.3a cables. Either way, there's no reason to get this horribly overpriced cable.

The money you save can go into systems that transcode digital signals better. That's where the real improvement in picture and audio is to be found!
7171 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
302 of 321 people found the following review helpful
on March 25, 2008
If it was an analog device, cable helps the quality of picture/sound you get. Not so much on digital world, like your brand new LCD/Plasma TV! Here's a quick comparison that hopefully will help put things in perspective between analog and digital signals.

Let's use radio. You get analog signal when you listen to radio in your 1995 model car. You get digital signal when you listen to radio steam on internet. Now, when the signal is bad, what happen?

In your car, you will hear cracking noises, interference, sound gets softer, etc. It is safe to say that you get lesser audio quality, don't you agree?

On internet, the audio pauses, buffering, or skipping here and there. Notice one important difference between your car's radio and internet radio? You won't hear those cracking noises, softer sound, or any lesser quality audio!! This is the nature of digital signal - 1 and 0, "all or nothing." If you get an audio from digital signal, the audio quality will not be any lesser than the source!

*Signal* degradation does exist in digital world. For example, let's talk HD TV. If signal degrades and cause bit sequence (1&0 sequence) to be unreadable by the TV, the pixel will just flicker on or off. Most of the time you won't even notice it. But if the cable is bad enough, you won't see TV pixels flicker - most TV will not handshake (connect) with the device if inteference is that high... which means you will get nothing. Hence the term "all or nothing."

Signal degradation comes to play if you have *HIIIGGHHH* interference (i.e. living right next to Nuclear Plant) or if your cable length is long (~30 feet). Anything less than 30 feet, if the cable works, you'll see the same exact audio/video quality with 10 bucks cable as 200 bucks Monster cable. More than 30 feet, if your cable doesn't work, get another brand who makes better quality cable for good price (translate: still not Monster).

And don't buy into Monster's "bandwidth" bandwagon advertisement. A 1.3 standard HDMI cable is capable of handling 10.2 Gbps. You have 120Hz LCD TV? Guess what, 1.3 standard cables have enough bandwidth to handle that already! After going through 10 minutes of watching Monster's video on their website, I can conclude one thing: Monster tells you a lot of facts, that much I admit... but they use *selected* facts to make you buy their products. They do not tell you the whole story. They do not tell you what you REALLY NEED TO KNOW, like 1.3 standard, what type of "other cables" they were using to do the Eye Pattern test. For all I know, the other cables they used to test could as well be a 1.0 standard cable that supports up to only 4.9 Gbps.

One last thing I want to mention. Monster always claim that they're building their cables ahead for the future, so that you will not have to change your HDMI cable when new technology with higher bandwidth requirement comes out. But let's be realistic here, you have 2 choices:

a. Buy a Monster cable for 200 bucks so you can use it for 3 years.

or

b. Buy a working-perfectly cable [...]. Year and a half later, you spend another 10 bucks on new standard (1.4?) HDMI cable for the new device.

200 bucks versus 20 bucks in 3 years? Pick your choice. I picked mine.

It is just like what other true experts said; you can get longer, same-quality cable for 90% cheaper.

Hope this helps.
55 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
241 of 260 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2008
I went to MIT where I took classes in electrical engineering, so I'm writing from a knowledgeable background here.

An expensive HDMI cable - or an expensive cable for any digital signal, when a working inexpensive version is available - is a waste of money. This is one of the great things about digital - it either works or does not work. This is not like analog audio/video cables, where the quality of the cable influences the output. An HDMI cable can only do one of two things: work or fail.

Since Amazon sells a number of cables that will work and are far less expensive, save your money and spend it on discs or games for whatever you're hooking up.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
104 of 112 people found the following review helpful
on June 8, 2009
Well, as the old adage goes, "You get what you pay for." In this case, I paid about $5 including shipping for this product in November 2008. It's now June 2009 and the cable has given up the ghost.

I had it connected to my 24" Samsung monitor via HDMI out on my PC, and it worked wonderfully for both that and my Blu-Ray player. Last week, however, I started to run into problems. Blue specks were distorting the picture on my monitor and causing the displayed picture to do some really funky things. I suspected it could be my graphics card or monitor, but it turns out it was the cable.

I don't regret purchasing this cable at all because it was such a good price and it lasted for so long. I do have to warn any potential customers, however, that you may have to get a replacement in 6-8 months. This is a cheap cable, and it wasn't manufactured to last as long as ones you will pay more for.

I'm not recommending going with a Monster HDMI cable, but I do have to let you know that a $20 investment in a name-brand or higher quality cable might be in your best interest.

So, I'm back to the 4ft DVI cable that came with my PC, which should suffice for now as DVI and HDMI can send a crisp HD signal to my monitor.
88 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
66 of 71 people found the following review helpful
on December 25, 2007
I used this cable to connect a Playstation 3 to a 40" Sony Bravia. At 1080p, the picture is perfect. There are no distortions in the picture or problems with any individual pixels.

It's hard to judge the quality of the materials without taking the thing apart but there's nothing noticably poor in the manufacturing or material quality of the cable. It's pretty plain looking and less attractive than the higher-priced cables but who cares?

When you consider that it gives you the same result as a Monster or Belkin cables that cost 10 to 20+ as much, it's clear that you're getting a lot of value per dollar with this cable. And yes, it also implies the opposite with those higher-priced cables.

My only complaint is that shipping was $1 more than the price of the cable. :-)
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
97 of 107 people found the following review helpful
on February 22, 2008
I would not recommend this cable at all. I purchased this cable in order to hook up a PS3 to a Samsung 40" LCD TV. The highest setting I could get though was 1080I. I subsequently purchased another cheaper HDMI cable from Amazon and had no issues at all getting set up at 1080P.

Here is the cable I bought that worked:

Inspire HDMI (2 meter) 6 foot cable HQ 1080P 1.3b
Sold by: BrilliantStore
55 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
67 of 74 people found the following review helpful
on August 15, 2008
Following my review here is the HDMI spec currently which supports the full color depth..notice the bandwidth. Therefore... any cable that you buy that says HDMI 1.3 Category 2 can do *gasp* 10.2 Gbit/s (340MHz) bandwidth. Amazon here has plenty for less than 1 tenth of this and a quick search at my favorite place to buy cables would let me buy $30 for the price of one of these.

Also, money does not equal quality when it comes to cables. I got some high quality Monster cables in a set a number of years ago (big time clearance and it was all the store carried and I wanted it that day). The first time I went to move three of the RCA ends on 2 different style cable stayed inside my amp when I pulled them straight back. I have used probably 100 different RCA, digital coax, and component video cables and Monster brand are the only ones I've ever had break.

So again, if you like paying $100 for something the company makes for $5, I'd rather you just send me the $95 if you really don't need it that bad. I have 6 HDMI cables hooked up right now... so at a savings of $95 per cable that is $570...which payed for my PS3 and an extra game. When it comes to digital... it just plain does not matter.

HDMI 1.3

Released June 22, 2006.[12][13][76]

* Increases single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbit/s)
* Optionally supports Deep Color with 30-bit, 36-bit, and 48-bit xvYCC, sRGB, or YCbCr compared to 24-bit sRGB or YCbCr in previous HDMI versions.
* Incorporates automatic audio syncing (Audio video sync) capability.
* Optionally supports output of Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio streams for external decoding by AV receivers.[77] TrueHD and DTS-HD are lossless audio codec formats used on Blu-ray Discs and HD DVDs. If the disc player can decode these streams into uncompressed audio, then HDMI 1.3 is not necessary, as all versions of HDMI can transport uncompressed audio.
* Cable Categories 1 and 2 defined. Category 1 cable is tested up to 74.25 MHz while Category 2 cable is tested up to 340 MHz.
* Availability of a new Type C mini-connector for portable devices.[39][78]
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
46 of 49 people found the following review helpful
on October 2, 2008
Just go to monoprice and get a good quality hdmi cable for a fraction of the price. Monster had a slight edge back in the analog days...now in the digital day all they have is a lot of peeps money...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
46 of 49 people found the following review helpful
I compared this to a Monster HDMI cable on my 73" Mitsubishi HDTV using my PS3. There was no difference at all. Don't waste your money on those stupid monster cables. This cable works great.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 16 answered questions

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.