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The Monster in the Mist (A Chronological Man Adventure) (The Chronological Man Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 119 customer reviews

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Length: 134 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled


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Product Details

  • File Size: 621 KB
  • Print Length: 134 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: June 15, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0056A295I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #285,127 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Andrew Mayne, star of A&E's Don't Trust Andrew Mayne, is a magician and novelist ranked the fifth best-selling independent author of the year by Amazon UK. He started his first world tour as an illusionist when he was a teenager and went on to work behind the scenes for Penn & Teller, David Blaine and David Copperfield. He's also the host of the WeirdThings.com podcast. AndrewMayne.com

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the second of Mayne's novels I have read. After my first encounter (Public Enemy Zero) I vowed to read everything he had available. Mayne will never win a Pulitzer. His prose is not poetic or overwrought with literary inventions. His characters, while vivid, are not prone to long philosophical ruminations about their place in the universe. What Mr. Mayne writes is action/adventue and it is wholly enjoyable. Both of the novels I have read so far were action packed, streamlined, and hard to put down. While reading them you can easily see the silver screen versions they long to become. And don't be mislead by my earlier sentence, his writing is neither clumsy nor distracting. Instead it is pitch perfect for what he wants to accomplish.

What is also worth noting is Mr. Mayne's originality and diversity. Where PEZ took place in modern times, The Chronological Man... takes place in a 19th century Boston that is tinted with steampunk-esque edges. One reviewer likened the main character Smith to a Sherlocke Holmes / Tony Stark (aka Iron Man) mash up and I couldn't agree more. What separates the venerable Smith from these icons is the intense mystery that surrounds him. From the moment he bursts into the novel you become wrapped up in his mystery. How does he know so much; why is he over 80 y.o. yet appears to be 30? He himself becomes an eliptical problem like the ones he poses to his Assistant April Malone. And oh...April...how wonderful a character she is. Smart, sassy, funny, charming, and brave, she is the perfect grounded match for the eccentric Smith. Add in evil doctors, and my favorite beasty sucking people out of the thick fog of Boston, and the recipe comes out quite tasty.

The few complaints I had about Mr. Mayne's PEZ were no where to be found here.
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4 Comments 55 of 57 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is easily one of the best "Doctor Who" (If that is who Smith is) books I have read. I took a chance on this book (it came up in my Kindle search for Doctor Who) and really lucked out. In many ways I enjoyed it better than the canonical Doctor Who books. The way Smiths "companion", April, reacts to Smith seems more realistic and understandable as to how a mere human would interact with either a Time Lord or some stange man mysteriouly hibenating in the basement. Smith's mannerisms and his interactions with April are as entertaining as witty as the best Doctor books. His absurb miscues to conversations and social conventions could easily be any of the last four doctors; pick your favorite and stick him in the role without missing a beat. Also, the ending is far better and more understandable than most Doctor books which tend to give us an entertaining 200 pages ending with an almost incomprehensible, mumbo jumbo, Deus ex machina type ending. I hope the author writes a follow up.

One word of caution: the book is much more graphically violent that Doctor Who, and this Smith is not at all adverse to personal violence or the use of weapons.
1 Comment 13 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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I just got my Kindle recently, mostly because of the argument that it allows the writer to go directly to the public without going through the publishing companies. This book is a great piece of evidence in favor of that argument.

I was a bit dubious at purchasing a $1 book. Then I figured, "What the heck. It's a buck."

A very well spent dollar. The book reminds me in some ways of The Middleman (a 2008 television series) but back in time. It has the feel of several of the shows on the Sci-Fi channel during the summer.

I don't want to go too far in and ruin it, so it suffices to say that I would love to read a sequel. If one never appears, this first book would be enough.
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Like everyone else says, this book was written in the spirit of Conan Doyle, Wells, and Verne. For the quick fun read you don't have to think too much about, it is a wonderful story. Packed with gizmos, gadgets, and a few machines ahead of their time, the story revolves around one mysterious character and leaves you hoping for a sequel. I found only one typo in the book (very unusual for an ebook), and one chronological (pardon the pun) 'issue'. Early in the book there is one reference that could have been clearer, but I know what the author meant by it so I was able to mostly overlook it. He clearly did his research, and I look forward to reading more from him.
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This little gem may strike some people as short and indeed it does leave you with many unanswered questions which I for one hope will be addressed in the sequel(s?), but since I believe that the author intended from the beginning that this book was going to be structured like a golden age pulp it comes in at just about the right length.

This book does a good job of combining Steampunk, Lovecraftian and Science Fiction elements to create a novel environment all its own. It features well constructed characters, although I must admit we don't learn as much as I would have liked about Smith due to his amnesia, however that is more than made up for by the amount of time we spend inside April's head. What I think I liked best about this book was its female protagonist who is written with thought processes like a real person, in her own head she is neither damsel in distress nor bad ass demon hunter, but instead swings back and forth from one end of the spectrum to the other as circumstances and the characters around push and pull on her. This made her seem very real and motivated to me and is unlike so many other female characters in supernatural fiction who in today's world seem so one dimensional.

I recommend this book to everyone, but especially to anyone who likes golden aged pulps, especially those written by Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and H.P. Lovecraft.
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