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Monster Garage: How to Weld Damn Near Anything (Motorbooks Workshop) Paperback – July 31, 2004

3.2 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Author Richard Finch is an expert welder and the author of several past books on welding for everything from farms to high-performance NASCAR race cars.
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Product Details

  • Series: Motorbooks Workshop
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Motorbooks; 1st edition (July 31, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760318085
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760318089
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 0.5 x 10.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #611,302 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What do you expect to learn about welding from a book? If you're like me, you know you can't learn to weld by using a book, but you expect to pick up some useful information to help you along. I guess you could say that this book had that.

The intro states that this book will "tell you, step-by-step how to make perfect welds every time". I didn't find that to be the least bit true. In the entire book, which has chapters on selecting equipment, prep work, gas welding, TIG welding, MIG welding, and jigging, there were NO step by steps. I don't think there is anyway you could go buy a welder and even begin to learn to use it with this book. I don't think the book should make that claim.

I liked the fact that he does not dismiss oxyfuel welding as old fashioned, but the subject is totally glossed over- there's no info on tip selection, starting a torch, startup or shutdown safety, welding or cutting techniques, etc. He offers some tips on rod selection for certain metals and fuel pressures but that's about it. If you want a good book on oxyfuel welding get Kevin Bodwitch's book.

The TIG and MIG sections are the same- there were some tips here and there that may help you in selecting equipment and torch size, wire speed, etc, but by no means is it the whole picture.

The main gripe I have with this book is the stick welding section- it's three pages! The first page completely dismisses it as a viable welding method for anything but "barbecues and angle iron". Give me a break! There's a great number of certified SMAW welders that would probably disagree with Finch about the viability of stick welding on ANY project. Just like with TIG, MIG & oxy, SMAW has limitations, but to dismiss it like was done in this book is scandalous.
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Format: Paperback
I was checking this out at the bookstore today when after a few pages I realized that I have read and seen these same images somewhere before. Then I saw the Author was Finch and realized that its the same book as his "Welder's Handbook: A Complete Guide to Mig, Tig, Arc & Oxyacetylene Welding". Whew glad I didn't buy two. Still some usefull info though.
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Format: Paperback
The main gripe I have about this book is that it clearly has little to do with the kind of welding one sees on Monster Garage. 90% of the welding done there is on plain vanilla structural steel, probably with exhaust systems as the main excepion. I don't doubt there have been a few projects with some aluminum, maybe the boat, some tanks or maybe a rad.

What I associate with Monster Garage is a) Jesse is a bike builder; b) the projects are mainly simple metal, sometimes some pretty big parts. In this book the focus is on welding thin section 4130, and aluminum and magnesium. This just isn't bread and butter for most folks who will respond to the title.

The book as you find it is about performance welding these high-tech/thin wall materials. And claims to introduce production techniques from NASCAR (and airframe construction), which it is said has revolutionized frame welding because new production MIG techniques are used. This is an interesting subject but again, not the focus of the kind of one-off buiding MG buider's do, or many workshop types. Where it may pay-off for the average welder is in the techniques for MIG on AL, which at least get coverage.

Also, some of the jigging information may be of value to the one-off builder, it's interesting to see airplane wings constructed on wood jigs versus some of the behemoths often used to weld simple frame parts in the small shop. A lot of weekend welders take their lead from set-ups used in production frame shops, for instance, and might get some simpler ideas here.

I'm pro stick myself, but the fact is it has little use in this environment of .065" wall 4130.
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This book was written to explore advanced aspects of welding, mostly as they pertain to high-strength welding, especially for race car chassis and such. If you are a hobbyist or just loved the Monster Garage TV show, this isn't the book you are expecting it to be.
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Format: Paperback
Very good coverage of tube welding , motorcycle/bicycle/aeroplane type tubing including some on vacuum chamber welding titanium.
Not much coverage of stick welding , It does say stick welding has been obsolete for aircraft welding since MIG and TIG processes were invented in 1955 and 1945 respectively.
I consider it the most valuable welding book I have ever seen, and I've read lots.
If you are a beginner and you just want too piddle around and make a trailer frame or the equivilant don't buy It.
If you actually want to make front suspension A arms for a car from 4130 tubing for 200 mph use buy it. If you actually are wanting to build an airplane frame or a serious motorcycle frame buy it.
It mostly covers MIG and TIG somewhat equally possibly leaning towards TIG , and it repeatadly points TIG's superior welds . One has to be a really really good MIG welder to even think of equalling what can be fairly easily done with TIG.
If you want information on stick welding don't buy it. There is lots of stick welding being currently on structural projects bridges and skyscraper building frames. More tons of bead d eposited every year with stick than any other process, but. . . this is because MIG doesn't work well where air currents blow the gas jacket away. Stick is largely irelivant for motorsports and aircraft welding.
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