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  • Monteverdi - L'incoronazione di Poppea / McNair, von Otter, Hanchard, Chance; Gardiner
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Monteverdi - L'incoronazione di Poppea / McNair, von Otter, Hanchard, Chance; Gardiner


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Audio CD, June 11, 1996
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$40.14
$28.07 $10.73

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Monteverdi - L'incoronazione di Poppea / McNair, von Otter, Hanchard, Chance; Gardiner + Monteverdi - L'Orfeo / Rolfe Johnson, Dawson, von Otter, Argenta, M. Nichols, Tomlinson, Chance, Baird; Gardiner + Monteverdi: Vespro Della Beata Vergine
Price for all three: $93.00

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Product Details

  • Performer: Claudio Monteverdi, Anne Sofie von Otter, Bernarda Fink, Sylvia McNair, Dana Hanchard, et al.
  • Audio CD (June 11, 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Label: Archiv Produktion
  • ASIN: B0000057F0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #177,219 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Sinfonia and Prologue
2. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 1: 'E pur'io torno qui, qual linea al centro'
3. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 2: 'Chi parla? chi parla?'
4. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 3: 'Signor, deh, non partire!'
5. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 4: 'Speranza, tu mi vai'
6. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 5: 'Disprezzata regina'
See all 13 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 11: 'Ad altri tocca in sorte'
2. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 12: 'Infelice garzone!' - 'Otton, torna in te stresso'
3. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 1, scene 13: 'Pur sempre di Poppea'
4. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 2, scene 1: 'Solitudine amata'
5. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 2, scene 2: 'Il comando tiranno'
6. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 2, scene 3: 'Amici, è giunta l'ora' - 'Non morir, Seneca, no!' - 'Supprimete
See all 17 tracks on this disc
Disc: 3
1. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 3, scene 1: 'O felice Drusilla, o che sper'io?'
2. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 3, scene 2: 'Ecco la scellerata'
3. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 3, scene 3: 'Signor, ecco la rea'
4. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 3, scene 4: 'No, no, questa sentenza'
5. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 3, scene 5: 'Signor, oggi rinasco ai primi fiori' - 'Non più s'interporrà noi
6. L'incoronazione di Poppea, opera in 3 acts, SV 308: Act 3, scene 6: 'Oggi sarà Poppea'
See all 10 tracks on this disc

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Monteverdi's final opera really is a masterpiece, but its libretto requires close attention--this is not an opera for casual listeners. There is no ideal recording of Poppea currently available--Gardiner's version, while flawed, has many admirable qualities. Sylvia McNair is a gorgeous, sensuous Poppea; Dana Hanchard is the finest Nero on record--her soprano expresses the role's capricious willfulness without having to shout the top notes; Catherine Bott is a particularly fine Drusilla. Much of the rest of the cast sounds uncomfortable with Monteverdi and sings far too operatically--the most unfortunate performance in this respect is from the great Anne Sofie Von Otter, whose stentorian Ottavia overwhelms Monteverdi's lightly scored music. Still, this recording's many fine points make it worthwhile listening. --Matthew Westphal

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I just read Matthew Westphal's review and want to disagree. Von Otter is a fine Ottavia, better in my view than, for example, Watkinson or Larmore. I think von Otter is very comfortable with baroque repertory, I'd even say that's her best pitch. I don't much like her lieder interpretations. Her baroque singing is, perhaps, heavier than that of many other baroque singers, but it doesn't suffer from uncontrolled vibrato, which the only reason a "heavy" "operatic" singing is objectionable in baroque. There's nothing wrong with singing baroque in full and luscious voice, as long as the voice is focused well enough to admit of baroque coloratura. So von Otter's off the hook. I will agree with Westphal, however, that some of the minor roles in this recording are sung too "operatically." Still, that's only a small part of the recording. Most of it is delightful. Michael Chance's Ottone has not a single flawed moment. His counter-tenor is beautifully soft-edged and evenly produced, having not a shade of any "counter-tenor glare." Bernarda Fink's Arnalta, with her breath-taking "Oblivion Soave," is the best Arnalta I've heard. Dana Hanchard, with her boyish treble voice, is very credible as Nero, even though I dream to eventually hear this role sung by a high tenor. Actually, it's already been done, Ian Bostridge sang Nero during some festival in 1998, but of course that recording, if it was ever made, is unavailable. Do you ever wonder how much we, the public, lose from the prohibition of recording devices in theaters? Most of Callas's recordings, for example, would never be here if some fans didn't record them live; now that's impossible. Anyway, don't listen to Westphal: of what's out there, THIS is the best Poppea. Also check out Handel's Agrippina, from the same series. Michael Chance is totally stunning as yet another Ottone.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By madamemusico on April 5, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I may possibly be one of the few people reviewing this recording who actually SAW a performance of this opera onstage...and a very fine one it was, too, featuring an outstanding crop of student singers at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music more than 20 years ago. And when you see this opera as well as hear it, you canNOT be emotionally distant or unmoved by its combination of drama, humor, sensuality and heartbreak...it is, in my opinion, one of the few perfect operas ever written, from ANY era. And this recording perfectly captures what I feel is an outstanding performance, certainly the best I have heard on records or off.
We have come a long way from the overblown Raymond Leppard production of 1961. In 1966, a carefully-chosen cast of early music specialists and a stripped-down orchestra taken from the Oakland Symphony made a classic recording for the Cambridge label; at its time it was considered a masterful recording; yet, only Charles Bressler as Nerone, Carole Bogard as Poppea and Herbert Beattie as Seneca really sang their music with feeling and drama.
It is certainly true that performing Montverdi is not like performing Verdi. You cannot exploit your chest voice or high notes in quite the same way. But, I wish to point out, Monteverdi was NOT Lully or one of the Baroque composers, whose music was expected to be sung in a clean but passionless style. Listen to Cathy Berberian's now-classic album of Monteverdi arias with Nikolaus Harnoncourt, and you will understand what I mean. You have to sing all the notes and the right style, but to purposely shy away from an emotional reading of the text is sheer folly.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By George Peabody VINE VOICE on March 28, 2006
Format: Audio CD
MONTEVERDI AT SEVENTY FOUR YEARS OF AGE BRINGS FORTH AN OPERA FULL OF YOUTH AND VITALITY!
Even after 3 centuries,the music of Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643)glows with the passionate genius of a musical prophet. He was far ahead of his day in his conception of music as a dramatic, expressive art, and in the realization of that conception. He spurned the dry recitativos common to the opera of the day and instead gave the singers lovely melodies to sing. Short song-like passages were also included in the orchestral score. This opera demontrates well these traits of Monteverdi. Example: the lovely melody that recurs in Drusilla's song that I call her "happy" tune because she sings it first after Ottone shows her that he desires her instead of Poppea; unfortunately not true, but for the moment she believes it. Their are several tuneful melodies that become associated with the characters. The youth and vitality that shines forth through this opera are remarkable, emanating as they do from a 74 year old churchman.

The libretto for 'Poppea' was written by the promenent Venetian poet and impresario, Gian Francesco Busenello(1598-1659). It remains his most significant achievement. The choice of a historical subject rather than a pastoral-mythological one, reflects the tastes of the new, mainly mercantile, audience for opera in the 1640's. Busenello does retain a traditional framework typical of earliest operas: for example, the Prologue establishes the intention of the work to prove Cupid(Marinella Pennicchi) superior to Fortune(Anne Sofie von Otter) and Virute(Catherine Bott). But the actions presents the characters as real (even unsavoury)human beings in realistic siturations.
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