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Monster (Alex Delaware, No. 13) Audio, Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Abridged edition (December 7, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375407995
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375407994
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 4.6 x 3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (164 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,649,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Consulting psychologist Alex Delaware has a novel approach to crime-solving: he uses his training to unlock the secrets in the minds of the victims and jiggles the clues he finds there until the right scenario emerges. So when Alex's LAPD buddy Milo finds the hacked-up body of a woman psychologist named Claire Argent in an abandoned car trunk--the second such murder in eight months--Alex heads for her place of employment: the Starkweather State Hospital for the Criminally Insane.

One of Argent's patients at Starkweather is Ardis "Monster" Peake, imprisoned for the unbelievably brutal murders of his mother and the family she worked for, including a small child and a baby. There's at least one eerie similarity between the mutilation of their bodies and Argent's: in all the bodies, the eyes were taken or destroyed. But Peake, diagnosed as schizophrenic and psychotic, is a well-behaved vegetable due to a steady diet of Thorazine, and he hasn't left the hospital since his incarceration 15 years before. How is it, then, that Claire Argent's assistant, Heidi Ott, swears she heard Peake say, "Dr. A. Bad eyes in a box" soon after he hears only the bare fact of her death? And why does Alex find Peake so empathetic, in spite of his violent past and chillingly vacant mind? When other mutilated bodies turn up, Alex and Milo begin to suspect that the real monster is very much at large. Like Kellerman's 12 previous Alex Delaware mysteries, Monster builds to a big, teeth-clenching bang and ends with some very satisfying surprises. --Barrie Trinkle --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

In top form in his latest mystery featuring L.A. forensic psychologist Alex Delaware (who had a bit part in the author's previous novel, Billy Straight), Kellerman devises a deviously twisted, contemporary tale that draws pulsing suspense from the ageless relationship between madness and evil. Delaware teams up with his pal Milo Sturgis, of LAPD Homicide, to track the murderer of Claire Argent, a young doctor who worked at Starkweather Hospital for the Criminally Insane. Argent's badly mutilated body connects her death to the unsolved murder of a young, aspiring actor whose body had been sawed in half. Kellerman masterfully strews the trail of the investigation with crumbs, challenging his heroes (and readers) to distinguish promising clues from red herrings. Argent, who recently left a prime research job to work at Starkweather, led an extremely isolated life that had nothing in common with that of the murdered actor. The Starkweather staff is reticent and unhelpful until a young aide reveals that the doctor had been spending time with an inmate known as the Monster, a mentally deficient man who had been convicted of murdering and mutilating a young family 15 years earlier. Kellerman focuses on Delaware and Sturgis as they probe the hospital's milieu, the Monster's crime, the doctor's troubled and puzzling history and additional murders. A tense climax in the hills above L.A. brings together all the tautly woven threads as Kellerman delivers another chilling look into the dark corners of the human psyche. Literary Guild, Doubleday Book Club and Mystery Guild main selections.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Jonathan Kellerman is one of the world's most popular authors. He has brought his expertise as a clinical psychologist to more than thirty bestselling crime novels, including the Alex Delaware series, The Butcher's Theater, Billy Straight, The Conspiracy Club, Twisted,and True Detectives. With his wife, the novelist Faye Kellerman, he co-authored the bestsellers Double Homicide and Capital Crimes. He is the author of numerous essays, short stories, scientific articles, two children's books, and three volumes of psychology, including Savage Spawn: Reflections on Violent Children, as well as the lavishly illustrated With Strings Attached: The Art and Beauty of Vintage Guitars. He has won the Goldwyn, Edgar, and Anthony awards and has been nominated for a Shamus Award.

Jonathan and Faye Kellerman live in California and New Mexico. Their four children include the novelist Jesse Kellerman.

Customer Reviews

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  • "Writing" 26
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 11, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I usually grab a Dean Koontz novel and am satisfied, but I read the description of this book and dove right into it. I must say, I didn't think I could fall in love with another novelist!
Usually, I can pick out the bad guys in a mystery. Not in this book. I was surprised right up until the end. I kept this book near my bed, and would read it until I couldn't keep my eyes open.
On another note, I work in the mental health field and Kellerman really did his research. Descriptions of everything from medication types to the behavior of patients with various disorders were extremely accurate. I was also happy that he didn't demonize the mentally ill.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By E. Bukowsky HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Kellerman breaks no new ground in his new thriller "Monster". The books starts interestingly enough with our heroes Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware trying to solve a series of grisly murders. They have a hard time figuring out how the murders are connected and whether or not a pathetic mental patient who has been locked up for many years has some connection to the killings. Milo and Alex are likeable enough, but the book has some big weaknesses. It is too long. The descriptions of the mental hospital/prison (Starkweather) are lengthy and tedious. Every scene is described in exhaustive detail. The middle of the book is slow-moving and the ending is convoluted and not particularly suspenseful. If Kellerman's writing had been tighter, the book would have packed a greater wallop. As it is, my interest waned at least 100 pages before the long-awaited end.
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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Sherrie Martin on January 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I'm a long-time Kellerman fan, and "Monster" is one of his best. This is a fast-paced novel of contemporary suspense. Albeit there are some loose ends and unlikely plot mechanisms, the suspense is of the old-fashioned nail-biting variety. The cast of characters -- a motley crew of twisted doctors, calculating nurses, amoral rich people, the has-been actress, etc. -- is well crafted and believable. We don't see much of Robin or Spike in this story, while Milo the cop plays second fiddle to Alex without having to fight the rest of the Police Dept. every step of the way. This is Dr. Delaware's mystery to solve, more so than in some of the previous Alex Delaware novels in which he does little more than consult. The alert reader will find himself rooting for the nominal "Monster" as the action picks up. The series of murders is particularly gruesome but, hey, that's the nature of this genre. The ultimate unveiling of the "Monster" is almost anticlimatic if you've been paying attention and catching the clues, but what a hellava good read getting there!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Kellerman is a fantastic writer. His Alex Delaware novels, in particular, have always impressed me. This one, however, was missing a lot.
There was no action in the book. Milo and Alex spent most of the book hypothesizing. Eventually, their hypothesizing and a small amount of leg work helped them solve the crime.
The mental interplay between Milo and Alex seemed too contrived. There was too much 'lucky' guesswork. In addition, Milo and Alex's attention to Peake's 'predictions' (for most of the book) seemed unrealistic in the contect of a real homicide investigation.
Milo, Alex and Robin, in the past, had been given texture and life over the course of Kellerman's novels. Here, they were one-note characters: Robin cooked meals. Alex came up with brilliant observations and Milo was grouchy.
I have faith (and hope) that Jonathan Kellerman listens to his critics and learns from them, because I still believe he is one of the best out there. Every word I write here is meant as constructive feedback to a great artist.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By lesley on December 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Once again, Dr. Alex Delaware, the white knight shrink rushes to the rescue. With his trusty cop sidekick,Milo(remember tho, the rule of sidekicks? Spock was cooler than Capt. Kirk and Ilya was cooler than Napoleon Solo? Well it works here too, Milo is much more intriguing a character than the blue eyed wishy washy Alex). The two of them are investigating a grisly murders with years old tie-ins. Who did it? The thorazined wreck in the William Castle-esque nut house? His cruel attendants? Or someone from the not so distant past? Your guess is as good as mine, and Kellerman weaves his usual conspiracy laden story. Robin the cutesy girl friend is there as well as Spike the even cuter dog. Nice fast read. thumbs up
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By William Miracle on December 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I'm happy to hear it wasn't just me that thought Monster was not one of Kellerman's better efforts. I am an avid fan of this series and this book left me wondering what happened. I had trouble keeping interested in this plot and that has never happened before. It had very little of the usual drama and twists and turns of an Alex Delaware/Milo Sturgis investigation. I hope his next effort is better. I would hate to think that this series has come to an end.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Old Fisherman on September 26, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Monster is Ardith Peake. A psychotic, near-vegetable who's been locked up in a maximum security hospital for the last sixteen years. Yet suddenly, the Monster is predicting murders before they occur. Alex Delaware and detective Milo Sturgis must try to unravel a mystery that goes back twenty years or more to the time that Monster wiped out a wealthy family in the small northern community of Treadway. But how does this ancient history tie in to the grisly murders being committed today?
I'm a huge fan of Jonathan Kellerman and especially of his Alex Delaware series. I've read and enjoyed them all but this one seemed to lack the spark of the others. The premise is great and the book starts out strongly, but I didn't feel it was as captivating as some of his earlier Delaware novels. In fact, the end started to drag a bit.
However, all that said, Jonathan Kellerman still is a strong presence in the psychological thriller genre. He can write with authority when he discusses medication side-effects, neuroses, and psychoses since he really is a psychologist himself. All this information may sound boring but it really isn't. It all ties in to the plot and plotting is where he usually excels. I just felt the plot ran out of steam toward the end of the book. Still a good book from a good writer. Head and shoulders above a lot of what passes for mysteries these days.
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